COLLECTIVE MADNESS


“Soft despotism is a term coined by Alexis de Tocqueville describing the state into which a country overrun by "a network of small complicated rules" might degrade. Soft despotism is different from despotism (also called 'hard despotism') in the sense that it is not obvious to the people."

Sunday, November 09, 2008

Obama Has a Chance to Kill OPEC. He Should.

Slay the OPEC dragon.

The new President will be in an unusual position to do what Bush should have done after 911, and that is seize the pricing power away from our enemies.

Oil is dancing around $60 per barrel. OPEC is unhappy and wishes to add an additional export tax of $30 per barrel to fund the good works of Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Iran and Russia. That will drive the price up to $90 per barrel.

The West should not let them get away with it. We have reconciled ourselves to higher energy prices and alternate domestic sources.

The US imports ten million barrels a day. We should add a $30 per barrel import tax.

A $30 barrel tax on imported oil is an astounding $300 million daily revenue stream.

On an annual basis that is about $110 billion. $110 billion is the debt service on $2.2 trillion in debt.

In other words we can finance the restoration  of the  economy caused by the banking meltdown and financial bailout by simply seizing the taxing ability away from OPEC.

We get the added benefit of giving incubation to alternate domestic sources of energy which in turn will create new wealth and industry.

Seize the moment young man. Kill OPEC.


222 comments:

  1. I'm thinking.

    Gotta be careful with this. Remember "Smoot-Hawley."

    You start with oil; where do you end?

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  2. I'm against any new taxes. I rather see the Strategic Reserve used strategically to benefit the economy and stabilize the price of oil. Someone over at CATO has an interesting plan to buy oil low and sell it high with an automated program that has sell and buy trip points.

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  3. First Rule: "Always" be against Against Anything Cato's in favor of.

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  4. Absolute First Action: Require ALL Cars be Flexfuel, immediately.

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  5. You may be against taxes as well as I, but given the choice between Russia, Iran, Venezuela,Saudia Arabia or The US getting the tax revenue, I'm going for the US baby...OPEC setting prices is not free trade. Free trade is not fair trade.

    Someone is going to have to settle the debts of our multitude of deficits. This opportunity is as good as it gets.

    Regardless, oil will be taxed, the question is by whom?

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  6. Second Action: Nationwide Program to put "Cellulosic" ethanol production in EVERY COUNTY.

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  7. Third Action: Get busy on Biodiesel. We're going to have gasoline running out our ears, and a "shortage" of diesel. Gotta get on that.

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  8. I'm gonna "pass," Deuce. Too many unintended consequences.

    I would rather "encourage good behavior," than try and "tax bad behavior."

    You would end up Pissing off the people; and, they'd end up blaming "renewables."

    'Sides, OPEC's not about to pass a $3.00 tax, much less a $30.00 tax.

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  9. Actually, our present policy is starting to bear some fruit. One reason gasoline is down to $2.00/gal (vs $3.00/gal for diesel) is that we're, now, replacing 8% of our gasoline with ethanol.

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  10. Wow!

    I didn't expect to see this entry here at EB for another 10 years. Good on you, Deuce!

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  11. To my mind, electric vehicles are much better suited for urban commutes, while biofuel vehicles better lend themselves to rural commutes and heavy duty lifting. So there's no reason why we should not pursue both.

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  12. Excellent interview with Michael Hudson on debt peonage:

    http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/28003

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  13. I can muster some agreement with that, Mat.

    But, I'm telling you, "what's getting overlooked here is biodiesel. I believe it's the "small business opportunity" of the next ten years.

    You can only get about 12 gallons of diesel from a barrel of oil (as opposed to 22 gallons of gasoline.) These numbers can only be fiddled a small amount.

    Right now, if you produce enough diesel you've got to "overproduce" gasoline. If you produce the right amount of gasoline you're going to "underproduce" diesel. This is going to get "worse," and "worse" as more ethanol comes onto the market.

    And, remember, when we say "diesel" we're also saying "home heating oil." We're going to have to get cracking (pardon the pun) on this.

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  14. I agree with Deuce.

    This was my understanding of Gore's Earth in Balance solution. The Clinton/Gore administration's failure to follow thru was their "nail in the coffin" for me.

    Exceptions, as I understood it then, would be made for truckers, farmers and others.

    Still leaving plenty for infrastructure improvements and other needs.

    With the main benefit, as far as I was concerned, of placing a new level to the energy playing field that would allow new competition without grants or other special privileges.

    Sort of like M.Moore's letting "a thousand flowers bloom."

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  15. biodiesel
    ==

    Rufus, biodiesel will not give you 600 mpg, which is what any decent electric car will give you, and more.

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  16. doug, re: your question as to McCain and Mrs Palin.

    My opinion of John McCain is unchanged, he has performed to my expectations, especially with regards Mrs Palin.

    A variable tax, based upon the price of oil, at the well head, in Texas.

    And the death of the gasoline highway taxes, at the pump.

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  17. The other energy solution that has received no attention, aside from the USAF (!), is coal to oil.

    Whenever it's been brought up it's been given short shrift.

    Personally I think it's the answer.

    The technology is there. And by "there" I believe China is presently using licensed US processing (in competition with other processes.)

    It could be that we're using China's efforts to "prove the prototype." But, again, as far as I can tell, the prototype is already proven.

    Figures I've seen show coal to oil profitable when oil is at $40/bbl.

    The US ignoring coal to oil, especially in light of peak oil concerns, tends to lead me to conspiracy theory.

    Such as: we're going to let our enemies exhaust their supplies, then we'll have'em!

    Which seems the only plausible reason we're continuing to pay them for their fight against us!

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  18. Mat, we've got Millions of Semi's out there. Millions of farm tractors. Tens of thousands of locomotives. They all run on Diesel. They "Can't" run on batteries.

    People in the Northeast that heat with Heating oil (diesel) Can't heat with batteries.

    The Europeans are "locked in" to diesel cars for many years.

    We need it all, son. We're making good progress with ethanol. We're getting started with batteries. We're going to have to get moving on biodiesel.

    BTW, it's starting to look more, and more, like 2005 will go down in the history books as the All-Time Peak for Oil Production.

    The IEA is getting ready to come out with a report showing an annual 9% decline of production from existing wells from here on out.

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  19. Mat, we've got Millions of Semi's out there. Millions of farm tractors. Tens of thousands of locomotives. They all run on Diesel. They "Can't" run on batteries.
    ==

    Absolutely. I agree.

