COLLECTIVE MADNESS


“Soft despotism is a term coined by Alexis de Tocqueville describing the state into which a country overrun by "a network of small complicated rules" might degrade. Soft despotism is different from despotism (also called 'hard despotism') in the sense that it is not obvious to the people."

Thursday, November 16, 2006

Muzak and Haight Ashbury

In 1967 did you ever imagine that someday you would hear the psychedelic "Somebody to Love" by Grace Slick and the Jefferson Airplane played on the "muzak" at a Walgreens pharmacy? For those of us old enough to remember the mind numbing "elevator music" of the 1960's, hearing 'our music' nearly forty years later in the geriatric atmosphere of a pharmacy is a bittersweet irony.

It was all about the drugs then and it's all about the drugs now.;)


BTW - Grace is now 67 years old and the combined ages of the Rolling Stones is about 250 years with the youngest Stone being a tender 59.

153 comments:

  1. Yeah, but now the drugs are prilosec, crestor, and viagra.

    Well, one out of three ain't too bad when you're sixty.

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  2. i think Buddy is renchard.

    he's smart,plays his hand close to the vest BUT when he gets down, i mean gets down, he starts to sound like a cross between a historical classist and a philosophy professor.
    and now we know he can jump
    Rufus, I agree, I was just being a turd. It's way to volitile a subject and I really don't think it needs an airing.
    I pray, we have all. Accepted that; it is what it is, whatever that is,is what: it should be. As,for if it weren't? As it is then it wouldn't. Be Is, but was, and we, have moved, to: is, not was: so there you have it? surprise in every box!!

    Old aircraft

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  3. but then again newer aircraft are usually newer

    New JET

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  4. You know you're getting old when:

    You click on Habu's link, and your first thought (well, second thought) is, "How many of them little blue pups do I have left?" and;

    "Is that enough?"

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  5. Yeah, Buddy's the only one who never brings it up.

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  6. Uh, excuse me; I'll be back in a minute.

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  7. No, I'm not Runtchard. There I brought it up. Wait, no i didn't.

    But, lessee here, how many shape-shifters hang out here?

    Of those, how many are capable of writing that Seattle thing awhile back?

    Hmmmm...Now, i realize habu has said straight up that he ain't him--but, could that be, disinformation, as in toying with the limits of the medium? Are we an experiment? AM I an ANIMAL?

    I report, you decide.

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  8. Dozens of literary masterpieces and international bestsellers have been banned in Iran in a dramatic rise in censorship that has plunged the country's publishing industry into crisis.

    ...

    Another publishing house has been banned from selling a successful series of books featuring lyrics by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Doors, Black Sabbath, Queen and Guns n' Roses. Stores were told to remove the books or face closure.


    Censorship Purge

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  9. I think sausage was in seattle after he recounted his wild night on some jungle juice.

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  10. Iran - gee what a fun country to live in.

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  11. Book-banning/burning = fascists/communists every time.

    Whit--you're RIGHT--I'd forgotten about sausage. The styles are really simyilar. That's who it is. My apologies to habu.

    Unless habu is sausage--naaah. could never be.

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  12. Sam:
    We need more news out of Iran. A Fox News reporter, Jennifer something, reported last night on the growing popularity of cosmetic surgery especially rhinoplasty in Iran. I was looking to see covered the women are. Pretty much all were wearing a headscarf. We just don't get enough info out of Iran to know what the everyday people are thinking. Last year, there reports of student demonstrations being put down by the Mullahs thugs...lately nothing.

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  13. Habu, sausage? No way!

    Minced meat, maybe.

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  14. Stayin' on the sunny side,
    those Iranian women.

    Put bandages on their noses, even when they have not had a "job".

    pyscho babes from hell, seems to me.

    The Students rioted, the transportation workers went on strike, we have not spread enough cash around to the diseffected. Unfortunately I think Mr Hersch lied about our covert fellows working there, in Iran.

