“This site is dedicated to preying on peoples vanity, ignorance, or loneliness, gaining their trust and betraying them without remorse.”

Saturday, April 26, 2008

Kardashian at party for Girls Gone Wild Magazine, endorses Obama.

"It wasn't just him and I. I was at an event,"said Kardashian.

"I had dinner with him (Obama) once, and he just seemed very firm about the change, and that's, like, his motto,"

Kim Kardashian Reveals Details Of Dinner With Barack Obama
By Brian Andrews Published 04/24/2008 Reality TV Star News
Barack Obama Hoping To Gain Democratic Nomination

Kim Kardashian has been seen in a sex tape which has made her the focus of many men. The one she is focusing on these days is presidential hopeful Barack Obama. The Senator apparently made an impression with her while having dinner together.

Kardashian revealed at a launch party for Girls Gone Wild Magazine, that she is endorsing Senator Obama for president. The move came at the party that was held in Los Angeles.

"I had dinner with him once, and he just seemed very firm about the change, and that's, like, his motto," she said. When asked about the dinner, she quickly pointed out that the two were not alone. "It wasn't just him and I. I was at an event,"said Kardashian.

She is not the only one in her family to be backing Obama in his quest to become the next president. Her stepbrother, Brody Jenner, also has come out in support of Obama.

Obama was hoping to lock up the Democratic nomination in Pennsylvania on this past Tuesday. That did not happen, however, as Hillary Clinton defeated Obama by almost ten points. The battle now heads on, in search of a winner who will eventually battle John McCain to be the next president.



Our Guy Retaliates.

42 comments:

  1. At least he hasn't bashed Nancy.
    ...yet.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Kim has a way of making politicians firm about change.

    ReplyDelete
  3. From the Washington Times-

    "The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. was supposed to be a problem for Democrats, but Sen. John McCain has now made it his own dilemma by clashing with Republicans who say Sen. Barack Obama's former pastor is fair game.

    The spat between the presumptive Republican presidential nominee and a state Republican Party branch has also called into question the senator's status as the de facto leader of his party.

    Mr. McCain has grown increasingly infuriated by the North Carolina Republican Party's decision to run a television ad next week in advance of the state's May 6 primary calling Mr. Obama "too extreme" because of his connection to Mr. Wright. The ad includes a clip of one of Mr. Wright's sermons in which he calls on God to condemn America.

    Yesterday, after his campaign spent two days trying to persuade the state party's chairman to cancel the ad, Mr. McCain's anger boiled over.

    "The Republican Party of the state of North Carolina is dead wrong," he said on CBS' "The Early Show." "I'll do everything in my power to make sure not only they stop it, but that kind of leadership is rejected."

    He railed about the decision again on NBC's "Today" program. "They're not listening to me because they're out of touch with reality and the Republican Party," he said. "This kind of campaigning is unacceptable. I have said that. It will harm the Republicans' cause."

    ReplyDelete
  4. "They're not listening to me because they're out of touch with reality and the Republican Party," he said. "This kind of campaigning is unacceptable. I have said that. It will harm the Republicans' cause."
    ---
    Yep, and WE are out of touch wrt illegals, so Fuck you Senator (cornyn?)
    "I know more about immigration than anyone!"
    ---
    Always Blame Conservatives, kiss up to the NY Times.

    ReplyDelete
  5. How can he not know by now how N Carolina's republicans feel?
    Ans.
    He's MAD.

    ReplyDelete
  6. He'll die with his temper still out of control.
    Guess I'm blessed I assumed the persona of a virile castratti some years ago.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Deuce;

    You just Might be the Best.

    ReplyDelete
  8. As of Friday, the state party’s Web site was soliciting contributions from true Aryans everywhere to “keep this ad on the air” because the idea of an uppity jigaboo in the WHITE house is “just too extreme for North Carolina”. McCain might be playing Good Cop Bad Cop here, but I'll give him the benefit of the doubt and my grudging respect.

    ReplyDelete
  9. So, conservative North Carolinians are racist NAZIs?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Whit: So, conservative North Carolinians are racist NAZIs?

    That's what McCainiac is telling us by his very public repudiation of the ad. He gets to appear sanctimonous by rejecting the tactics of the good old boys in NC, and he's using this as the opportunity to seize the reins of control of the national GOP. He knows Republicans in the Solid South have no where else to land but him.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Yeah, well he might find that a buncha good ol' boys like me went fishin on Nov 7.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm gonna tell ya sumpin. This election will be just like all the rest; it'll be decided in Central Fl (if the Panhandle turns out) and Southern Ohio.

    The Good Ol Boys don't turn out, there, and nothin else matters.

    And, Colo.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Tje good mews is the over sixties, like, who like, invented the word like, like back in the sixties, are, like the only ones to like to come out and vote, and like they vote r like robots.

