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Monday, April 28, 2008

So Much for Conspiracy Theories


9/11 Conspiracy Theories 'Ridiculous,' Al Qaeda Says

19 comments:

  1. Did Hillarly pay Wright for this fiasco? Did Obama put him up to it himself, so he can finally disown Wright, ending the talk during the general?
    Did Wright do it himself, wanting to force the party irrevocably to the left? Is Wright simply nuts? The conspiracy theories abound over at B.C.

    Calling Occam.

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  2. For Rufus

    Is McCain a little touched? Does he live comfortably in his own ZIP code? Is his tray table upright and locked on takeoff? Are there bats in the belfry? Etc.

    Is he bat shit crazy?

    Should we worry?

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  3. Why is the guy who planned the 9-11 attacks so close-minded to the theory that the government did a controlled demolition?

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  4. Here's another conspiracy for Trish to chew and moo on:

    WASHINGTON - CIA Director Michael Hayden said Monday that the alleged Syrian nuclear reactor destroyed by an Israeli airstrike in September would have produced enough plutonium for one or two bombs within a year of becoming operational.

    U.S. intelligence and administration officials publicly disclosed last week their assessment that Syria was building a covert nuclear reactor with North Korean assistance. They said it was modeled on the shuttered North Korean reactor at Yongbyon, which produced a small amount of plutonium. The Syrian site, they said, was within weeks or months of being operational.

    “In the course of a year after they got full up they would have produced enough plutonium for one or two weapons,” Hayden told reporters after a speech at Georgetown University.

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  5. That means the reason we haven't bombed the Iranian reactor is that...it's not the kind that makes bomb material.

    Why didn't we bomb the Yongbyon site? The Norks would have retaliated by shelling Seoul, maybe with chem.

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  6. After seeing some video I can see how the collapse of Building 7 might be thought to have been a controlled demojob.

    Why assume it was the US government that did the controlled demolition of Building 7?

    Even if that collapse was a controlled demo, which it may have been, where is the evidnce the US government was behind it?

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  7. People, let’s not get over-excited about current events and ‘pressures’ from the neighbours. They are trying to score cheap political points at home by criticizing President Mugabe.

    They are not concerned about Zimbabwe.

    Let us sit down as a nation, and be realistic about our situation and find our own solutions to our problems.


    Time is Precious

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  8. Mat,
    You are full of Shiite!
    I have it on good authority that the Jew Jet Jockeys dropped a few fuel tanks, a not unusual occurrence whatsoever.
    A Nuke Plant?
    Not a chance!

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  9. 'Rat,
    It was my understanding that Rudy's emergency reserve Diesel tank for his emergency op center was involved in bringing that building down.
    What was it, 9,000 gal, or so, of Diesel?
    If so, that would produce as much heat as them Jetplanes, I'd guess.
    Too lazy to look it up right now.

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  10. Always look where you least expect. It was the Icelanders that did 9-11, with a little help from some unemployed Basque separatists. It may seem improbable at first glance, but that is why it was such a sublime job. Think about it.

    And it wasn't diesel. It was cod oil.

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  11. And the rationale was economic. They wanted to drive up the cost of hydrocarbons so they could sell the electricity generated by their geothermal in European markets.

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  12. "It was the Icelanders that did 9-11, with a little help from some unemployed Basque separatists."

    I actually go to school with two Icelanders. Apparently they're looking to start a big arms buildup and go back to their Viking ways.

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  13. Two decades or so ago one of those feminist organizations blasted NATO for discimination, listing Iceland as one of the countries that refused to allow women to join their armed forces...not realizing Iceland has no official armed forces.

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  14. Apparently they're looking to start a big arms buildup and go back to their Viking ways.

    Cutler has it. They need the arms buildup, to stick some broads in a military, so under the EU rules they can sell that juice. Otherwise they're froze out.

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  15. THE JEREMIAH WRIGHT IMBROGLIO PROBABLY would have thrown even the most capable political movement for a loop. But the left's reaction to the still continuing crisis has drifted into high comedy.

    ...

    In my ongoing effort to help WEEKLY STANDARD readers better understand the modern left, I'll offer a few theories:

    1. THE FIGHTING NETROOTS! -- I bore witness when the Netroots became an influential political force. One of their distinguishing characteristics is to greet every challenge from the right as if it is of Biblical significance.

    ...

    2. THE KITCHEN SINK TENDENCY -- Over the last few years, the left has thrown everything it can think of at its political foes. Sometimes, their attacks are contradictory, but that seldom slows them down.


    Wrong Stuff

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  16. Interesting fact #2 for the night:

    "Great Britain had agreed, said Salazar, not to invoke the treaty of Windsor, which since 1386 had bound the two countries [G.B. and Portugul] to mutual assistance. The British had last used the treaty to draw Portugal into the First World War, at a cost of 7,222 Portuguese lives."

    Well, at least we don't have Alliance problems that bad.

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  17. Hong Kong itself has tightened visa rules, seeking to limit entry to foreigners who might be planning to stage protests when the torch returns to Chinese soil later this week.

    But perhaps nowhere is the new mood more palpable than in Tibet, a premier tourist destination that has been closed off to foreigners since March 14. As a result of the ban, most foreign journalists have been barred from covering the torch relay through Tibet, including plans for a photogenic climb up Mount Everest.

    Nine foreign newspapers and broadcasters have been allowed in to cover part of the relay, but only for 10 days in a carefully shepherded trip.


    Hospitable to Hostile

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  18. Doug,

    If that good authority is our friendly neighborhood cow reporting from her 400 sq ft marble gilded toilets, than I guess there's nothing for us to do but eat straw.

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