    To bad, for US.

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  15. i saw that, whit--the rhinoplasty segment. Tonight she has a report on stem cell research in Iran. I have to say, the thought of wasting those folks wholesale is horrendous. most of 'em are kids. what ARE we gonna do about that regime?

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  16. I can't believe that those normal, happy-looking folk, trying so hard to look western, buying our cultural stuff, can be a part of that genocidal regime. It's crazy-making.

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  17. Whit, I've been reading up on Hemp. It would be a hell of a biofuel. It's got more oil than soybeans, canola, or safflower; and, It's a Perennial.

    It would be far and away the best biodiesel crop we could raise in the U.S.

    If it was legal.

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  18. nothin', that's what "we" are gonna do, buddy.

    That is what we have been doing and an object at rest tends to stay at rest.

    The Pakis tested an 800 mile, nuclear capable missle today, of NorK design, they say.

    Stem cells are not human, the Mullahs decided. She mentioned the exact day after conception that allah implants the soul in the fetus, after that, it's human.

    No late term abortions girls, sorry.

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  19. yep--you're right, rat--they could be nutz as all hell, and just being sweet for the american tv reporter. Think, buddy, THINK. fall for that shit, after railing against it for a lifetime. damn.

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  20. Rufus:
    Don't get too excited about the hope of hemp. The people hopped up on hemp are the most likely to hype it.

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  21. oddly enough, rat, that 120 day prescription may be exactly what we need here, to prevent a new civil war.

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  22. Buddy,

    You mention an asset we have deployed in Iran already. Whatever advances the Left thinks it makes here, what with its "progress," we don't need any Soros funding to spread the greatest and most prolific culture ever seen by Man.

    How to exploit this resource? Well, I don't know. All I'll say is the Kill 'em All option precludes ever using this resource.

    Is it possible to design a rational strategy for exploiting these cultural vulnerabilities in Iran?

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  23. did you see Mark Furmann gut Alan Colmes like a fresh-caught catfish?

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  24. Turkey cuts military ties with France..

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  25. The thing is; and you can laugh if you want; the Persians ain't Arab. There, obviously, IS a difference. Now, it's true, 51% of Iran ain't Persian, but 49% is.

    The Persian women I've known in the states have been hard-working, aggressive (but NOT abrasive,) good gals. The men seemed a bit "crazy," but I've only known a couple of them.

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  26. ppab, because fascist regimes so often fall, we tend to forget how effective a brutal secret police can be, in the meantime.

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  27. They are so status oriented that they pretend to have a nose job. What do their friends think, when the bandages come off, and Jimmie Durante is still protuding from her face? Pretend the nip and tuck was a success?

    They are all living in a fanstasy land. From the reports I've seen. Fantasy, projection and denial, Iranian stocks in trade.

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  28. Over the Armenian genocide of 1915- 1917.
    To deny the genocide is illegal, in France, just like it is to deny the WWII holocaust of Jews and Gypsys by the Axis Powers.

    Turkey is in denial about denial.
    The Pope visits Turkey soon, wonder if he gets out alive?

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  29. ever seen pics of young german women, in the hitler rope lines? orgasmic. fantasy gone wild.

    Mat, here.

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  30. Its a good point - one lost on a moment's romantic take on history.

    What alluring bliss that is, the optimism that threatens fear with hope but succumbs to the ineluctable imposition of the sweet surrender.

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  31. It was a Turk "right-winger" (from the "Grey Wolves" right-wingers) who shot the last pope. Unless you read the KGB releases.

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  32. ppab, remember winston smith in '1984' finally dissolved in tearful 'sweet surrender', too.

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  33. The French, and the Turks; tough to pick a side, there.

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  34. Here's something to chew on -

    I'm not sure what the affect of easy access to information is on governance as well as the citizen's involvement in that governance.

    But this technology will not only expose US congressman - it will get out on the Internet and expose Iranians, Saudis you name it.

