COLLECTIVE MADNESS


“Soft despotism is a term coined by Alexis de Tocqueville describing the state into which a country overrun by "a network of small complicated rules" might degrade. Soft despotism is different from despotism (also called 'hard despotism') in the sense that it is not obvious to the people."

Sunday, December 20, 2009

Stealth Reparations - The Racial Aspect of Health Care

Like it or not and once again, a massive transfer of wealth is going to take place from the productive and responsible part of society to those perpetually at the government's tit.

Why will socialized health care disproportionately help one out of ten whites, two out of ten blacks and three out of ten Latinos? Mostly because of illegitimacy rates and existing government welfare that subsidizes bad behavior, but let's not be judgmental. You pay, don't judge.

Who will pay the freight for this expanded welfare program? Not the recipients.

Who will pay as the programs inevitably expand? You will.

Who will continue to vote for those who support the expansion of the welfare state? The non-payers of course. Rob from Peter to pay Pablo and you will always get Pablo's vote.

Are whites and Asians responsible for black illegitimacy rates close to 70 percent? Less than 40 percent of black children live in two-parent families. Of course they cannot afford health care, or education, or housing or food. That is why society invented the family structure. Who wrecked the family structure with financial rewards?

Who is responsible for that? Has government created that problem and will more government make the problem worse?

Yes and yes, but let's not discuss it less we offend.

__________________________________


Health reform's true colors

The real racial issue in this debate is not about Obama. It's about inequality. While all 46 million uninsured Americans would benefit from health-care legislation promoting high-quality, affordable health care, twice the share of the African American population and three times the proportion of Latinos would benefit. For people of color, health-care reform is not just important; it's urgent.

By Michael Bader Philly.com

The "tea party" protests that started last spring sparked a debate over whether racism was motivating the opposition to President Obama's health-care reform proposals. The issue was revived by a recent Internet advertisement depicting regular folks who oppose health-care reform saying facetiously, "I guess I'm racist."

While this offers another opportunity to have a national conversation about race and health care, I fear that we are once again going to fail to discuss the most important racial aspect of health care.

Rather than focusing on whether health-care reform opponents are somehow motivated by racism, we should be focusing on the fact that African Americans and Latinos have the most to gain from health-care reform - and the most to lose from its failure.

After the election of the first African American president, we shouldn't be surprised that race enters our national debates more easily. The "guess I'm racist" ad reflects frustration over the fact that criticisms of presidential initiatives are caught in that web. Sometimes legitimate policy criticism can be carelessly linked with the racist motivations of a small minority - such as those who forwarded e-mails depicting the president as an African witch doctor.

But race is part of the health-care debate in a more important way. Health care reveals our racial divide. Almost all of our institutions - including those involved in the delivery and financing of health care today - were built on a legacy that treated people of color as second-class citizens. While we have made great strides to move past this legacy, people of color are still paying the accumulated costs of past discrimination today.

Forty-six million Americans do not have health insurance, according to the most recent census estimates. About one in 10 whites is in that group, compared with two in 10 African Americans and three in 10 Latinos. And these disparities start early in life: While children are covered at higher rates than the U.S. population as a whole, racial inequality occurs in all age groups.

Thus, while all 46 million uninsured Americans would benefit from health-care legislation promoting high-quality, affordable health care, twice the share of the African American population and three times the proportion of Latinos would benefit. For people of color, health-care reform is not just important; it's urgent.

While the nation fretted about the total unemployment rate passing 10 percent last month, African Americans had passed that point more than a year earlier, with current rates reaching close to 16 percent. Latinos, meanwhile, face unemployment rates around 13 percent. The unemployed are, of course, far less likely to have health coverage.

Furthermore, both African Americans and Latinos are disproportionately represented in service-sector jobs that offer less security and fewer benefits, making it likely that any recovery will come later and be less complete for those groups.

Racism in our country has been defined by actions. But racism can also take the form of inaction in the face of inequality. In 1899, W.E.B. DuBois wrote in The Philadelphia Negro that the "most difficult social problem in the matter of Negro health is the peculiar attitude of the nation toward the well-being of the race. There have, for instance, been few other cases in the history of civilized peoples where human suffering has been viewed with such peculiar indifference."

Those fighting health-care reform now are showing the same "peculiar indifference" toward the welfare of blacks and Latinos in this country at the beginning of the 21st century that DuBois identified at the end of the 19th.

I doubt that most critics of health-care reform today are motivated to criticize the president because of his race. But without health-care reform, people of color will suffer the most. Is that outcome an acceptable by-product of inaction? That is the conversation about race and health care that we should be having.


164 comments:

  1. Way too much "Overthinking" going on, there.

    Let's give Kudos to Doug. He's one of the few "Honest" critics. He says, simply (and, correct me if I'm wrong, Doug:) "They (White, Black, or Pink w/purple polka dots) don't have "Health Care?" Tough Titties, I don't want to pay for it."

    THAT is a reasonable argument. It's the argument to which, probably, 90% of the HC Opponents, deep in their souls, actually resonate. I make a contrary argument, but I have to respect his.

    Throwing "race" into the mix is, almost, a non sequiter. It's, certainly, not useful.

    ReplyDelete
  2. For example: What if Doug says to me, "Well, hell, Rufus, an insurance card ain't no good if you can't get to the hospital; I guess they'll come back and want me to buy'em a car next year."

    Well, That argument does flow. It has a certain logic. It could, and probably will, start smaller. Like, "What kind of Policy?" "How much will it cover?" "Will it cover Sex Changes, or just Counseling?" "Viagra?" "Abortion?"

    Will it cover lung cancer for "smokers?" How about Diabetis for the Obscenely "Obese?"

    Will it affect "My" Coverage? Will my overweight ass take a hit? How deep will the government get in all this?

    I think these are "Logical" concerns. We might not like some of the answers. In fact, it's damned well guaranteed we're not going to like some of the outcomes.

    On the other hand, some people are living in pain, and, in some cases, dying for lack of health care. How far do we go? What's the balance?

    Whether two blacks are helped to one white is kind of a cheap distraction to most of us, I think.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Almost all of our institutions - including those involved in the delivery and financing of health care today - were built on a legacy that treated people of color as second-class citizens. While we have made great strides to move past this legacy, people of color are still paying the accumulated costs of past discrimination today.

    So, instead of go after "reparations", we'll rename different things including health care reform.