    I may change my registration for the first time in my, like, life. Wife's place is at ground zero back there in swing country.

    ReplyDelete
  14. He'll die with his temper still out of control.

    He might. I read somewhere folks like that have higher blood pressure, and it gets em sometimes.

    ReplyDelete
  15. The witch that came with pail and rag
    Was once the beauty Abishag
    The picture pride of Hollywood.
    Provide, Provide.

    ReplyDelete
  16. See the girl with the red dress on
    She can do the dog all night long...

    ReplyDelete
  17. If McCain doesn't use a clone of that very ad in Nov. against Obama he's a G Damn Fool.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Rufus: I'm gonna tell ya sumpin. This election will be just like all the rest; it'll be decided in Central Fl (if the Panhandle turns out) and Southern Ohio.

    Granted Florida and Ohio and Colorado are crucial, but this year add Virginia and Missouri, which has voted for the winner of every Presidential election since 1904 except in 1956. As for my Obamacan state of Washington, we're so blue we've got Smurfette for governor.

    ReplyDelete
  19. "Out of touch with reality and the republican party."

    That's rich.

    Hope nobody starts picking on Bill Ayers, either. Might just send McCain over the deep end.

    ReplyDelete
  20. You're right, T. I, almost, included Mo. in that comment. I don't know about Obama; but, I'm pretty sure Hillary could carry it. As for Va. I'm even more clueless than normal.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Clinton is ahead in the popular vote because Obama wasn't even on the ballot in Michigan. Because he followed the rules.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Rules?

    Who said anything about rules?

    He coulda broke the rules, too!

    But he was on the ballot in Texas, lost the popular vote, but came up with more delegates, cause old folk couldn't wheelchair it to the caucii.

    ReplyDelete
  23. "cause old folk couldn't wheelchair it to the caucii."

    Mobilist, and I resent it.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I remember taking my aunt at age 96 or so to her last vote. Parked in the handycap spot with no permit, immediately got quizzed by a cop, let off, made it to the polls. If she'd have had to attend a caucus too, later in the day, well, no way.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Whit, just looked in the closet...where did you get that beauty?

    ReplyDelete
  26. Both parties count on victory in dozens of states that long have voted their way. The competition to reach the 270 electoral votes needed to win is expected to play out primarily in 14 states. All but one saw the greatest action in 2004. The exception is Virginia, a longtime Republican stronghold where Democrats have made inroads.

    Eight of the states went for President Bush four years ago, including the crown jewels Ohio and Florida. Six, including big-prize Pennsylvania, voted for Democrat John Kerry. In the battlegrounds, far more electoral votes, 97, are up for grabs for Democrats than the 69 available for McCain to go after. Twice as many of the closest states _ decided by 2 or fewer percentage points _ voted Republican in 2004; they include New Mexico and Iowa, which the GOP won by 1 point.

    Both sides argue that their candidates can expand the playing field by making more states competitive than in previous elections. But they likely will only spend time and money to test that theory once they feel confident about higher priority states.
    ...
    Of the 14 battlegrounds, Bush won eight with 97 electoral votes. Half of those states were decided by only 1 or 2 percentage points, and all were under 10 points. Five have Democratic governors this year. Electoral votes are in parentheses.

    Three Western states _ Colorado (9), Nevada (5) and New Mexico (5) _ appear obvious targets for Democrats given their gains in the region, sharp population growth and large numbers of swing-voting Hispanics. But McCain, a four-term senator from Arizona, does well among those voters, too; his Senate support for an eventual path to citizenship for illegal immigrants could help.

    To the east, Iowa (7) holds promise for the Democrats; Republicans narrowly put it into their column in 2004 after years of Democratic dominance. Both Obama and Clinton competed here during the primary. McCain's opposition to ethanol subsidies complicate his chances, nor is he a favorite of evangelicals. Though less likely to change hands, Missouri (11) is a perennial battleground.

    McCain also must defend the two vote-rich prizes that decided the past two elections.

    Ohio (20), a bellwether that tipped the race to Bush in 2004, may be poised for a switch, with a rash of job losses, high numbers of Iraq casualties and a series of Republican statewide political defeats in 2006, including the governor.

    Florida (27), which put Bush in the White House in 2000 and voted for him again in 2004, will certainly be hard-fought, given its electoral treasure chest. Its demographics are tilting more Republican, though, and Obama has fared poorly in the primaries among Jewish and Hispanic voters. Clinton may have a better shot.

    Virginia (13) is a case where Obama, who is black, might play stronger than Clinton because of the state's large black population. The state moves into the competitive category given Democratic gains fueled by the growing Washington suburbs. Virginia also is home to large communities of military veterans who may have an affinity for McCain, a former Navy pilot who spent more than five years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Virginia also is home to large communities of military veterans who may have an affinity for McCain, a former Navy pilot who spent more than five years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam.