    Maybe that's a direction to go in.

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  35. Just something that Murtha video made quite unambiguous.

    Tiny information gathering devices can make some compelling media - might even have more of an effect in the unstable political environs of Saudi Arabia and Iran.

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  36. That fellow, buddy, the Pope shooter, he was out of jail for a while there. Doin' interviews and such. I do believe the Turks tucked the boy away, it was getting embarassing for them, I think.

    Talk of a movie deal, as I recall, was the straw that broke that camels back.

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  37. yeah but you get some glenn miller go'in down, string of pearl etc and watch all ages bop.

    i really don't care who i am. i use to think i was smart, then i got dumber as i learned i wasn't smart.
    i use to be young and flexible. noW i'm old and have to do my tai chi and streching daily to stay flexy.
    hairs almost a memory.
    blue veiner with a plum ..hah
    eyesight aided
    still strong but jeez the time between it , this tai chi,grocery shopping, watching options,selling my baseball stuff and gett'in 8-10 rack is a load.
    ain't smoked a fatty in 15 years and been out of the rest for longer. put i'm grow'in some poppies in montana..they really like it there. hell my mother-in-law has about 30 growing...I asked if she knew ...clueless

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  38. an air-drop of small-arms and ammo over Tehran would help, too. Where's Air America? (no, not that frikken radio show)

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  39. It's probably not really possible to "salvage" a country that's ate up with Islamism. How sad.

    I've thought for some time that if it was possible Iran would be one that was, maybe, salvageable.

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  40. Pakistan, and Indonesia were my other two. Of course, I thought there might be Some hope for Iraq. That was a helluva call :/

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  41. Willie Nelson still plays at my house, habu. Stop by some time and get in the groove, again.

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  42. Turkey cut ties with France..did they recall their amb?

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  43. Yəḥezqêl 38

    Gog and Magog are Russia and Turkey.

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  44. Nah, Habu; their Generals just aren't taking any long, warm, soapy showers together, this week.

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  45. How long ago was it, buddy, that we discussed how to destabilize Iran, couple of years, anyway, no?

    Right out of the late 50's playbook, you said. But since the US tanks quit rollin' so did the rest of US, it seems.

    No revolution in Iran, the Son of Shah sure let US down. No matter being friendly with the Bush 41 team.

    All of the options, short of real War, were not even tried. Sad, so sad.
    We will have backed US into a corner, where a whole lot more people are gonna die, to end this "Long War" in a short time.

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  46. Rufus...as gauling as it is pick the French..better food


    Buddy...Inter Mountain Airways,Southern AirWays, Air America ..great outfits..

    had a Rhodesian pilot friend had engine trouble and set her down on a nice savanna. woke up with a pride of lions all over his airplane..said he was scared

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  47. DR, yeah i thought the shah's son was gonna do some shit and he's nowhere man now

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  48. You know you're in the shit when the "All American" heros are porn puppets.

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  49. "Since 1984, the Turkish military has bombed and depopulated more than 3,000 Kurdish villages in its campaign to eradicate the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), a militant Kurdish opposition group. As a result, 30,000 people have died, and two million Kurdish refugees have been driven out of their homes into overcrowded urban shantytowns."

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  50. Can you imagine a country without Black Sabbath? Holy smokes..

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  51. Yeah, mat, but those Turkish bastards were supposed to be "our" bastards, but backstabbed US after 60 years of payola.

    Who has whose number in that Game?

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  52. As their conference nears its end, NATO parliamentarians were united Thursday on the need to bring more stability to war-torn Afghanistan, what they can't seem to agree on is who will do it.

    ...

    A second committee report at the conference specifically chastised Germany, France, Italy and Turkey for not dispatching additional troops.


    Quebec City Conference

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  53. The money quote

    "Despite the turmoil, Konigshaus said he believes NATO will survive as an institution.