    ReplyDelete
  4. When I'm told that we're going to provide health care coverage for an additional 35 million people and at no additional cost, my BS radar goes off "bigtime". When I think you're a liar or a fool, I don't trust you with decisions affecting me.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ahh, the point is made, but then deuce says to ignore it.

    You see, the white majority, led by LBJ, that liberal Texican, set up the system of social payments, the ones that rewarded the behaviors that deuce finds objectionable.

    He then blames the victims of this payola, rather than those that paid for performance.

    But then tells us we should not judge.

    Mostly because of illegitimacy rates and existing government welfare that subsidizes bad behavior, but let's not be judgmental.

    Well, we should judge the performance of the Federals, by their results, not their intentions.

    We should not be judging the victims of fifty years of societal manipulations, but the manipulators.

    But it is so much easier to blame the victims, while saying we shouldn't.

    ReplyDelete
  6. We should not be judging the victims of fifty years of societal manipulations, but the manipulators.

    Are you saying that people aren't responsible for their own actions?

    The "victims" or beneficiaries are also part of the society.

    Being part of society, we can all be "judged."

    ReplyDelete
  7. The whole thing is wrong.

    We should be creating more doctors.

    But, I've said that before.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Based on the article, I agree with Duece, this looks like stealth reparations.

    ReplyDelete
  9. The victim of a rape, say one walking through a University campus, after the library closed, is guilty of poor judgment, guilty of walking alone.

    But the greater guilt lies with the Administration of that University, for leaving the library open and the campus unsecured.

    The greatest degree of guilt is allocated to the rapist

    The victim "played by the rules" but the rules did not the represent reality of the situation.

    The same can be said for the cultural and societal machinations that were foisted upon the minority communities.
    Those that "played by the rules" has their family units destroyed by Socialism.

    The Government set the rules and then raped the "beneficiaries" of their good intentions.

    The victims of these policies are no more to blame than the residents of Warsaw are to be blamed for the German policies affecting them, during WW2.

    The folks dispensing the largess, they were from the Government, and were there to help.

    The "unforeseen" consequences were not all that "unforeseen" but were of great consequence, none the less.

    ReplyDelete
  10. They "should" have known better, than to get on that "gravy train" to no where.

    But folks did as they were instructed to, instead.

    Who's to blame, for that?

    ReplyDelete
  11. I have a very soft spot in my heart for Romeo and Juliet

    It's the play I wrote my paper about for Dr. Stein, back in the day.

    ReplyDelete
  12. "Baby, we need to get married, now that we're pregnant"

    "But honey the Federal man will give us $1,000 per month if we're an unwed mother. Honey that's just "free" money. We'll live together, instead.
    Marriage is only a piece of paper, anyway."

    And then the Federal man sent proxies to their homes, to make sure there was no man present.

    The outcome was assured.
    Never unforeseen or unexpected.

    Now the Leviathan marches on, to the next phase of Federal Socialist machinations.

    ReplyDelete
  13. "And then the Federal man sent proxies to their homes, to make sure there was no man present."

    That's exactly the way it went down in Minnesota.
    Skin color was no issue.
    Teenage girls saw their gravy train and rode the high hard one at the same time.

    ReplyDelete
  14. The welfare was also opened to surrounding States. An influx of dysfuntional thinking individuals with children flooded the twin cities after that.
    The biggest healthcare need was behavioral health.
    Free the mind,.. and all of that.

    ReplyDelete
  15. In October 2008, the credit bubble burst. It blew-up right in our faces. Overnight the system was thrown into uncertainty and chaos. The Dems consolidated their power and are hell bent are carrying out their socialist agenda.

    For years, during the Bush administration, the Dems portrayed themselves as the real "fiscal conservatives", the most responsible fiscal agents for the US taxpayer. With rearranged priorities and "PayGo", they would put right the US fiscal house. Let's how much of our money they're going to steal for the "Pay" part of the "Go."

    The US is being spent into the poor house as the dollar is weakened by the day. Don't be surprised when the house of cards collapses.

    ReplyDelete
  16. The Democrats have a Federal agenda, whit.

    Always have.

    So, too, do the Republicans.
    There are a thousand points of light illuminating that truth.

    ReplyDelete
  17. The Democrats just push harder, but they're all going in the same direction.

    ReplyDelete
  18. And none of it means a thing, the housing crisis, whether stocks go up or down, the price of gold, but human emotion creates the meaning of anything there might be.

    ReplyDelete
  19. The silver lining is that the Federal leviathan may be destroyed by its own lust for power and control.

    We may need to hit rock bottom before we can get DC under control again.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Welcome Dougman (or Saxum). At first, I thought you were one of our regulars, Hawaii Doug.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Isn't it deliciously ironic that just about every global meeting on global warming is met with blizzards and record cold temperatures?

    ReplyDelete
  22. I should be so lucky to be in Hawaii.
    I'm the Doug that's freezing.

    ReplyDelete
  23. While the debate revolves around costs.

    Whether or not it is "affordable"

    Not whether the policy in question is "good", "right" or in the "best interests" of the people affected. Little matter whether the policy effects 'Guns' or 'Butter'.

    That is always seems to be the case. Even on the ObamaCare issue.
    The debate is fiscal, not philosophical nor even ideological.

    It's just about costs.

    My side lost, well before the debate even started, in DC.

    ReplyDelete
  24. No, Rat, you're wrong there. The Tea Parties are about much more than the dollars and cents. They are a response by common everyday Americans concerned that the Federal government is on the wrong track in every sense. Fiscal, constitutional, and moral.

    ReplyDelete
  25. It's a balmy 20 degrees at the Marriot City Center in Minneapolis.

    ReplyDelete
  26. First time I've ever enjoyed most of a Frank Rich Column:

    Tiger Woods, Person of the Year

    AS we say farewell to a dreadful year and decade, this much we can agree upon: The person of the year is not Ben Bernanke, no matter how insistently Time magazine tries to hype him into its pantheon.

    The men who played us for suckers, whether at Citigroup or Fannie Mae, at the White House or Ted Haggard’s megachurch, are the real movers and shakers of this century’s history so far. That’s why the obvious person of the year is Tiger Woods. His sham beatific image, questioned by almost no one until it collapsed, is nothing if not the farcical reductio ad absurdum of the decade’s flimflams, from the cancerous (the subprime mortgage) to the inane (balloon boy).