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  20. Trainwatcher, it'll never work. Methanol is deadly poisonous, and the process itself is an ecological nightmare.

    In addition, the plants are about 10 times more expensive to build than ethanol refineries, and are many times more labor-intensive.

    I don't know what the Chinese are doing, but SASOL has been doing this in S. Africa for forty, or fifty years. It's just as expensive, and dirty now, as it was when it started.

    BTW, you may have noticed that as oil sold off 60% the price of coal didn't drop much. Trust me, it's a non-starter.

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  21. Tens of thousands of locomotives.
    ==

    Those can and should be electrified.

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  22. I made this point along time ago...

    all imported opec oil should have a minimum cost of $60 per barrel

    Now if your talking a tax to make it 90?

    go for it...

    ReplyDelete
  23. Over the "Longer" haul, I agree that rail should be electrified (and, Expanded.)

    In the meantime, we've gotta keep it running. Biodiesel.

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  24. Over the "Longer" haul, I agree that rail should be electrified (and, Expanded.)
    ==

    As Kunstler is fond of saying, America today has a railroad system that the Bulgarians would be ashamed of. :)

    ReplyDelete
  25. Those locomotives are already electrified. They have large onboard diesel generators and the wheels are driven by electric motors.

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  26. NO MORE TAXES!!!!!

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  27. Whit,

    Check out my
    Sun Nov 09, 12:38:00 PM EST

    It tells a very interesting story on how the American middle class has been twice taxed over these last several years.

    ReplyDelete
  28. From Cato:
    The arguments advanced against increasing gasoline taxes are applicable to the broader discussion about America's reliance on oil generally. The case for policies designed to discourage oil consumption is nearly as threadbare as the case for increasing the gasoline tax—and for largely the same reasons

    Don't Increase Federal Gasoline Taxes, Abolish Them

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  29. "Conservative wishes are so far from reality it's sick."

    Spoken like the true scorned lover.

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  30. In light of the current political situation, why would we think that increased gasoline taxes would be used for anything other than universal healthcare or social policies?

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  31. Though I tend to agree.

    We are probably fucked, for a long time.

    CATOites even moreso than most, though they are by and large too stupid to realize the extent.

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  32. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  33. From CATO: "Oil is not disappearing, and when it becomes more expensive, market agents will substitute away from gasoline to save money."
    ==

    Unfortunately, there's an entrenched mafia that's preventing this natural transition thru their monopoly power, both in the marketplace and in Washington. You've commented on my "irrational hatred" for GM (Ford as well), and now you know why that is.

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  34. "they are by and large too oblivious to realize the extent."

    Better word.

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  35. Why the "irrational hatred" for GM:

    Via BC:

    Hdgreen: "This is like sending a good $25,000 car to the crusher (forgoing the resale value) to be replaced by a bad $50,000 car that is still on the drawing boards, can't yet be manufactured and will end up costing 75,000."

    ReplyDelete
  36. Whit, I'm getting ready to google the Cato Institute; but, before I do, does anyone want to bet I won't find at least Two Big Oil companies on their board?

    Anyone? Buehler? Buehler?

    ReplyDelete
  37. "Early on," they wrote, "Cato's bills were largely paid by the Koch family of Wichita, Kansas. Today, most of its financial support from entrepreneurs, securities and commodities traders, and corporations such as oil and gas companies.

    ReplyDelete
  38. I, also, saw Rupert Murdoch's name in there somewhere. He, with the 15% Saudi ownership of his Newscorp.

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  39. Exxon, American Petroleum Institute.

    De beat goes on.

    and on

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  40. I just toss in the suggestion from Dr. Bill. We could change the interstate trucking over to natural gas.

    And of course, we should get to work building nuclear reactors by the dozens.

    And we could turn out the lights in the malls at night.

    Less than a mile from here there's a whole empty parking lot with the lights burning all night long. What's the point of that?

    And I'm sure it ups my electricity bill a bit.

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  41. Last I heard, Rufus, our nuclear reactor in south Idaho was getting bogged down in---lawsuits.

    Haven't gotten an update from them for a while, but I'm on their e-mail list, and will post what comes along.

    If we can't build a nuclear reactor down there, we can't build one anywhere.

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  42. There's nothing down there but a few lonely farmers, and an occasional jackrabbit. Maybe a coyote or two.

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  43. And the French and the Japanese, they laugh at us.

    "What fools these Americans are" they say.

    Lighting up their countries with technology developed here, that we have prohibited ourselves from using.

    Invest in a wood stove. It might be the best you can do for yourself.

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  44. Jeez, Bob, Nat Gas is a loser, too.

    There's only so much of that stuff left. Those "shale" gas deposits they keep peein on your leg about are all "Small" wells that play out fast.

    It's just more horseshit from the oil, and gas cartel trying to keep us in the stable.

    Nat gas, I'll bet you anything, will Peak within 20 years. Maybe, a hell of a lot sooner.

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  45. Well, one of these days we'll just squash their shitty little countries, again, Bob. Just like we do every fifty years, or so.

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  46. We're going to build some more Nukes, Bob. The time, and money, just has to "be right."

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  47. I'm against new taxes too.

    Just get the government and the courts the hell out of the way.

    We could be building that nuclear reactor right now.

    Let the democrats pass an emergency energy bill now.

    The democrats have stymied every energy proposition from time out of mind.

    For God's sake drill Alaska.

    Let Ash provide the energy now.

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  48. Ruf, I admit I don't know much about natural gas, except there seems to be more of it than oil.

    Just passing along an idea from Dr. Bill, there.

    I know I'm right on nuclear energy though. We should be doing that.

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  49. Bob,

    Canada is not the US. And if Canada says NO, there will be no Nukes for you. Something to keep in mind.

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  50. When I farmed up on the Camus Prairie, there was a lot of excitement when an oil exploration group came in, and dug a well.
    Everyone was excited. Everyone was hoping to get rich. So, they created some settling ponds, brought in the rigs, and had at it, about seven miles from where I was at.


    Everyone was hoping, but all they got was a 'wiff' of natural gas, so that was the end of that.

    I'm certain that the last thing we want to do is put Maxine Waters at the head of the Energy Department.

    Thankfully, graft, greed, and Chicago politics will probably keep her out.

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  51. I'm not sure I follow you there, Mat.