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  54. The Turks and the 4th ID was but a foretaste of what was to come in the Region, not an isolated incident, at all.

    Shows how woefully unprepared the US really was, and still seems to be, for the politics and such in the Region.

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  55. Turkey's massive spending on military modernization began in the 90's just as the Soviet Union fell apart. How does one make sense of that?

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  56. You guys need to remember something about the Shaw. He was one hated son of a bitch. Why would anyone want to fight the Mullahs just to get the son of the hated shaw?

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  57. I'm here to tell ya that if they'd just bombed the hell out of Baghdad until it was rubble we wouldn't be in this mess.

    Well the can't never could and we didn't...we had Shock and Awe..and I'll say it again when they showed that on TV I said I'm shocked cause that ain't shit..we should have had those sons of bitches, every man woman and child scared to look up at an American.They should have been licking out boots.
    We could jammed Al Jeez off the air and had no pics com'in out. We fucked it on strategy and tactics and that's hard to do.

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  58. The Soviets were never a threat, to the Turks, a resurgent Iran was and still is.

    But the Mohammedans seem to have undercut the Secularists, in Turkey, of late.

    The Mohammedans not gaining the Government until '02, have not lost control, yet.

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  59. And, remember this about the Turks; they were slick enough to stay the hell out of WWII.

    I don't see the Turks causing anyone any trouble that doesn't cause them trouble.

    NATO will survive only as long as there is some residual fear of Russia left in Eastern Europe.

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  60. Rufus,
    Look at the demographics of Iran..Young, they don't remember the Savak or the Shaw...we were told they wanted western ways and were ready to riot....some CIA folks didn't get that place prepared..We know every sewer cover in that town and we should have had HUMINT assets albeit old but still got eyes ears etc. Now were gonna probably let them have nukes, who the fuck nows...we don't have a coherent foreign policy we have an ad hoc diurnal outline written on a scratch pad.
    Condi's become a joke too ..the entire administration is FUBARED this..they have two years and it'll be uphill against the world and the Socialist Democrats

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  61. Look the young people detest the Mullahs; but, they're young people! Except for a handful of college students young people are as apolitical as you can get.

    They just want to be left alone to have sex, and get high. They don't want to fight anybody's wars. They're Nationalistic to the extent that they will rally to fight an invader, but killing each other over a fight between politicians and Mullahs isn't on their top ten things to do today, list. In any country. Especially one that has nose jobs.

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  62. Why now, habu, it has only been 42 months and Baghdad remains unsecure. It has never been save to drive from the Airport to the Embassy. Not one day in 48 months.

    But we're "winning". It's just going to take another 4 to 6 months, then we'll have a better view and greater understanding of just what Victory will look like.

    Just that the metric used to judge has yet to be explained, other than buffed school floors and the election of the Enemy to lead the country against achieving the US Goals. Those are often held up as grand achievements and "mini" Victories along the way, in the "Long War".

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  63. Nose jobs but no Black Sabbath. Go figure.

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  64. Russia lost Kars, Ardahan and Batum by the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk.

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  65. DR,
    Like a smack to the kisser and a "snap out of it kid" you got me.
    All is sweet over there. And now our President even has his father consigliere aboard who'll surely get a higher buff on those floors..

    on a note of no knowledge..do we have any airfields out in the desert of any size? one two, any?

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  66. bonus coverage..my Tai Chi inspiration.

    Tai Chi Master

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  67. Abizaid's gotta be seeing something, there, we're not seeing on television. I'm gonna stick with him.

    Look, Baghdad is a City of over 4 Million. A few hundred, or a thousand of troublemakers with some political cover can cause something to get on television every day; but, that doesn't mean they're bringing down the government.

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  68. Now, there's a "blast from the past."

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  69. Good read on Turkey-Russia Relations:

    http://www.axisglobe.com/article.asp?article=71

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  70. I'm, also, thinking about Mohammed at ITM; he used to whine about lack of security every post. He hasn't been doing that, for a while, now.