    As of Friday, the Tiger saga had appeared on 20 consecutive New York Post covers. For The Post, his calamity has become as big a story as 9/11. And the paper may well have it right. We’ve rarely questioned our assumption that 9/11, “the day that changed everything,” was the decade’s defining event. But in retrospect it may not have been. A con like Tiger’s may be more typical of our time than a one-off domestic terrorist attack, however devastating.

    What makes the golfing superstar’s tale compelling, after all, is not that he’s another celebrity in trouble or another fallen athletic “role model” in a decade lousy with them. His scandal has nothing to tell us about race, and nothing new to say about hypocrisy. The conflict between Tiger’s picture-perfect family life and his marathon womanizing is the oldest of morality tales.

    What’s striking instead is the exceptional, Enron-sized gap between this golfer’s public image as a paragon of businesslike discipline and focus and the maniacally reckless life we now know he led. What’s equally striking, if not shocking, is that the American establishment and news media — all of it, not just golf writers or celebrity tabloids — fell for the Woods myth as hard as any fan and actively helped sustain and enhance it.

    People wanted to believe what they wanted to believe. Tiger’s off-the-links elusiveness was no more questioned than Enron’s impenetrable balance sheets, with their “special-purpose entities” named after “Star Wars” characters. Fortune magazine named Enron as America’s “most innovative company” six years in a row. In the January issue of Golf Digest, still on the stands, some of the best and most hardheaded writers in America offer “tips Obama can take from Tiger,” who is typically characterized as so without human frailties that he “never does anything that would make him look ridiculous.”

    As cons go, Woods’s fraudulent image as an immaculate exemplar of superhuman steeliness is benign. His fall will damage his family, closest friends, Accenture and the golf industry much more than the rest of us. But the syndrome it epitomizes is not harmless. We keep being fooled by leaders in all sectors of American life, over and over.
    A decade that began with the “reality” television craze exemplified by “American Idol” and “Survivor” — both blissfully devoid of any reality whatsoever — spiraled into a wholesale flight from truth.
    ---
    Though the American left and right don’t agree on much, they are both now coalescing around the suspicion that Obama’s brilliant presidential campaign was as hollow as Tiger’s public image — a marketing scam designed to camouflage either his covert anti-American radicalism (as the right sees it) or spineless timidity (as the left sees it). The truth may well be neither, but after a decade of being spun silly, Americans can’t be blamed for being cynical about any leader trying to sell anything.

    As we say goodbye to the year of Tiger Woods, it is the country, sad to say, that is left mired in a sand trap with no obvious way out.

    ReplyDelete
  27. When I tell people Minnesota was the meeting place of three glaciers just 13,000 years ago their faces go blank.
    Then I tell'em,"Before Al Gore".
    A sheepish grin creeps across the face.
    They been hoodwinked. Wool over their eyes and the like.

    ReplyDelete
  28. And in Idaho, bob is running to the casino is short sleeves. Enjoying the 43 deg heatwave.

    ReplyDelete
  29. rufus: On the other hand, some people are living in pain, and, in some cases, dying for lack of health care. How far do we go? What's the balance?

    In countries which adopted socialism ahead of us, they are dying for lack of health care too. But since the rationing system is the market instead of a bureaucratic maze that draws it's own energy from the system, capitalism gets short shrift. There's nobody being paid to speak for the market, but they sure as hell are being paid to speak for the bureaucracy.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Whit,
    Sun Dec 20, 08:53:00 AM EST

    Our resident rodent inhabits an alternate universe.
    BHO satisfies his ego/need for attention by becoming POTUS.

    'Rat, by posting inanities.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Never argue with a socialist, T.
    Facts are of no consequence.

    ReplyDelete
  32. They are a response by common everyday Americans concerned that the Federal government is on the wrong track in every sense. Fiscal, constitutional, and moral.

    That is the feeling I've gotten from my minor association with it.

    Most of these folks are--just like you and me.

    The feeling is, Uncle Sam is becoming no longer a friend, not the good old Uncle of yesteryear.

    I hope, and think, there is going to be a lot of blowback in 2010.

    ReplyDelete
  33. rufus:

    "On the other hand, some people are living in pain, and, in some cases, dying for lack of health care. How far do we go? What's the balance?"

    Boo hoo hoo,
    Do it for the WOMEN AND CHILDREN!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Stalin did it for the Children!

    ReplyDelete
  35. Mao did it for the common folk.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Rufus apparently was mistaken about what he was fighting for.

    ReplyDelete
  37. "Throwing "race" into the mix is, almost, a non sequiter. It's, certainly, not useful."
    ---
    Jeeze, I agree with Rich and Rufus on the same day!

    ReplyDelete
  38. I've noticed that tribes are set up in a form of socialist hierarchy. Wealth is distributed downward along the tribal and clan lines.

    Perhaps Rufus is merely being true to his heritage.

    ReplyDelete
  39. ...but I have not read all the comments:

    "On the other hand, some people are living in pain, and, in some cases, dying for lack of health care. How far do we go? What's the balance?

    Whether two blacks are helped to one white is kind of a cheap distraction to most of us, I think.
    "
    ---
    The Balance should be
    THE CHOICE OF THE PATIENT AND HIS OR HER DOCTOR,

    NOT
    BARNEY FRANK AND CHUCK SHOEMEISTERSTEIN.
    (to get back in 'Rat's good graces)

    ReplyDelete
  40. No, Doug, I knew EXACTLY what I was fighting for. I was fighting to stay alive. Just like every Man-Jack in the Nam.

    I was fighting to get My Skinny White Ass back to the World.

    And, don't worry, T. I made several bucks in the insurance game, and I'm here to tell you: They got plenty of people "talking" for them.

    ReplyDelete
  41. whit: The US is being spent into the poor house as the dollar is weakened by the day. Don't be surprised when the house of cards collapses.

    "Time is running out," Obama tells us, claiming that America will go bankrupt if we don't allow the kleptocracy to take over the health care system. That's the same thing he said when he pushed through his stimulus, and at Copenhagen, and the surge in Afghanistan. But he's right, time is running out. Next November, turkeys and Democrats will be an endangered species.

    ReplyDelete
  42. TWICE AS MUCH STIMULUS DOUGH (our money) HAS BEEN SPENT IN BLUE DISTRICTS OVER RED ONES.

    Can't wait til "health care choices" are similarly decided.

    ReplyDelete
  43. "turkeys and Democrats will be an endangered species."
    ---
    Not if 'Rat gets his way and illegals become voters.

    ReplyDelete
  44. The Medicine Man treated ALL members of the Tribe, Whit. Or else, he was soon the late, dear, departed "Medicine Man."