    I don't know that the Canadians have much to do with it here.

    We are getting bogged down in our own court system, without any need of outside help:(

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  52. You're right about the Nuclear, Bob. It might take awhile, but it'll get done.

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  53. I don't know that the Canadians have much to do with it here.
    ==

    Where do you think the nuke fuel is mined?

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  54. You raise the public profile of Cameco, and it's over. I guarantee you that the Canadian voter will not suffer them for very much longer.

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  55. I think in many places all over the world, I think there is a lot in Africa too.

    I know there is a bunch up on the Colville Indian Reservation, and they'd be happy to sell it to us.

    I don't think getting the fuel is all that big a problem.

    Where do the French and Japanese get their fuel?

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  56. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uranium_mining

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  57. The pie map shows 21% from Australia. They are good guys. They are our friends. We will buy it from them, make everybody rich, all around.

    There is your answer.

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  58. It looks to me, from the pie map, that the 'western world'--Canada, Australia, the US-- has got 48% of the world supplies, right now.

    So, I'm not really worried about that.

    And I think there is much left undiscovered.

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  59. They are good guys.
    ==

    They is. But you is not. :)

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  60. The Job:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XGJq8wrw5I

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  61. You raise the public profile of Cameco, and it's over. I guarantee you that the Canadian voter will not suffer them for very much longer.

    Given the track record of whom the Canadian voter will suffer, that's probably a feather in their cap.

    What's the beef, mat? Until just 6 years ago, the Canadian government controlled CAMECO. For the last 60 years or so it was a government operation.

    Fill in the blanks.

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  62. . every terrorist entity in world trying to get O to see them. Russia wants to get O to not put up the missle shield in Poland... Watch how Mr.. O the false prophet (Rev 6, blackhorse bringing famine) little by little dismantles our defense protections and big by big does things to hurty businesses where they go overseas or out of business making the jobs issue even worse... Mitt Romney, Bobby Jindal. start now building a base to defeat the anti christ. Never before in the history of the USA have we elected a communist. Armageddon has started. Read in Rev 6 the fourth seal to see what is coming. Stock up on food now. Fortify your doors and windows as the new neighborhood watch supervised by muslims, black panthers, young blacks will be coming for your food, guns, money to give to those with less on the block and to spie on you to make sure you toe the O line, as with out the O sign on your forehead or hand (biblical for number of the beast) you will not get any of the food as the world famine begins as told in Bible. His zip code in Illinois is 60606.. Bible prophesy has become to past. Heave protect us.

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  63. Fill in the blanks. With something other than a link to treehugger.com.

    :-)

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  64. Howard Fineman
    writing in Newsweak

    The Chicago Crew Washington will be the Windy City on the Potomac; the locals will bring a pragmatic style that sees any problem as a municipal one writ large (there is, as they say, no ideology in snow removal). Mayor Richard Daley and his banker brother William are mentors. Sen. Dick Durbin, a Richard Daley ally from downstate, will be the go-to guy in the Senate. The billionaire Pritzker and Crown families supplied early fundraising contacts (as did investment banker John Rogers), and Penny Pritzker, Obama's finance chair, is likely to get the commerce-secretary job. Valerie Jarrett, a former Daley staffer who once hired Michelle Obama for a city job, is the Obamas' closest personal and political friend; she is likely to be a presence in the White House. So is Rep. Rahm Emanuel, a Daley protégé, who may well be in line to become chief of staff.

    Council of Elders Obama is the kind of serious, ambitious young man who attracts veterans to his side. And party labels seem to matter little to him. Sen. Richard Lugar, the Republicans' leading light on foreign policy, was an early Obama ally, and remains one. Put Paul Volcker, Warren Buffett and Gen. Colin Powell in this category, too. In Obama, Powell sees a man who could inspire the young and increasingly multicultural officer corps, and Powell has said that Obama is one of the most receptive and perceptive "briefs" he has conducted.

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  65. What's the beef, mat?
    ==

    A nuclear Pakistan.
    A nuclear Iran.
    A nuclear Iraq.
    A nuclear Syria.
    A nuclear Libya.
    A nuclear Saudia.
    A nuclear Egypt.
    A nuclear Jordan.

    So fsck you.

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  66. Paul Volcker, the man who whitewashed the UN in Saddam's Food for Oil corruption.

    ReplyDelete
  67. Re: our post on the teacher brow-beating the children on their support for McCain:

    CCS Headline News - Superintendent’s Response to YouTube

    "I was shocked when I saw the clip of an interaction between a Cumberland County Schools teacher and her students as posted on YouTube. While neutral discussion of the political process is appropriate, at no time, particularly with elementary students, should a teacher infuse his/her political views into the discussion. Most disconcerting was the military slant that made its way into this discussion. We are a military community, serving over 15,000 military students and their families. We value the sacrifices, not only of the military parents but also those of their families.
    We believe that military children are our children, military spouses are many of our employees, and military service men and women are our heroes. We proudly serve our military children and have received national awards for our support of military families.
    I was particularly disturbed to see the uncomfortable position in which our children were placed due to the inappropriate actions of one of our teachers. Please be assured that the actions exhibited in this video are not consistent with the vision of the CCS. Moreover, the actions of one teacher do not represent the 7000 employees in our organization.
    Once the video was brought to my attention, I immediately launched an investigation. Personnel laws prevent me from releasing information regarding individual employees and personnel action taken. I can assure you that upon completion of the investigation, I will take appropriate action.
    Dr. William Harrison
    CCS’ Superintendent

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  68. Presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama's campaign has aimed to break a lot of barriers, but now it's breaking bedtimes as well.

    ...

    Sisters Kristen Tarr, 11, and Stephanie Tarr, 10, sat on a bench near Cornell Hall and read books, while their parents, Marie and James Tarr, stood behind them.

    ...

    Earlier in the evening, the children dotted the long lines that wound around campus streets.


    Bringing Children

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  69. What's the beef, mat?
    ==

    A nuclear Pakistan.
    A nuclear Iran.
    A nuclear Iraq.
    A nuclear Syria.
    A nuclear Libya.
    A nuclear Saudia.
    A nuclear Egypt.
    A nuclear Jordan.

    So fsck you.

    -------

    The link to CAMECO is what, precisely?

    Somebody stole Mat's little bowl of milk?

    --------

    You left out a nuclear France, Germany, UK.