    I think we're captive to the "tube." We're seeing a lot of what the bad guys want us to see. I can see that there's a lot of really crappy stuff going on, but Abizaid has to be looking at history, by now. I just can't see him saying, give me a few more months with the same amount of troops if he didn't think he was going to be borne out by History.

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  71. If those in thrall over their newfound power in Washington really want to change things, they should start their term of office by reading the Medal of Honor citation for Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham. He was killed on April 14, 2004, shielding his men from an enemy grenade with his own body.

    Heroes like Dunham are people who put themselves at risk to the benefit of others. Our armed forces are full of heroes.


    Newfound Power

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  72. Had the same thought about Baghdad--huge population, and a few thousand shitheads are ruining the show. there's something bad cooking right now--ambushed convoy, maybe some Americans hauled off.

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  73. It was the original "Young Turks" who 'did' the Armenians--who were Christian, BTW.

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  74. Its here that the metaphor fails,

    Oh, it was There!

    I'm glad you "cleared" that up; I feel better, already. :-)

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  75. A constipated mathemetician can always work it out with a pencil

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  76. You see, being the only one writing on this blog, who ever got up in the middle of a February night and went out to a two-holer (I have no idea why we had a two-holer) I KNOW THAT IT'S ALL ABOUT INDOOR PLUMBING!

    So while everyone else thinks you're shithouse crazy BS Man, "I" know the truth of which you speak.

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  77. DHS: Individual Al-Qaeda Operative Assigned To Each American Family
    November 16, 2006 | Issue 42•46


    WASHINGTON, DC—The Department Of Homeland Security claimed to have "reliable information" Monday that al-Qaeda is proceeding with a plan to dispatch to the United States 120 million operatives trained to antagonize and disrupt every American household. "These domestic operatives are already highly knowledgeable about their assigned families' daily schedules, eccentricities, and deepest desires," said DHS secretary Michael Chertoff. "All we can say is that they are serious, they are committed, and they have a lot more members than we ever imagined." While Chertoff said people should go about their daily lives as normally as possible, he did urge people to be diligent in reporting any unusual activity or suspicious Arab-looking men in their kitchens, bedrooms, closets or underneath their dinner tables.

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  78. bullshit initialisms,
    most of the second world and third world countries i was in in thr 70's only had a hole in the dirt or floor if that

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  79. I hope mine brings his own goat. I don't have one.

    Of course, maybe if I could convince him that water moccassin 'tang was just like nanny nookie it might be a heck of a show to watch.

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  80. If I see my Cottonmouths swimming around with cute little bikinis covering their whatevers I'm gonna immediately surrender to the superior religion and go buy me a koRon.

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  81. hope there's no "hazing" when we jine up them moo-slims

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  82. is bull initials a nom de plume for a 'familiar'?

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  83. DuPont is among the world's leaders in developing and commercializing renewable, bio-based materials; advanced biofuels; energy-efficient technologies; safety and protection products and services; and alternative energy sources. These include high-performance products such as: Bio-PDO(TM), which is made using corn as the raw material, as the key ingredient for DuPont(TM) Sorona(R) polymer used in carpeting, apparel, and other applications; Pioneer(R) seeds, which use advanced plant genetics to develop higher yield, higher quality crops; and personal protective apparel with DuPont(TM) Kevlar(R), Nomex(R) and Tyvek(R) for law enforcement personnel, firefighters and emergency responders.

    DuPont - one of the first companies to publicly establish environmental goals nearly 20 years ago - has broadened its sustainability commitments beyond internal footprint reduction to include market-driven targets for revenue and research and development investment. The goals are tied directly to business growth, specifically to the development of safer and environmentally improved new products for DuPont's key global markets.