    He might have fussed over the Chief a little more than the rest, but he shook the chicken feathers for everybody.

    ReplyDelete
  45. whit: Isn't it deliciously ironic that just about every global meeting on global warming is met with blizzards and record cold temperatures?

    I discerned the Creator's incredibly wry sense of humor long ago.

    ReplyDelete
  46. "I'm for Regularization"
    ---
    Like a Democrat is Pro-Life!

    ReplyDelete
  47. I don't, T. Battle lines have hardened and we're a sharply divided nation.

    Next November will be no slam-dunk and some pundits doubt that the Republicans will be able to take back anything.

    My fear is that there is very little moderate center in the Democrat party. I believe they're all given over to the dark side.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Huh,
    So you went to war for the same reason I submitted to the draft, Rufus, to try to save my (temporarily) bloated White Ass from the man.
    (I was a bartender in a Pizza Parlour.
    Not the best place to maintain your physique)

    ReplyDelete
  49. I discerned the Creator's incredibly wry sense of humor long ago.

    Ditto that and you discerned my thoughts as well.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Europe can afford healthcare for everyone; we can. We might have to cut back on the foreign "adventures" a bit. But, we could stand to do a little "cutting back," there, probably.

    We might need to cut back on the foreign oil, but we're going to be forced to do that, anyway. THAT, btw, will do more for the "Dollar" than anything else we could do.

    ReplyDelete
  51. I should pay an Obamacare penalty tax for all the Free Beer and Cheese I consumed at my place of employment.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Can Europe afford socialism? Not without the US subsidizing their medical technology, pharmaceutical research, prescription drugs, and defense spending.

    We'll see how good 'ol Europe fares when the US is broke and the world's wolves are once again free to prowl.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Oh no, I "went to war" because I got broke, drunk, flunked out of school, and enlisted (thought I'd look spiffy in them dress blues, you know.) *emphasis on the "drunk."

    Once I woke my putrid ass up in Vietnam, THEN the whole thing was a fight to get home.

    ReplyDelete
  54. Jeeze Rufus,
    Do you deny any truth to Quirk's 2018 link?
    Both Soc Sec and Medicare are actuarally broke in the immediate future.
    You spent your adult life on that stuff.
    (actuary tables)

    ReplyDelete
  55. "Oh no, I "went to war" because I got broke, drunk, flunked out of school, and enlisted (thought I'd look spiffy in them dress blues, you know.) *emphasis on the "drunk.""
    ---
    Sorry, I lied about my reason.
    You descibed my situation well, as well.

    I even managed to get fired at the Pizza Parlour after I got my draft notice.

    ReplyDelete
  56. I'd forgotten that I've been fired twice.

    The other time, I was towing my bosses sister behind my VW.
    ...until she hit a manhole cover.

    ReplyDelete
  57. (i left out that she was on a skateboard)
    No, I did not drag her to death!

    ReplyDelete
  58. I was eight years old when Vietnam was a wrap. I remember watching them bring bodies home to Andrews Air Force Base on television and I was annoyed because it pre-empted my End of Night soap opera on ABC just like all the Watergate stuff. Now, of course, I'm an American Legionnaire, and so is my dog, he stops at every post.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Well, with the demise of the "Public Option" the Medical Technology, and pharmaceutical research industries are safe.

    We need to do something about pharmaceuticals, however. The logical answer is to put an end to "Quantity Pricing." One Price, all buyers. The Euros would pay more, the self-insured in the U.S. would pay less.

    That "Defense" free ride, definitely, needs to come to an end.

    ReplyDelete
  60. "We need to do something about pharmaceuticals, however.

    The logical answer is to put an end to "Quantity Pricing." One Price, all buyers.

    The Euros would pay more, the self-insured in the U.S. would pay less.
    "
    ---
    Yup.
    Not bettin on the Dems to do it tho.

    ReplyDelete
  61. ...although they do respond well to the entreaties of those with the big bucks.

    ReplyDelete
  62. No, Doug, I don't deny that. I just deny that it's a problem. We'll slip another penny on the kids' social security, and medicare premiums, and all will be copacetic.

    And, don't worry about the kids. They'll be busy living the good life in this Great Country we built.

    Our only Real problem, and it IS a real problem, is finding something to keep'em busy.

    ReplyDelete
  63. I wouldn't bet on the Dems, or Pubs, either one, doing it. Too simple.

    ReplyDelete
  64. Funny thing is, it wouldn't cost the drug companies a penny.

    ReplyDelete
  65. You reminded me of this, T:

    Kangaroo Attack

    'roo holds dog underwater with front feet.
    Man tries to save dog, 'roo almost eviscerates man with hind feet.

    ReplyDelete
  66. Rufus, the Rose Colored Glasses Reindeer!

    It's all good!

    ReplyDelete
  67. I think I'm stuck in the wrong country. I'd like to hear more about that "gave as good as I got" deal.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Shit, we got it "made in the shade," Doug.

    "Made in the freakin' shade."

    ReplyDelete
  69. An America Hating Marxist for POTUS and we got it made in the shade?

    ReplyDelete
  70. The bar has been lowered to
    Rose Colored Levels!

    ReplyDelete
  71. Rose-Colored should go to the back of the bus.
    Rosa tells me so.

    ReplyDelete
  72. I worry about our assembly lines. They're outdated. And, our Education System isn't keeping up with what's needed.

    If we're going to continue to live this much better than the rest of the world we're going to have to stay on the cutting edge of "efficiency;" and, right now, that's looking problematic.

    And, yes, the increased spending on Health Care DOES Stress the System.

    ReplyDelete
  73. This could explain Doug's anal myopia


    jes kiddink!

    ReplyDelete
  74. I worry about Oil going back to $140.00/bbl and throwing us back into recession. 10 years of bobbing in and out of recession could call all bets. THAT'S what Worries me.

    ReplyDelete
  75. U.S. Companies Shut Out as Iraq Auctions Its Oil Fields

    Those who claim that the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003 to get control of the country's giant oil reserves will be left scratching their heads by the results of last weekend's auction of Iraqi oil contracts:

    Not a single U.S. company secured a deal in the auction of contracts that will shape the Iraqi oil industry for the next couple of decades.

    Two of the most lucrative of the multi-billion-dollar oil contracts went to two countries which bitterly opposed the U.S. invasion — Russia and China — while even Total Oil of France, which led the charge to deny international approval for the war at the U.N. Security Council in 2003, won a bigger stake than the Americans in the most recent auction. "

    ---
    uh,
    That would be...
    Rufus!
    But I repeat myself.
    ...as does he.