    You left out a partially nuclear California, where as I type some of the juice is coming off pumped hydro storage made possible by the nukes at Diablo Canyon and San Onofre.

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  70. You left out a nuclear Israel, too.

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  71. ... In Obama, Powell sees a man who could inspire the young and increasingly multicultural officer corps...

    A week or so before black Tuesday a friend told me her son and dol had called from Ft Gordon, begging her to vote for O.

    Coulda knocked me over with a feather. I told her to vote for Barr. I think she did. Who knows?

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  72. Senator Obama has promised to change the Bush policy, which has failed to yield results on the Iranian issue.

    The UN nuclear watchdog, which has extensively monitored Iran's nuclear activities since 2003, concedes it is not in a position to fully clarify the nature of the Iranian nuclear program.

    The agency, however, announced in its latest Iran report that its inspectors have not found any 'components of a nuclear weapon' or 'related nuclear physics studies' in the country.


    War Warning

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  73. You left out..
    ==

    I didn't leave out anyone. The whole industry needs to die.

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  74. The whole industry needs to die.

    Go build a composting privy. Buy a wood stove.

    Light a candle.

    ReplyDelete
  75. According to the new ‘doctor Doom’ also known as Dr. Nouriel Roubini, there is a new phenomenon occurring known as ‘stag deflation’. Roubini’s four forces of stag deflation are:

    1. a slack in goods markets,
    2. a “recoupling” of the rest of the world with the U.S. recession,
    3. a slack in labor markets, and
    4. a sharp fall in commodity prices.

    These factors would, “reduce inflationary forces and lead to deflationary forces in the global economy,” he writes in an article in Forbes.


    New Era

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  76. A New Era by Rob de Graff

    Thanks for that link, Sam.

    ReplyDelete
  77. Light a candle.
    ==

    Plenty of other options than being stuck in the past.

    ReplyDelete
  78. great news from the palios...

    again the head of the palios makes the claim there is no connection of the temple mount to the jews...

    In response...

    I am buying a glock and a shotgun..

    fuckin inbred goat fuckers...

    ReplyDelete
  79. Over the past three months, Livni and her Palestinian counterpart, Ahmed Qureia, have been working to figure out how to make the transition from the 2008 negotiations to talks in 2009.

    Both sides have agreed that there is nothing to be gained by a partial deal and that the international community must be convinced that the process is progressing and that they should allow it to move forward without pressure or foreign initiatives.

    Israel and the Palestinians scored a victory when they convinced U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to withdraw her request that they present a document summarizing the negotiation achievements at the UN General Assembly in September.


    '08 - '09 Transition

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  80. Obama to use executive orders for immediate impact
    By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER, Associated Press Writer Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press Writer 1 hr 41 mins ago

    WASHINGTON – President-elect Obama plans to use his executive powers to make an immediate impact when he takes office, perhaps reversing Bush administration policies on stem cell research and domestic drilling for oil and natural gas.

    John Podesta, Obama's transition chief, said Sunday Obama is reviewing President Bush's executive orders on those issues and others as he works to undo policies enacted during eight years of Republican rule. He said the president can use such orders to move quickly on his own.

    "There's a lot that the president can do using his executive authority without waiting for congressional action, and I think we'll see the president do that," Podesta said. "I think that he feels like he has a real mandate for change. We need to get off the course that the Bush administration has set."

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  81. If I can make one more sale, I'm thinking of moving to Wasilla, Alaska

    I know there are some good folks there.

    ReplyDelete
  82. Off topic, we are in the middle of the deer rut in PA and it must be a particularly horny year. the bucks are going insane running all over the place, trying anything with a scent. They have been at it day and night for at least a week to ten and are starting to look a little ragged. I waited on the road while these two young bucks criss-crossed for two or three minutes trying to pick up a scent.

    I thought to myself as to how comical it would be if human beings had a rutting season.

    ReplyDelete
  83. One thing about Wasilla is, it's too cold for a guy like Ash.

    deuce, on a long ago thread over at BC, when the argument was about gays and such, and marriage and all, I advocated that very thing, let's just have a rut, and get it over with.


    There was a lady named Catherine there then, and she said, "Bob, I like that idea, it's Gaia positive, and raunchy" or something like that.

    And Buddy Larsen chimed in with a laugh.

    ReplyDelete
  84. I remember I quoted some stuff from Joseph Campbell, about opera, and murder, and betrayal, and jealousy, and anger, and knives, and old killing, and how much simpler it would be, if we just had a rut every fall.

    It would be a hell of lot simpler, and not fill up the courts.

    I got some laughs.

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  85. Gorelick on short list for AG

    Well that's great. The architect of the "wall" that kept CIA and FBI from sharing intel.

    This dyke is going to be Reno II. Get ready for Weekly Wacos.

    This Obama administration seems to be a lacking a Clinton at the top, because the rest of the new administration sure feels like a Clinton admin everywhere else.

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  86. If I can make one more sale, I'm thinking of moving to Wasilla, Alaska
    ==

    Don't despair, Bob. Salvation will come. And no, you're not too old to learn Hebrew.

    ReplyDelete
  87. You guys have all that scrawly writing, Mat, that I can't any sense of!

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  88. Well, John Podesta was Clinton's Chief of Staff...it figures that he would pick Clinton people. It's also telling that the Clinton White House was a lot more left wing than is generally acknowledged.

    Anyone who thinks Obama is going to govern from the middle, is sadly mistaken.

    BTW - Barney Frank has called for a 25% reduction in military spending. Might as well, I doubt we'll be using it that much anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  89. Following are the reactions of several Hamas leaders:

    Khaled Mash'al, the Hamas Political Bureau chief, said that the US needed to change the erroneous policy espoused by President Bush in the past several years. "We, as Palestinians and Arabs, are willing to have an open mind to any American administration that would respect the interests of the Middle East and the choices, principles, and legitimate rights of our people", Mash'al added

    Sami Abu Zuhri, a Hamas spokesman in the Gaza Strip, said that Hamas considered Obama's election platform to be no different than McCain's. He added, however, that Hamas would determine its position towards Obama according to his actions and political views with regard to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

    Ahmed Youssef, the Foreign Ministry advisor in Isma'il Haniyah's government, expressed his hope that Obama would address the Palestinian issue in a fair manner and embrace a new policy towards Hamas, Hezbollah, Syria, and Iran-a policy different than that followed by Bush. He said that Obama attempted to please the Jews in the US in order to get their vote and money but that it may change since his advisors had more in-depth understanding of the Middle East .