    Green Award

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  84. Russia is the main gas supplier for Turkey with the market share of 40% minimum. This gives Russia a guarantee of Turkey's political loyalty to Moscow. Russia is worried of "pan -Turkism" in Central Asia and of Turkish Islamic sympathy towards Chechnya. Gasprom provides a check on such moves.

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  85. Gasprom, which just sewed up Italy, too, was a PRIVATE company until Vlad the Impaler wrapped 'em up with "unpaid taxes' and did a USSR* gov't takeover. The western financial institutions which could have prevented it (with a little western gov't help) just stood by and watched, scratching their heads and saying "Go--oo--lly!" like Gomer Pyle.

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  86. turns out that those big rallys were organized by a few red groups, and la raz, but mainly, fundamentally, by an american labor union, the restaurant and service workers, or something. so much for labor's front against the illegals.

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  87. On Monday, Putin is scheduled to meet Vietnam‘s top leadership, including Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung and Communist Party chief Nong Duc Manh, although trade ties are a ghost of the Soviet-era relationship.

    Russian-Vietnamese trade volume of about 1.2 billion dollars a year is a fraction of US-Vietnamese turnover forecast to reach 10 billion dollars this year.


    APEC Meeting

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  88. the "Service Employees International Union" ? was it? link

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  89. Sam, as I posted, yesterday, I think it was, I like Dupont in the alt energy play. I, also, like ADM and the seed companies. I mentioned Monsanto.

    An interesting company to look at is Stirling. They have a huge Solar electricity facility coming on-line in partnership with S Cal Edison that could be the start of a monster. It starts cranking up in the spring.

    I like almost all of the companies except the pure play ethanol producers. Alcohol is alcohol; it's just a pure comodity. Hard to get the growth.

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  90. If you could find a small public company that's tied in with Nanosolar Corp you might hit a jackpot.

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  91. Big old PG&E is moving in with big bucks, too.

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  92. Personally, I think there will be an enormous business in the Micro-refinery (very small amounts) business. I'm kinda looking around for something, there. The American farmer will be THE main target group. If you hear of anything in this area, please post it here.

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  93. oil was off 2+ today--off the CPI 'slow-growth' scenario. like clockwork sometimes.

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  94. Buddy, I suspect those unions don't want them to be "guest" workers, they want them to be "citizens." They can organize "citizens" into their union; they can't do that with guest workers.

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  95. Russia's helping Iran build nuclear plants, so Iran can use less oil and gas on internal consumption and export MORE oil and gas to compete with Russia, only makes sense if you know Odysseus and use a Cyrillic alphabet.

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  96. ahem, I think somebody did post here that oil was going to be "cracking" pretty soon. What was it? about $75.00/barrel, then?

    Who Was that Masked Man? Oh well, I heard it was the only energy call he ever got right in his life, anyway. ;)

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  97. That's it, I'm sure. Non-unionized, they undermine the union. We need to remember that when we hear the unions being touted as America Firsters. It's the money, in this dust-up.

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  98. Mat, maybe Russia's just betting that we, or Israel, will blow the damned thing up, anyway.

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  99. solar com you was askin bout..

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  100. The Viking 32, a hybrid car that runs on electricity and biomethane, is a "sweet" car by anyone's standards.

    "It's a hot rod," Eric Leonhardt, director of the Vehicle Research Institute at Western Washington University, told an appreciative group of people crowded around the car during a recent biodiesel workshop at the Alcoa Intalco plant.


    The Real Bullshit

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  101. mat, it makes sense on the balance sheet, if not the income statement.

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  102. Rufus, I'd say Putin is banking on it.

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  103. if you are immortal (like a nation) and you have a certain finite amount of the stuff everybody wants, why sell it fast when you can sell it slow and thereby make it more valuable?

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  104. Yes, Buddy. That's why the Meeting with Olmert. Possibly as well an exchange of military info concerning Iran.

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  105. AXT Inc. Gotcha

    Are they doing business with Nanosolar Corp.?

    That's the solar technology I'm interested in, right now.