    ReplyDelete
  76. Thanks for that, Whit.
    I did not know that:

    "• Hawaii now has the shortest school year in the nation after the state and teachers union agreed to shutter schools for 17 days a year, leaving 171,000 students without class on most Fridays. Negotiations to reopen them collapsed last week."

    If teachers gave a SHIT about the kids, they'd volunteer to have ONE teacher per 200 kids sit in the school library for ONE day or 2 days a year for what we used to call STUDY HALL.

    Instead, they tell our (Republican) Governor,

    "WE WANT THE MONEY!"

    ReplyDelete
  77. Isn't Hawaii in the top three or four states as regards "Income per Capita?"

    ReplyDelete
  78. Our Guv,

    Linda Lingle was a union type in college.

    The lord smote her with the truth, somewhere along the line.

    ...probly while living as a hippy on Molokai.
    pop. 6,000?

    ReplyDelete
  79. Income?
    We don't need no stinkin income!
    We're tired.
    er ...retired.
    Or, workin for the govt.

    ReplyDelete
  80. The war was to "protect" the ME oil; not to "own" it.

    Those oil deals are "lucrative" for the Iraqis, not so much for the oil companies. They put up the money, take the many, and varied "risks," and get about $1.50/bbl.

    "Commercial" companies want to see a good chance of "getting their money back" within a year, or two. These deals just don't meet that criterion.

    ReplyDelete
  81. CLOSE:

    Molokai

    MolokaŹ»i is the fifth largest of the Hawaiian Islands with a land area of 260 square miles. Molokai 38 miles long and 10 miles wide.

    Population:

    As of the 2000 U.S. Census: 7,404 (2000 census). Nearly 40% are of Hawaiian descent, thus its former nickname, "The Most Hawaiian Island." Over 2,500 of the island's inhabitants have more than 50% Hawaiian blood.

    Filipino is the next largest ethnic group.

    T claims her kind will cut the tires of the white tourist.

    ReplyDelete
  82. Fuck, Rufus,
    You're a one-trick pony.
    It's ALL Good!

    ReplyDelete
  83. When wer're both drunk,
    we agree!
    Skool!
    ...or whatever they do in Denmark.

    ReplyDelete
  84. I should have said: Commercial "Oil" Companies want to get their investment back in a couple of years.

    ReplyDelete
  85. You go ahead and get drunk. I'm going back to bed. Nighty nite (as the say in Dixie.) :)

    ReplyDelete
  86. Property values Tripled in a decade in Hawaii.

    ...now they're back to double.
    Govt runs on property tax here, but somehow they cannot squeak by.

    ...that's why Rufus has so much faith in the Govt. running everything!

    ReplyDelete
  87. BACK to bed???
    What frigging time is it in M...?
    5:47 am here,
    'bout time for me to hit the sack for the FIRST Time.

    ReplyDelete
  88. "Let's give Kudos to Doug. He's one of the few "Honest" critics."

    A little judgmental this morning aren’t we Rufus. Now defining what is an "honest" opinion?

    I agree that, in my opinion, race is at best a peripheral issue in people's thinking about the healthcare legislation. Merely a statistical factor determining who the winners and losers are under the bill. The cynical view would be that the healthcare legislation is merely about votes and how to get them.

    However, you are begging the question when you lump the supporters of the bill on one side and those that oppose it on the other merely on the basis of "cost". Most Americans who oppose the bill do so for two main reasons if you can believe the polls. They do not believe the cost estimates but they do believe that their current coverage will be impacted negatively.

    However, within the majority that oppose this legislation, people have numerous other reasons that would cause them to oppose it regardless of cost. There are moral issues (abortion), state’s rights issues (unfunded mandates), bureaucratic nannyism (government dictates on what has to be in your policy), “death panels” (government dictates on what won’t be paid for), expansion of government (you know this bill is merely the beginning), pc/affirmative action BS (i.e. on hiring, "develop standards for the measurement of gender" because male and female are no longer adequate), the process (typical big government: $100 million to Nelson for his vote, $100 million to Landrieu for her vote, bribe Pharma “give us $80 billion and we’ll drop reform”, bribe the doctors “don’t worry about that $250 million cut; we’ll just put it off like we have for the last 10 years”, bribe the insurers “you’ll be ok, we’ll guarantee you 30–40 million new, mostly young customers), and on and on.

    The last one is the one that gets me from a libertarian point of view. That you can penalize, fine or throw in jail, someone for not buying health insurance. Good lord. (Please, no inane arguments about car insurance.)

    That and the hypocrisy, the arrogant condescension, the patronizing that we get from these bozos as they try to convince us that they know what they are doing and it is the “right thing” for us.

    Of course, from a practical standpoint, Doug’ argument on cost is the best one. We can’t afford it. Rufus argument that it will cost everyone $2,000 is off the mark in a couple of ways. First it is a static number and will escalate rapidly over time; and secondly, it will not cost “everyone” $2,000. A good portion of people will be subsidized and will pay nothing and their cost will be added on to what “everybody else” pays. And that is just on an individual basis. As a country, this plan will push us one more step towards fiscal disaster.

    Back to the race issue, Rat’s arguments for pitying the poor victim are specious. It’s an amalgam of the worst of both worlds. Undoubtedly, there is a need for a safety net in any society. However, beyond a certain point, the government programs and their “victims” represent a symbiotic relationship. In fact, the government and its “victims” become co-dependent enablers.

    The reference to the rape victim is merely a red herring.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  89. Red Herrings and Blue States:

    Blue States win under Obama.

    (as they did under the compassionate one, "W")

    ReplyDelete
  90. Damn! There's no peppermint schnapps to go in my hot chocolate ,with whipped cream on top, after shoveling out 20 inches of snow this morning.

    ReplyDelete
  91. Ah, yes but butterscotch schnapps works the same. Yum.

    ReplyDelete
  92. I got to wrtie a check for property taxes and put it in the mailbox at the Post Office by midnight.

    ouch, that's worse than twenty inches of snow

    ReplyDelete
  93. The solution to the government going insane is for us to go Galt...

    I personally have cut back on all charities and time donated to social justice causes.

    They say that 15% of the people donate most of the time and money to these causes....

    So I am advocating, to those I know, in the 15%, to worry about themselves 1st and foremost...

    Screw the masses....

    ReplyDelete
  94. Doug: T claims her kind will cut the tires of the white tourist.