    Obama's Victory

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  90. Barney Frank--let him be inducted into the Marines.

    ReplyDelete
  91. You guys have all that scrawly writing, Mat, that I can't any sense of!
    ==

    Bob, it's only 22 letters and you already know the first 4. We Hebs invented the alpha bet (gimmel daled) to make it simple. Ask moses. :)

    ReplyDelete
  92. Bob, how long do you figure it took Moses the Egyptian Pharaoh to read and write Hebrew?

    ReplyDelete
  93. I thought to myself as to how comical it would be if human beings had a rutting season.

    They do, Bubba; It runs, roughly, from 14 to 74.

    I think mine's going to last a little longer. :)

    ReplyDelete
  94. In the face of the missile crisis, Kennedy held firm. The Soviets backed down, removing the nuclear weapons from Cuba, but the tension between Cuba and the United States has dragged on for more than forty years.

    During that time, political observers and historians have argued that the failed invasion actually strengthened Castro's grip on Cuba. Certainly Che Guevara thought so.

    In August 1961, at a meeting of the Organization of American States in Uruguay, he sent a note to Kennedy saying, "Thanks for Playa Giron [another name for the site of the invasion]. Before the invasion, the revolution was weak.


    Pigs Disaster

    ReplyDelete
  95. Mat, if I could master Hebrew at my age, I'd get "the old folk of the year award" :)

    ReplyDelete
  96. Mat, if I could master Hebrew at my age, I'd get "the old folk of the year award"
    ==

    Bob, if you're young enough to learn to seed Monsanto crop, you certainly are young enough to master Hebrew. And I'll be there to help you. :)

    ReplyDelete
  97. It's embarrassing and troublesome, and there's no nice way to say it: Jerusalem, Israel's capital, was ranked last in livability among the country's 15 largest cities in a survey conducted by TheMarker and Ha'ir. Widespread poverty, lacking education, low levels of participation in the work force, the increased Haredization (spread of the ultra-Orthodox) and a brain drain of secular Jews and young people are only a few of the problems facing Jerusalem.

    The good

    At NIS 758 per resident from 2004 to 2006, compared to an average of NIS 601 overall, Jerusalem spends among the most on infrastructure. One of the most successful projects is Route 9 from the Motza exit to the Begin Freeway.

    ...

    The bad

    There is plenty of housing in Jerusalem, but not for Israelis. Apartment and land prices have skyrocketed in recent years to unprecedented levels, mainly due to a massive influx of foreign residents who cluster in the city's high-end and city center neighborhoods.

    Last in Livability

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  98. I just drove thru PA and West Virginia (got back home an hour ago) and like last year, tons of road kill. It felt a bit like a crap shoot hightailing it down the highway waiting for a deer to run in front of my. Fortunately my turn didn't occur.

    Why is gas so much cheaper in South Carolina? No state taxes or sumtin?

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  99. The survey puts the price of a gallon of regular self-serve, as of Friday, at $2.30. Mid-grade is $2.44 and premium averages $2.56 a gallon.

    The cheapest gas is in Tulsa, Oklahoma, at $1.89 for regular. And the most expensive is in Anchorage, Alaska, at $3.14.

    In California, gas is 61 cents a gallon cheaper now than it was two weeks ago.


    Drop 48 cents

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  100. Israel has 15 large cities? I'd be interested in hearing more on this news item, Sam.

    ReplyDelete
  101. My wife's little place there in southern Ohio has deer coming out the wing wang. She rented the few acres--for nothing, just mow the lawn--to a really nice guy next door that is a teacher, and grows tomatos. The deal was, he is to keep an eye on the place.

    But, he told me, he could get me a special Ohio license to shoot the deer, day or night, which are all over the place, if I came back.

    Would help him out, he said.

    The deer are a big problem for him.

    ReplyDelete
  102. Yeah, Mat, that seemed like a lot to me also:

    The ugly

    Of all the cities surveyed, Jerusalem's residents rank the lowest on the Central Bureau of Statistics' socioeconomic scale (the fourth cluster, out of ten). Monthly salaries average just NIS 5,647, compared to an average of NIS 6,653 overall, and are declining by about 0.3% a year.

    ...

    No free parking

    Jerusalem's light rail project, nicknamed the "blight rail project" by local residents, should have been completed by 2006, but has suffered repeated delays. At present, the first trains are due to start rolling by mid 2010, easing traffic congestion, but in the meantime the laying of the track often makes matters worse.

    Finding a free parking spot has also become a thing of the past, as parking meters or ticket machines have been installed throughout large areas of the city

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  103. Fraid not, Friends:
    The Stupid Bastards puttin her in REVERSE!

    Obama Weighs Quick Undoing of Bush Policy

    The president-elect is poised to reverse actions that President Bush took using executive authority, possibly including policies on stem cells and drilling.

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  104. Bob, how long do you figure it took Moses the Egyptian Pharaoh to read and write Hebrew?
    ==

    He did get it right on his second attempt on those Ten Commandments. I wonder who was his spell checker. :)

    ReplyDelete
  105. "Third Action: Get busy on Biodiesel. We're going to have gasoline running out our ears, and a "shortage" of diesel. Gotta get on that."
    ---
    Too fuckin easy to go with a proven technology like Coal, right Rufus?

    ReplyDelete
  106. Google, maybe Mat, is all I can think of:)

    ReplyDelete
  107. That's just one of those things, doug, the President can sign or unsign any Executive Order.

    That is what "Change" is all about, when the Emperor changes. All those Laws, that are just Executive Orders, they can flip at a stroke of an Executive pen.

    I had read that were 400 such "Orders" that were in the docket, for a change. The real issue, the use of such undemocratic method of establishing "Law", but hey, it's all good.

    It's not the Executive Federal power, just the personality of the President that really matters, no worries.

    ReplyDelete
  108. 1,570 hits.
    That's all I get, Bob.

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  109. Perestroika To Come To America?

    I have a sinking feeling nothing is going to "Change" other than my taxes will go up.

    ReplyDelete
  110. "It's not the Executive Federal power, just the personality of the President that really matters, no worries."
    ---
    Funny how two so dissimilar personalities could BOTH cause catastrophic damage, but then again, the founders weren't morons, and maybe the personalities aren't really as dissimilar as I imagine them to be?