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  106. Speaking to Ynet, Sneh said he doesn't recommend military action against Iran but that he is aware of the dangers that lie in wait.

    "Iran can harm us and cause great damage, whether through terror it supports, or rockets it fires from Lebanon. We cannot damage it in a symmetrical manner and we need to be able to damage it in a similar manner," he said.


    At All Costs

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  107. AXT, Inc. (AXT) designs, develops, manufactures and distributes high-performance compound and single element semiconductor substrates comprising gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium phosphide (InP) and germanium (Ge). Its substrate products are used primarily in wireless communications, lighting display applications, and fiber optic communications.

    >>> think gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cell ;-)

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  108. Cramer explained it sometime back as "the stuff that makes fiberoptics flow". back to the flushing meta4.
    *******
    Sneh: Curb Iran 'all costs'
    Deputy defense minister tells Jerusalem Post about possible military action against Iran 'even the last resort is sometimes the only resort'

    what some have been saying--

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  109. the energy in the fiberoptic cable is subject to entropy, or somesuch, so AXTI makes some sort of little 'pumping station' actions happen along the line.

    My kind of dumbass visualization.

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  110. thing is, they're well-known already--so it's a play on numbers of subscribers, more'n anything. The broadband vs cable wars.

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  111. Buddy, Wish my Chem profs were as articulate. I might have stayed with it.

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  112. Thanks Mat; I'll check it out in the morning. I'll still want to make sure it's a direct supplier to nanosolar. There's a zillion solar companies; but that's the one I think has a chance to take off.

    I gotta shut down now. My computer's exhausted. Maybe I can get this posted before it goes down, again.

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  113. I was on the phone for a long time earlier tonight, with a Russian kid--she's a friend of, graduated with, my daughter & is interviewing for her first 'real' job here, and wanted some mkt info--but we got off into Russia & Putin, and she said that those 80% approval ratings for Putin are manure, strictly manufactured, and that ordinary russians (she and her mom were just there, in Moscow, for a few months) were fearful as hell of all Putin's 'moves' toward the 'old ways'. I know, one person, and an immigrant at that--but, just sayin.

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  114. I'll try to get one more up before I go. I posted a week or so, ago, about a utility in Az, NM,? that's producing it's own algae in partnership with someone. There's a problem with the algae stickin to the parts, and gummin up the works. Greatly lowers the efficiency. This company thinks they have it licked. If it does, it could be a "World-Changer."

    Theoretically, nothing comes within a thousand miles of algae for producing energy. It was posted at biopact a couple of weeks, ago. I'll try to find it.

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  115. thanks mat--but that's my total body of AXTI knowledge--

    Anyhoo, on Russia, people look @ GDP #s ands see that Russia's output is a tenth of ours, and think (*whew*).

    But, all that oil & gas in the ground (not to mention the raw mtrls & commodities in Siberia) is appreciating every day.

    They're like west Texas ranchers, not much cash flow but tremendous balance sheets, just holdin' & a-waitin'.

    Ronald Reagan, back in the day, called 'em "Upper Volta, with missiles", but now, with the global boom & rise in commodities values, they're a helluva lot more than that.

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  116. The problem for Empires like Russia China Iran etc, is that the "old ways" is all there is to keep the Empire intact.

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  117. You mean, to keep the Nomenclatura in power.

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  118. With democracy the Empire breaks apart.

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  119. yep--and the only loss is the investment in the old system.

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  120. unless you believe that a Putin is evil, you have to realize he muct have reason to believe that his people are better off with a strongman, than a rule-of-law.

    Wonder why he would feel that way?

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  121. Btw, the Canadian stock market been taking hits on account of commodities lately.

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  122. Hadn't thought of that--the history. That's what the russian young lady was trying to tell me tonight--that "the history is just so long, it defeats everything".

    She said, "americans cannot possibly understand, the country is too young".

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  123. His people comprise of 50 plus nationalities.