    Only if Bubba tries to park his "Pussy Wagon" at our Amazon bar, trying to get laid. Our kind doesn't cotton to that. But mostly the tires that get slashed are rentals, so it's no big deal.

    ReplyDelete
  95. Looking over my property taxes yesterday, I didn't see any reductions. There weren't any increases, they don't have that much of brass balls, but no decreases either, which there should have been, what with the property sales prices being down somewhat. I imagine the county commissioners are going to get a lot of protests this year. You can protest the values used to the commissioners here, I've only done that once, and won, too, though I don't have the setup, and sales figures to do it every year. Some of the realtors do.

    It helps if you have rpublican county commissioners, which we usually have. Right now we're 2 to 1, R vs Donk.

    ReplyDelete
  96. Melody, try a shot of Buttershots and a shot of Bailey's Irish Creme on top, but make sure they're both well chilled in the freezer first. This is called a Buttery Nipple.

    ReplyDelete
  97. Try a shot of Chivas Regal and Mountain Dew, over some ice. This is called covering the waterfront, from the fine and fancy to the flophouse. From Wall Street financeer to Idaho farmer.

    ReplyDelete
  98. No, doug, I have never advocated for illegal immigrants to become citizens of the US.

    Not once.

    Just legal residents.

    ReplyDelete
  99. I call it a slippery nipple and that's why I have the butterscotch in the cabinet. Delish...I don't have any Baily's right now so it went into my hot chocolate.

    I also like blow jobs. Baily's, kahlua and whipped cream. The secret though is to do it with no hands.

    ReplyDelete
  100. Chivas Regal recently sponsored The Black Eyed Peas, Robbie Williams, Beyonce’s, and Christina Aguilera’s tours in Asia.

    There, you can't beat that.

    ReplyDelete
  101. Oh, your're a whiskey drinker.

    ReplyDelete
  102. I had a blow job with no hands once, I liked it, too. And there was cream at the end.

    ReplyDelete
  103. Well Bob, I guess it was done right, then.

    ReplyDelete
  104. Must have been. I felt all stirred up, like in a blender, then powie.

    ReplyDelete
  105. Not a red herring, at all, Quirk.

    If you believe Thomas Sowell and VDH, the black community was improving itself, through the 1950s and '60s. I believe that the statistics back this up. There was no major statistical difference 'tween the races in out of wedlock births nor children raised by single parents.

    After the introduction of LBJ's "War on Poverty" that began to change. I believe it was whit that posted about the Alinsky types gaming the welfare system, to the point of bankrupting New York City.

    It has morally bankrupted the communities it was designed to improve.

    That requires realistic judgment, not a blind eye

    Is there now a symbiotic relationship between the administrators and the beneficiaries?
    Without a doubt.

    The Stockholm Syndrome is how law enforcement types describe that type of psychological condition.

    But the professional "beneficiaries" are the real victims of the Federal system, even while they think they are exploiting it.

    Besides and to the point, there was no symbiotic relationship, until the Federals first planted and then nourished the societal parasite.

    ReplyDelete
  106. Even doug has commented on the pre and post "War on Poverty" performance of the black community, how the Government attempt at help, didn't.

    In fact it made the problems worse.

    Rewarding behaviors that had always been considered culturally detrimental, previously. Such as out of wedlock births and single parenting.

    While not promoting marriage and family stability.

    By design, with knowledge and fore thought on the part of the Federal planners and administrators of the programs.

    ReplyDelete
  107. Those minority communities have been raped, while they were paid a pittance for the privilege.

    ReplyDelete
  108. You make a lot of sense today, Rat, but

    By design, with knowledge and fore thought on the part of the Federal planners and administrators of the programs.

    I'm not sure about this. These things have a kind of drift to them, and I'm not sure there has been much forethought.

    Though, you may be right.

    ReplyDelete
  109. What animates the Canadian approach to health care is that EVERYONE deserves EQUAL access to health care. Everything then flows from that.

    I shake my head in amazement that the claim is made that there will be no extra cost in providing more health care to more folk in the US, especially when the steps to mitigate costs are so weak. I again restate my puzzlement at how everyone can be forced to buy something. That could bring up some interesting court challenges. Better to just tax folk and move on.

    Doug's lament that health choices should be simply between a Doctor and a Patient. Nice thought but terribly naive - one must consider one's pocketbook, the doctor's pocketbook, the insurance companies pocketbook (doctors liability insurance and your insurance), the HMO's pocketbook,the availability and probability that any potential approach might work, ect. Hardly a simple doctor/patient consideration.

    ReplyDelete
  110. What animates the Canadian approach to health care is that EVERYONE deserves EQUAL access to health care. Everything then flows from that.

    Right, Ash, except the elderly, and when it gets too expensive.

    Where or where is that video of Frankenstein Immanuel telling the students, we'll just let the old folks die.

    ReplyDelete
  111. A glimmer of good sense.

    I again restate my puzzlement at how everyone can be forced to buy something.

    ReplyDelete
  112. Q, it's going to cost around $200 Billion to insure that 30 Million people. Some money will be collected from taxes, some from fines, some from higher premiums; but, in the end, someone has to, someway, pay $200 B.

    That's about 1.5% of GDP. About 7.5% of "taxes collected;" except it won't all come from taxes. Some of it will come from higher premiums on the presently, insured.

    Don't get me wrong. I'm not pooh-poohing $200 Billion. It's a Big Number. But, it's doable. And, it's something we "should" do.

    At least, that's MY story. And I'm sticking to it. :)

    ReplyDelete
  113. Oh, I was figuring that 100 million of us will "bear the freight."

    ReplyDelete
  114. You guys are awfully easy to bewilder.

    You're forced into "buying" Social Security, and Medicare, aren't you?

    You're forced to buy Auto Insurance, aren't you?

    You're forced to buy a "Performance" bond in order to do certain types of business, right?

    ReplyDelete
  115. Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered

    Ella.

    I got to write this damned check. I'm just putting it off.

    Time to act, now.

    ReplyDelete
  116. Baily's, kahlua and whipped cream. The secret though is to do it with no hands.