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  111. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  112. 300 million people "represented" by a "two party" oligarchy is more than plenty to cement "change".

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  113. Check out BC, LaBob, if you're not already suicidal, that is.

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  114. bob, since you are retired from farming, what kind of income do you have to pay yaxes on?

    Just Capital gains?

    We've been discussing ways to avoid that, for over a year. moving the assuets into a Living Trust, that used to be the easiest. Can it be assumed you did not do that, and so face the possibility of a greater Federal bite of your land sales?

    That capital gains, what yu've referred to as a tax on time, is a tax on all those years of security, you recieved for free, at the time.
    Security that allowed you the fruits of the land you rented, from the County, for all those years.

    During all those years that you had no great income, that could be taxed. and so, no great tax liability, but still reaped the benefits of Federal governance.

    Now, it seems, you advocate for a free ride, on the backs of those that paid, full boat, back in the day.

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  115. Two peas in a pod, doug.

    That is the point, it is not the people, it is the Power.

    That an Emperor could, with a stroke of a pen, make or rescind "Law", that is not what I read in the Constitution, as an approved method for formulating "Law"

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  116. Now, bob, you'll have the opportunity to pay a fair share, of the costs of the military adventures you continue to advocate for.

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  117. When was the first "Executive Order" executed?

    ReplyDelete
  118. Earlu on, most likely.
    But when did their use become prevelant?

    After FDR, I'd venture to guess.

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  119. Doug, are you talking about coal to diesel?

    If you are you don't know much about it. It's been proven that you can make diesel out of coal in an emergency (the only time you would want to.)

    It's a dirty, polluting, EXPENSIVE, process. Doug, the coal business isn't like the corn business. It's populated with big, capital-rich companies. They want no part of the process. They know it can't possibly work in the U.S.

    Doug, a biorefinery might employ one worker for every Million gallons/yr production. A Fischer-Trop plant might employ 100 workers per one million gallons, and the plant itself probably costs $20.00 per annual gallon, at least.

    If that's all not enough, there just any way in the world you could get one past the EPA for long. Just ain't gonna work, Bubba.

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  120. Here is an nteresting data set..

    Seems there are 13,466 EO's at this time. Prior to Hoover where the list begins with E.O. 7532, January 8, 1937 - present

    From 1776 through 1937 there had been 7,532 EOs, almost as many since.

    Until the early 1900s, executive orders went mostly unannounced and undocumented, seen only by the agencies to which they were directed. However, the Department of State instituted a numbering scheme for executive orders in 1907, starting retroactively with an order issued on October 20, 1862, by President Abraham Lincoln. That order became necessary when Union forces captured New Orleans; Lincoln issued the order to establish military courts in Louisiana. Today, only National Security Directives are kept from the public.

    Until the 1950s, there were no rules or guidelines outlining what the president could or could not do through an executive order. However, the Supreme Court ruled in Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer, 343 US 579 (1952) that Executive Order 10340 from President Harry S. Truman placing all steel mills in the country under federal control was invalid because it attempted to make law, rather than clarify or act to further a law put forth by the Congress or the Constitution. Presidents since this decision have generally been careful to cite which specific laws they are acting under when issuing new executive orders.

    Wars have been fought upon executive order, including the 1999 Kosovo War during Bill Clinton's second term in office. However, all such wars have had authorizing resolutions from Congress. The extent to which the president may exercise military power independently of Congress and the scope of the War Powers Resolution remain unresolved constitutional issues, although all Presidents since its passage have complied with the terms of the Resolution while maintaining that they are not constitutionally required to do so.


    [edit] Criticisms
    Critics have accused presidents of abusing executive orders, of using them to make laws without Congressional approval, and of moving existing laws away from their original mandates.[1] Large policy changes with wide-ranging effects have been effected through executive order, including the integration of the armed forces under Harry Truman and the desegregation of public schools under Dwight D. Eisenhower.

    One extreme example of an executive order is Executive Order 9066, where Franklin D. Roosevelt delegated military authority to remove all people (used to target specifically Japanese Americans and German Americans) in a military zone. The authority delegated to General John L. DeWitt subsequently paved the way for all Japanese-Americans on the West Coast to be sent to internment camps for the duration of World War II. Thousands of German Americans and Italian Americans were also sent to internment camps under executive order
    wiki

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  121. Presidents have issued executive orders since 1789, usually to help direct the operation of executive officers. Some orders do have the force of law when made in pursuance of certain Acts of Congress, when those acts give the President discretionary powers.

    wiki

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  122. C'mon now Rat, that's not really fair to old bob.

    The one military adventure I've advocated is bombing Iran, to prevent them from getting nuclear weapons.

    It may be too late for that now, and, it's not going to happen.

    We had to go into Afghanistan.

    As for Iraq, I don't know that we should have, but, once in, stick it out.

    Like planting that damned spring wheat Larker. If you do it, stick it out.

    Remember all the democrats were saying what a threat Saddam was.

    We have their voices on tape.

    It got tough, and then they used it to hit on Bush.

    I think it is really really disgusting how they hit on Bush, after voting to go to war.

    And, I think I could go back through the threads, and point out some of your comments, where you advocated bombing Iran, too. But your idea was do it really really hard. And, I think you are right.

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  123. Now, bob, you'll have the opportunity to pay a fair share, of the costs of the military adventures you continue to advocate for.

    I already pay more than my fair share, and I haven't advocated any more military adventures than you.

    In fact you may be a bigger hawk than me.

    But, it's all up to guys like Ash, now.

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  124. The fascists that we have now elected to the White House are talking about taking the licenses for radio from 6 years down to 2.

    They are going to be attacking freedom of speech.

    Long Live The Elephant Bar!

    ReplyDelete
  125. Saddam was long gone, from power in Iraq, by June of 2003.

    When the US cancelled local level Iraqi elections.

    You advocated then, and continue today, to stay on, there.
    $10 Billion per month.

    Pay your fair share, without complaint, it's the patriotic thing to do.

    Or advocate for cutting expenses, in the military, as that is the greatest area of discresionary spending, and the US spends more annually than all the rest of the world, combined.

    An easy place to find cost reductions, but which you advocate no cuts in, at all. Calling such ideas, "gutting the military".

    Time to pony up, and pay you fair share.
    Just because you paid less than a fair share, for all those years, deferring your income to the future, does not mean you should be able to continue the practice, now, when the money flows.