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  124. yeh, I've been watching the canadian dollar back down a little bit.

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  125. America is very unique. It is a place of national refuge.

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  126. The Russian language recognizes these "Russian" nationalities. Russian provides an expression to distinguish these nationalities though they may be considered "Russian".

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  127. The Kossacks who pacified Siberia did it almost exactly the way--and same time--as the USA settlers did the west. had to move the indigs outta the way. and the indigs are even the same racial stock on both continents, they look just like the Amerindians who came over the Bering land bridge.

    Yet the USSR commies beat us up over the indians, all the time. bastids, they did it too--and then the euro russians came in and pacified the Kossacks, like the USA did to the Confederate 'horse culture'.

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  128. Actually, it was the Lithuanian Poles that pacified the Cossacks. :D

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  129. There ya go--too much history, just like the lady said!

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  130. "During the 14th century, Poland and Lithuania fought wars against the Mongol invaders, and eventually most of Ukraine passed to the rule of Poland and Lithuania. More particularly, the lands of Volynia in the north and northwest passed to the rule of Lithuanian princes, while the south-west passed to the control of Poland (Galicia) and Hungary (Zakarpattya). Most of Ukraine bordered parts of Lithuania, and some say that the name, "Ukraine" comes from the local word for "border," although the name "Ukraine" was also used centuries earlier. Lithuania took control of the state of Volynia in northern/northwestern Ukraine, including the region around Kyiv (Rus'), and the rulers of Lithuania then adopted the title of ruler of Rus'. Poland took control of the region of Halychyna. Following the union between Poland and Lithuania, Poles, Germans, Armenians and Jews immigrated to the country."

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  131. you know, we americans get pissed off at russia and iran dealing with each other--but they have been, for more than a thousand years, already. They were already trading and cookin' up trouble, back when the Incas were the the western hemisphere's leading civilization. Or even the Toltecs.

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  132. The Russ and Persians shared a common enemy: the Turks and Mongols.

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  133. Mongols pretty much wrote Euro history, for a thousand years or so, didn't they. Mongols did in the first organized jihadis, the Assassins.

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  134. should've said, "first recorded terrorist cell", the Assassins.

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  135. The Alamo, to most Texans, is where "real" history began, LOL. 1836, barely yesterday.

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  136. All that pre 1776 across the ocean stuff, is just too vast to comprehend. yet every string playing today goes back, back, back, as far back as the written word.

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  137. yikes--2 a.m.--beddy-bye--later, alligator--

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  138. You're laughing, but it's 3:20 over here, and I've been listening to Mozart banging a hole in me head for the past 4 hrs. If Putin was such a sadomasochist, we might be in good shape. :D

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  139. That was a great thread, guys.

    Early in the thread I was thinking about hemp having more uses and cures than pond scum and magnets combined. Then late in the thread Rufus brings up the power of algae.

    Sam jumped in early with Iran and the thread took off for South Asia; Gog and Magog. Russia, Iran, Iraq, Turkey.
    **************************
    We have problems with Islam. We have problems in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan and in Pakistan. Those are the US problems. The Israelis have problems primarily in the west bank, Lebanon, Syria but throughout the middle east.

    Think we can have everything worked out four to six months?
    *****************************
    About that NATO in Canada meeting; Screw the damn Germans. I really don't think they will ever amount to anything but a thorn in the side and a pain in the ass.

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  140. Whit, you are right. It is one interesting eclectic dialectic. One great BS session.

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  141. Whit! Wow!

    You sure look better now than you used to. How old were you in that photo? 19?

    : ) Terrific job!

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  142. i cry over the indigs, too, bobal.
    but yesterday, the conversation was on russian history, and in the interests of drawing parallels between russian and american 19th century behavior, i guess i sounded a bit cavalier, a tad too lofty, a smidgen removed, from the sad history of the fall of the indians.

    will you be deeding your place back over to Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce, today, bobal?

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