    O what was that recipe
    From the girl shoveling snow
    20 inches of it
    As the temps go low

    Look mother, see
    No hands
    That is a secret
    Only a man understands


    Though


    The Kahlua, cream and
    Baily's
    Gets mixed in my mind
    And to unstir it would be
    A favor very kind

    So I think it best
    If a vixen come west
    And teach me
    Her recipe
    Really really slow

    ReplyDelete
  117. Diana Krall...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMD__Q_VraM

    ReplyDelete
  118. So imagine walking outside in the late morning and noticing that the rear right tire on one dip-plated Suburban is flat. Then quickly noticing that the rear right tire on the other dip-plated Suburban is flat. Inside your compound. In the middle of literally fucking nowhere. (But not far from the MOD's place, where an attempt was foiled Easter of this year.)

    Takes a lot in almost any circumstances to make me go, "Um. Hm."

    For awhile there I was thinking, "I wanna read the news. I really don't want to be the news."







    And - separate issue - let me just say once again to every single Colombian on the road everywhere: You fucker. What is your fucking problem? You *deserve* to have fingernails pulled.

    ReplyDelete
  119. Well, bob, that is one of the nicest things you have said to me in along while, thank you.

    Remember if you will the folk that LBJ had around him. The "Best and the Brightest" of the Ivy League, from JFK's administration. Then he had his Texican friends and his Senate network. They were smart enough to know that if you paid women to have babies, without husbands, then they'd have babies and no husbands.

    Any politician from Texas could have told you that, and LBJ was all about expanding Federal power.

    ReplyDelete
  120. They were trying to create that symbiotic relationship that Quirk thinks is part of the cause, rather than an effect of the Federal machinations, during the 1960s and 70s. Setting a subculture in place that now spans generations, and is and has been solidly voting en bloc for the Democrats.

    LBJ was a masterful politician, he knew the real deal of what they were doing.

    ReplyDelete
  121. Oh my, Trish, did your weekend not go well?

    ReplyDelete
  122. As to the fuel for generators, propane is the cleanest and easiest to manage. Especially if it is a permanent installation.

    ReplyDelete
  123. ”Those minority communities have been raped, while they were paid a pittance for the privilege.”

    When those being screwed are paid for it, there are many words used to describe the relationship. Rape isn’t one of them.

    With regard to the actual rape situation you outlined, I called it what it was, a red herring, because it had nothing to do with the subject at hand, race and healthcare.

    With regard to your calling the recipients of welfare victims, it reflects the fuzzy thinking that got us into this situation.

    Most people have problems at times in their lives and need public assistance. I’ve already said we need a safety net. Right now we are going through a crisis that demands even more. I think the extended unemployment benefits extensions just passed are a good thing given the hopefully temporary job situation. Others need longer term help, for disabilities for instance. However, there are limits.

    We are talking 40 to 50 years here. When one group accepts to live off the dole for a generation and then passes on that ethic to the next generation, it is not “victimhood” it is acceptance of a lifestyle.

    Are government policies at fault? Of course. However, calling these people victims does nothing to alleviate their situation: it merely provides them with one more excuse to justify their lifestyle choice. Basically, by calling them victims you also are acting as an enabler.

    Just my opinion.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  124. Then the propane can be used in other energy areas, like heating and food refrigeration.

    The technology is simple, the storage tanks readily available.

    Truck delivers to your site when you need it, just like water or animal feed.

    ReplyDelete
  125. It was marvelous.

    Until shortly before lunch today.






    "Fuck" happens. What can you do?

    ReplyDelete
  126. I would agree, Quirk, that it is an acceptance of a lifestyle. No doubt of that, but it is a Government approved and funded lifestyle.

    It did not exist before the Federals introduced it.
    That is when the crime took place.
    That some people prefer to be victims, well known to the social planners of the day.

    That is the point, we agree on the fifty years of dysfunction, but the cause of it, that was by Federal design, to influence the body politic, for generations.
    They were successful.

    FDR did it with Social Security and LBJ trumped him with welfare dependency, as an effective political tool.

    While both expanded the Federal's embrace of an expanding social mandate as an avenue to authority. Now, with BHO that embrace is extended to Health Care and Medical Insurance.

    And that's the way it is.

    ReplyDelete
  127. That poem wasn't meant for you, Rat:)

    ReplyDelete
  128. I don't disagree (up to a point).

    But your argument falls short in assigning all the fault to the government.

    It ignores freedome of choice. We all have free will. In the short run, we may not many options. However, over a generation?

    Over time, these people are free to make choices that would get them off the dole. It might be tough, but they sure as hell wouldn't be the first to have to bust their ass. Given that reality, they are not victims.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  129. The Lockerbie bomber had £1.8m ($2.9 million USD) in a Swiss bank account when he was convicted eight years ago, it has been revealed.

    The Crown Office, Scotland’s equivalent of the Crown Prosecution Service, has confirmed it refused to grant bail to Abdel Baset al-Megrahi as recently as November last year because of concerns he might try to gain access to the money.

    The existence of such a large sum in a personal account casts doubt on claims by the Libyan government that Megrahi was a low-ranking airline worker.

    The disclosure also raises further questions about the wisdom of the Scottish government in releasing the bomber, who has terminal prostate cancer, on compassionate grounds in August.

    ReplyDelete
  130. This is for our resident Grasshopper, Rufus.

    The Ant and the Grasshopper Obama Style


    .

    ReplyDelete
  131. Tomorrow is the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere. Shortest day for us and longest day (middle of summer) for Trish and her neighbors.

    We're having a hell of a weekend weatherwise up here, Trish. Up to 2 feet of snow from the eastern shore up. More bad weather expected later in the week could really screw up Christmas travel.

    ReplyDelete
  132. "...longest day (middle of summer) for Trish and her neighbors."

    Trish's husband's response, "Uh, I thought that was today."

    : )

    ReplyDelete
  133. Oddly enough, it's moderate (high 30's low 40's) here right now, and no snow cover at all. It all melted away.

    ReplyDelete
  134. God forbid tomorrow be even longer.

    ReplyDelete
  135. :)

    If he had to change the tires, that could lengthen the day.

    ReplyDelete
  136. We have a star, not a cross, not a sign of David, up on the Lewiston Hill here. Great big thing. At night, it seems to hang there, unattached to anything. Almost floating.

    Always been there, long as I can remember, turned on, this time of year. Kind of nice, I like it.

    ReplyDelete
  137. Joking aside, we get preciously little variation in daylight hours. Miss it terribly in the would-be "summertime."

    ReplyDelete
  138. If he had to change the tires, that could lengthen the day.

    Sun Dec 20, 07:46:00 PM EST

    No tires were changed today, though thought was given to it. We drove on questionably reinflated tires and had they gone flat along the way, we had good reason to drive those fuckers until they quite literally would move no further.