    If the money does not flow, you still will have recieved more security than you paid for, as those taxes will continue to be deferred, until you or your estate has the ability to pay, a fair share.

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  126. I have not complained about paying the taxes, bob.

    You do, constantly.

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  127. I think once we got in there, we have a duty to stick it out, but I don't think we will now.

    I don't think the money is all that big a deal, but it makes a great talking point.

    Time to pony up, and pay you fair share.
    Just because you paid less than a fair share, for all those years, deferring your income to the future, does not mean you should be able to continue the practice, now, when the money flows.


    That's just a bunch of bull shit.

    You farm at a loss, for many years, see how you like it.

    ReplyDelete
  128. Maybe I pay more taxes than you.

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  129. Don't give me a bunch of crap about taxes.

    Jesus Christ I have paid.

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  130. A hell of a lot more than Ash, I would think.

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  131. You've got a losing argument on the taxes, Rat.

    I can beat you at that game.

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  132. Bob, by giving the Feds a single penny, you've already volunteered more tax money than you ought to. They should consider themselves lucky.

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  133. Matbe you do, bob, maybe you do not.

    I spend a lot of time and money, in an effort to legally pay less. I've made financial decisions based upon tax code. Maybe you have not.

    Maybe you are taking advantage of Idaho's tax laws. Claiming your land as ag use, when it is really landbanked for development, without any current ag utilization.

    If the land lies fallow, it is not a farm, but a subdivision waiting to happen. But you, like Kemper Marley, want to keep the developmental land under an ag use tax basis, while it is not being utilized in that manner.

    The State provides huge property tax advantages to farmers, which you wish to utilize, while not farming the land, but trying to develop it.

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  134. :)

    I like you attitude, Mat.

    But, I'm not against paying taxes. We need some stuff, and the government is not all bad.

    It kind of ticks me off, when I get accused of "not paying my fair share" by a guy that doesn't know a damn thing about me.

    And damned near wanted to take my wife to Federal Court for voting abesentee in Ohio, when she has every right to do so.

    More so, in fact, than those guys sitting on some park, where the Federal Judge said "That's your address."

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  135. "taking the licenses for radio from 6 years down to 2"
    ---
    Isn't that also a "taking" in terms of expropriating something of monetary value?
    (which is probly no prob for fascists, anyhoo)

    ReplyDelete
  136. Maybe you are taking advantage of Idaho's tax laws. Claiming your land as ag use, when it is really landbanked for development, without any current ag utilization.

    Which is absolutely bull shit, because we have farmed it forever, and that is still what it is.

    No one would try to go into the developement business, just to be taxed out of existence.

    You don't know what you are talking about.

    ReplyDelete
  137. and the government is not all bad
    ==

    It is when it's the government. :)

    ReplyDelete
  138. What you are showing is a kind of rancourous hate the guy that has obeyed the law for three generations and built the society kind of crap.

    It's a kind of jeolousy.

    Go to hell, prick.

    I'll stick with Mat.

    And, maybe Habu, too.

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  139. Good night, Mat, it's been a long day.

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  140. If your wife awoke the majority of the mornings of 2008, in Ohio, bob, then she is a resident of Ohio. If she is an Ohio property owner, that lives in Idaho, she was a fraudulent voter. As happened to that McCain organizor in CA, claiming his old boyhood home as his current residence. Bail was set at $50,000.

    A fellow living on a bench, in his State of residence, is more of a resident than an out of State landlord..

    You certainly have a sliding scale of rightousness. What is good for the goose, you claim fatal for the gander

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  141. g'Nite Bob.

    aleph.. bet.. gimmel.. daled..

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  142. Bullshit.


    She called the court house.

    Go to hell.

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  143. It is about now, not yesterday, bob.
    Yesterday, and for three generation, that land was farmed.
    Now you say it lies fallow, awaiting development.

    Pay that development land tax rate, since you no longer farm it,
    But keep it landbanked for development. Taking advantage of a tax rate you NO LONGER qualify for, though you once did.

    Or put the land back in production, a get that tax subsidy, deservedly, rightously.

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  144. She qualified to register, if she claimed residence in her property, bob.

    But she was not a residentin that property.

    That's fraud, amigo, on the face of it.

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  145. It's not fallow, asshole.

    It's being farmed.

    Go take your forever whining somewhere else.

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  146. Same court that lets people declare the National Forest or a park bench home, bob.

    Goose and gander standard, it does not wash.

    ReplyDelete
  147. ah, hell, I know, the Jews brought down building Number Three.

    Christ.

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  148. Well then, bob, you've misled us, all these months, about the land not being farmed and you being retired.

    Or perhaps someone else is doin' the farmng, on that land.
    Which is good.
    America needs the wheat.

    That is what's growing where the RV park was going, no?

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  149. The Jews did it?
    Really?

    Building three?

    Wow!

    All this time I thought it was the Pakistani and Building Seven
    Shows what I know.

    ReplyDelete
  150. dRat,

    You're being extremely stupid in your attack on Bob. We all know the Feds do not represent neither you nor Bob. The taxes they take is stolen loot. That should be the start and the end of this discussion.

    ReplyDelete
  151. And yes, legalized theft is still theft.

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  152. I am not attacking bob, not at all.

    bob has made a series of claims, as to tax fairness, land use, residence and equality under the Law.

    Standards which he wishes to apply to others, but not himself.

    Merely pointing to the discrepency between rhetoric and reality

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  153. Standards which he wishes to apply to others, but not himself.

    Bullshit.

    And, I don't like it.

    You have no reason to say something like that.

    My wife called the lady in Ohio to see if she was still a voter there.

    And, she was.

    So, they sent my good lady a ballot in mail.

    Take it up with the Ohio Secretrary of State, prick.

    And you don't know a goddamn thing about taxes, here, asshole.

    Always a moaning sad asshole.

    I think maybe Habu had you figured.

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  154. Hey, Mat, fair, or otherwise, anyone that can get under Bob's skin is OK by me!
    He's the one that loves to piss me off by pretending Bush is just an honorable Bloke doing a fine job after I point out that he gave the country away by insisting on violating his Oath of Office, and shits on all that is decent by playing his little games with two human beings and their families to please his faggot-friend Johnny Sutton.
    What a great and honorable Dude!

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  155. The idea that one should forfeit their Fourth Amendment protections, while camping in a national Forest, seems a tad radical, almost facist, to me.

    The idea that a citizen that has no property, nor even a roof to live under, does not have the right to vote, while an out of State landowner does, a tad undemocratic.

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  156. bob has made a series of claims, as to tax fairness, land use, residence and equality under the Law.
    ==

    And we all know the Law was sold to serve the rich oligarchy. So everything to do with the law is BS. Your merely pointing out the discrepancy between rhetoric and reality is BS.

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  157. I just love a good Bar Fight!

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  158. And see, when I am polite and of good cheer, bob is reduced to name calling and profanity.

    Just like a nigger

    ReplyDelete
  159. Nope, not BS at all

    But a rallying point for conservatives

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  160. White Bob ain't gonna like that!

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  161. Hey, Mat, fair, or otherwise, anyone that can get under Bob's skin is OK by me!
    ==

    :)

    As I said earlier, it takes 10 years for someone to change their mind. Bob's old, but I think he managed to do it under 10. And under my tutelage he'll manage Hebrew in under 2.

    ReplyDelete
  162. The Court is wrong to let the homeless vote, but right to allow out of State landowners the franchise.

    That is not "right", nor "conservative"

    ReplyDelete
  163. If we were to look in Mrs bob's purse, would her drivers license be from Idaho or Ohio?

    There is the real evidence of the State of residence.

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  164. I've already called, 'Rat:
    They'll soon have some visitors from Moscow PD at their door.

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  165. There is the real evidence of the State of residence.
    ==

    And that matters because?
    Because we all need to play by the oligarchy dictated rules in which they game the system. So fsck them. And fsck that.

    ReplyDelete
  166. Judging by content of character.

    Nigger bob, has a real true ring to it, don't it?

    ReplyDelete
  167. bobal

    rino-rat told you performance counts and cited Bushes popularity, failing to point out that the Congress has a rating only half as popular as the Presidents or pointing to the fact that Harry Truman was judged equally hard by people such as rino-rat, until years of perspective gave them a true appraisal of the man. rino-rat is a pup on a mission to destroy Republicans. Have you noticed how he’s wet his pants over the election of obama while continuing to condemn President Bush. Rin-rat definitely has an agenda, and always a excuse.

    rino-rat's duplicity in calling himself a Republican while never in all the years I have read his buncombe has he supported the President. Not once.

    Bobal, don’t let rino rat subvert your support or depress your feelings. He’s got a twisted sense of loyalty and a few other Napoleonic complexes. Hell he even supported the Democratic mayor of his home town..

    But Bobal, in the end you're not in the proper forum, which you didn't ask me but I'll say anyway.

    rino-rat is an obnoxious thing, as is ash , and a few others so unless you just enjoy being aggrivated you'll move on to some place nice like Maggies Farm Blog.
    You can let these five or six folks blog themselves silly until they to leave, in large part because of rino-rat.

    Maggies Farm

    http://tinyurl.com/fvkn7

    Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  168. The Kremlin should have had a fleet of Gremlins to use on official business.
    Here come the Gremlins from the Kremlin.

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  169. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  170. It matters, mat, because those are the rules we play under.

    There won't be a revolution, but an evolution.
    Gaming the System, or opting out of it. That's for each individual to decide, for themselves.

    ReplyDelete
  171. dRat,

    We're all niggers. Spent shells. But at least we're slowly being educated to that fact. And maybe someday soon, we might sum up the will to do something about it.

    ReplyDelete
  172. Maybe the third time will be the charm!

    ReplyDelete
  173. It matters, mat, because those are the rules we play under.
    ==

    No, those are the rules you get fsck over by. And that's not rhetoric, that's reality.

    ReplyDelete
  174. You just reminded me of back in the good old days when your mac would make your deleted posts disappear entirely.
    IDF Special.

    ReplyDelete
  175. I supported Mr Bush until he decided that he, as CiC, could not win the "Long War".

    Then I left his cohort, or shall I say his cohort left me

    McCain carried AZ, but not FL.

    Just where are the rinos?

    habu, you have made the five or six of us bloggong to each other comment, before.
    You keep coming back.

    ReplyDelete
  176. dRat,

    Explain to me how is it that 300 million people can be represented by two parties? If that's not BS, I don't know what is.

    ReplyDelete
  177. I agree with Habu, Mat, WiO and Doug, all the good people.

    ReplyDelete
  178. Hey, 'Rat,
    After the Palin treatment, I've come to regard John as being like Powell:
    Anything and EVERYTHING that can be done, will be done, if it enhances his legacy/reputation.

    How would you describe him?

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  179. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  180. We're the White Squad, LaBob, just don't read me too closely this evening!

    ReplyDelete
  181. As I always have, doug.

    I hope Mr McCain enjoys his retirement at the Vortex Ranch, he has certainly earned it.

    ReplyDelete
  182. They are not represent by two Parties, but by 535 individually elected representitives, mat.

    There is no reason that there are only two Parties, except that it is easier for the elites to control that way.

    That most voters fall into the binary choice mode, it is just an indication of the lack of historical knowledge most of the US electorate has.

    As well as a vote for the status que.

    ReplyDelete
  183. It's not even a binary choice. A vote for the status quo is the only choice. And this shit needs to end.

    ReplyDelete
  184. You've lined out some of his transgressions, but I don't recall a characterisation of Big John.

    ReplyDelete
  185. He is an elitist, doug, one that should be retired ASAP.

    He has no, or little, care for others than himself.

    He should enjoy his retirement, as I wish him no ill, but he is what he is, a carpet bagging gigolo.

    ReplyDelete
  186. That is why, nat, I advocated for the Librarian option.

    Looks like that recieved about 2% support, a far cry from the 39% Mr Lincoln won with.

    ReplyDelete
  187. I remember now you once called him "mad."
    Sometimes hard to tell if it's that, or just really stupidly out of touch.
    ...which might be called mad, I guess.

    ReplyDelete
  188. A change in the staus que, that is not a popular position with the electorate.
    Change within the staus que,
    that recieved 52% of the vote.

    ReplyDelete
  189. Green Libertarians is a natural ideologically sound grouping. And I have no doubt that such a grouping represents the majority of the electorate.

    ReplyDelete
  190. In general terms, mat, I'd go for that, but I am in the distinct minority.

    A 2%er.

    ReplyDelete
  191. Change within the staus que,
    that recieved 52% of the vote.
    ==

    Again, I call BS.

    Not for second do I fall for the oligarchs Big Media manipulation.

    ReplyDelete