    Ten, maybe fifteen, minutes of ticking clock roadside. In hairy asscrack.

    Drive-flat tires, baby.

    "Just get off the X," as they say. "Just get off the X."

    ReplyDelete
  139. Fine tuning my poem--now called--

    BLOWBACK

    "Baily's, kahlua and whipped cream. The secret though is to do it with no hands."

    Melody



    O what was that recipe
    From the girl shoveling snow
    20 inches of it
    As the temps swing so low

    Look mother, see
    No hands!
    That is a secret
    Only man understands!


    Though


    The Kahlua, cream and
    Baily's
    Get mixed in my mind
    And to unstir it would be
    A favor so kind

    Thus I think it best
    If a vixen come west
    And teach me
    Her recipe
    Really really slow!

    ReplyDelete
  140. Bob, that actually is a really good poem.

    ReplyDelete
  141. All inspired by thee, written for thee, sent to thee, O My Darling!

    I've signed my tax checks, got to go mail them now. It really hurts.

    ReplyDelete
  142. Print it out, fold it carefully, and tuck it secretly, between thy lovely breasts.

    ReplyDelete
  143. Ants, grasshoppers, sounds like a cute little "childrens'" story.

    I was reading a while back about the fall of the Roman Empire. Many people think it just "lost its Soul." The Rich got too Rich, too Powerful, too Arrogant.

    Too many Legionnaires lost their farms while they were off fighting wars, and were forced into indigence. The Weather went bad, and the balance of trade went sour. The bankers had corrupted the currency.

    Nothing about ants, and grasshoppers, though. What was that guy's name, again?

    ReplyDelete
  144. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ot70G4wSQi0&feature=fvst

    ReplyDelete
  145. WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The White House on Sunday sought to preserve the fragile alliance of Democratic liberals and moderates backing broad healthcare reform legislation, with tough decisions looming on abortion and a new government-run insurance program.

    Republicans vowed to continue to fight the measure, but admitted they probably were helpless to stop it in the Senate.


    Which means they cannot stop it, anywhere.

    "Something" is going to pass.

    ReplyDelete
  146. Here's a 'children's story' for you, Ruf.

    From the mythology and human experience of my Nez Perce neighbors.

    Ant and Yellowjacket

    But it ain't 'just for kids'.

    ReplyDelete
  147. (Sighs.)

    Okay. The Colombian soldiers on the side of the road giving us the thumbs up? That was nice.

    The rest of you Colombians, trying to kill us and one another? Not so nice. Won't miss that. Really won't miss that.

    Need some intensive driving lessons, you people.

    ReplyDelete
  148. Shakespeare is a really great poet.

    When emotion and passion takes hold of Juliet, and becomes her very self, her language changes, from the controlled, taught, to her true expression.

    Our bard got that.

    ReplyDelete
  149. "Ants, grasshoppers, sounds like a cute little "childrens'" story...

    I was reading a while back about the fall of the Roman Empire. Many people think it just "lost its Soul." The Rich got too Rich, too Powerful, too Arrogant.

    Too many Legionnaires lost their farms while they were off fighting wars, and were forced into indigence. The Weather went bad, and the balance of trade went sour. The bankers had corrupted the currency."


    This from the man who says

    "I just deny that it's a problem...all will be copacetic."

    The fact that ever since the payroll taxes and medicare premiums started to be pumped into the general fund we have created a giant ponzi scheme the results of which are about to come due?

    "Hey, not a problem."

    The loss of good paying manufacturing jobs?

    "No problem."

    The fact that median income hasn't increased over the past 30 years.

    "No problem. Look, 30 years ago we didn't all have air conditioning and big screen TV's. Life is good. Better than ever."

    Yea, but 30 years ago, we didn't have two worker families. You didn't have kids living with their parents into their thirties. We didn't have average credit card balances of $10,000. You didn't have 75% of women of working age actually working. We're stretched. How are we going to keep up over the next thirty years.

    "Well we could do away with those crazy child labor laws."

    Well, what about healthcare reform? Even the most optimistic estimates show the cost will increase the percentage of GDP it represents from 18% to 22%.

    "That's only 4%. That doesn't sound like much to me. Lighten up."

    But that's on top of trillion dollar deficits. The costs of ongoing wars. Unfunded mandates of $100 trillion. Actual obligations projected to reach 100%of GDP in the relatively near future.

    ”…don't worry about the kids. They'll be busy living the good life in this Great Country we built.'

    Our only Real problem, and it IS a real problem, is finding something to keep'em busy.”


    But….

    "Shit, we got it made in the shade,..Made in the freakin' shade."


    And the voice of the Grasshopper was heard in the land.


    :)


    .

    ReplyDelete
  150. New post on the EB, you know my pet peeve is exceeding two hundred posts on one topic.

    ReplyDelete
  151. "...you know my pet peeve is exceeding two hundred posts on one topic."

    Strikes me as a bit anal T.

    :)

    ReplyDelete
  152. Excellent commentary, Quirk.

    ReplyDelete
  153. BLOWBACK

    "Baily's, kahlua and whipped cream. The secret though is to do it with no hands."

    Melody



    O what was that recipe
    From the girl shoveling snow
    20 inches of it
    As the temps swing so low

    Look mother, see
    No hands!
    That is a secret
    Only man understands!


    Though


    The Kahlua, cream and
    Baily's
    Get mixed in my mind
    And to unstir it would be
    A favor so kind

    Yet I think it best
    If a vixen come west
    And teach me
    Her recipe
    Really really slow


    Substituting yet for thus

    ReplyDelete
  154. BLOWBACK

    "Baily's, kahlua and whipped cream. The secret though is to do it with no hands."

    Melody



    O what was that recipe
    From the girl shoveling snow
    20 inches of it
    As the temps swing so low

    Look mother, see
    No hands!
    That is a secret
    Only man understands!


    Though


    The Kahlua, cream and
    Baily's
    Get mixed in my mind
    And to unstir it would be
    A favor so kind

    Yet I think it best
    If a vixen come west
    And teach me
    Her recipe
    Really really slow
    And personally.

    ReplyDelete
  155. 4. Yes We Did:

    You racist oppressors can whine forever about times gone by. President Obama rules this country now and the Progressives control the government. They are leading us all forward into a new world of peace and justice.

    The time of the racist white male oppressor has gone, never to return. Just shut up and pay your reparations.

    Dec 19, 2009 - 3:58 pm

    ReplyDelete