    Vets have no affinity for John McSame. He opposes the new GI Bill and has voted against improving care at veterans' hospitals and providing mental health services to soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder. In 2006, McCain voted against the Kerry amendment that would have eliminated increased fees and co-payments for veterans in the TRICARE health care program by raising the discretionary spending limit by approximately $10 billion.

    ReplyDelete
  28. "I remember taking my aunt at age 96 or so to her last vote. Parked in the handycap spot with no permit, immediately got quizzed by a cop, let off, made it to the polls. If she'd have had to attend a caucus too, later in the day, well, no way."

    File it under the "tiny things that can have huge effects" category.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Sat Apr 26, 08:27:00 PM EDT

    And what are his reasons for doing so?

    I'm going to go out on a limb and presume it isn't simply out of spite.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Watch for the "obama aint my homeboy" t-shirts. And of course the wearers will be labeled bitter "racists".

    ReplyDelete
  31. "The use of mushrooms can produce hallucinogenic effects which can lead to extreme or life-threatening behaviour," the health ministry said in a statement late on Friday after the cabinet decision.


    Figures from the Amsterdam emergency services show there were 55 call-outs for mushroom-related incidents in 2004, a figure which had more than doubled by 2006 to 128, with the majority of youngsters involved coming from Britain.


    The Dutch to ban the Magic Mushroom

    They've done something right. Around here, we've had a story, really too long to relate, but fellow A has a child with gal A, gets divorced, fellow B marries, or moves in with gal A, fellow A finds out fellow B is having an affair with gal B, some sort of diclosure threat is made, or assumed, and gal A testifies 'both Leonard and Lee(fellows A and B) had taken the psychoactive drug mescaling a few days before the shooting." Lee plugged Leonard three times.

    You get the picture.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I would like a polling of the elite EB Club:
    ---
    Teresita said...
    George: "Today, in the name of public safety, the British government has practically eliminated the citizens’right to self-defense."

    Gosh, that means Britain is no longer a Democracy and they can't join our proposed parallel UN of nothing but democracies. This explains why Scotland is talking about breaking out of the United Kingdom.

    Okay, sarcasm mode off. My point is that Britain is not actually ruled by the Queen, but is self-governing. Even the House of Lords has been emasculated. So any gun-control laws they are resorting to in England are the will of the people. Vox Populi.
    ---
    Is this entity really as STUPID as she appears to be, is it just another of her false flags to create chaos and grab attention for herself, or BOTH?

    ReplyDelete
  33. Just had to turn off the White House Correspondent's dinner on c-span. Pure embarrassing torture.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Deuce:
    Do you mean the pledge?

    ReplyDelete
  35. westhaek has two threads, one on General P and the other, the Battle of Basra,

    Seems to me, that westhawk sees the PR win that Maliki and his Government get in the legitimacy campaign.

    A major success, he sees, wuth General P's appointment as a foreshadowing of the end of the campaign.

    ReplyDelete
  36. rat, that's kinda the way i've been seeing it too. but, i've already done more than my share of wishful thinking.

    btw: I see that the marines are back in helmand province to shore up the brits. that sounds like more good news to me.

    ReplyDelete
  37. US Marines deploying in Afghanistan for first time in years
    By JASON STRAZIUSO – 1 hour ago

    HELMAND PROVINCE, Afghanistan (AP) — U.S. Marines are crossing the sands of southern Afghanistan for the first time in years, providing a boost to a NATO coalition that is growing but still short on manpower.

    They hope to retake the 10 percent of Afghanistan the Taliban holds.

    Some of the Marines that make up the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit helped to tame a thriving insurgency in western Iraq. Some 3,500 newly arrived troops hope to move into regions of Afghanistan now controlled by the Taliban.

    The Marines are working alongside British forces in Helmand province — the world's largest opium-poppy region and site of the fiercest Taliban resistance over the last two years. The director of U.S. intelligence has said the Taliban controls 10 percent of Afghanistan — much of that in Helmand.

    "Our mission is to come here and essentially set the conditions, make Afghanistan a better place, provide some security, allow for the expansion of governance in those same areas," said Col. Peter Petronzio, the unit's commander.

    Thirteen of the 19 Marines in the platoon of 1st Lt. Adam Lynch, 27, served in 2006 and 2007 in Ramadi, the capital of the Anbar province in western Iraq. The vast region was once al-Qaida in Iraq's stronghold before the militants were pushed out in early 2007.

    ReplyDelete
  38. The Battle of Basra gave Petraeus something to point to in the Senate hearing room when they asked him whether the Surge was producing political results and not just military ones. The battle has many apparent benefits, but whether they are tangible is yet to be seen.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hello! Your blog is rather interesting. I have nothing positive to say about Girls Gone Wild. I have always been against such types of sites. But when I saw it on www.pisedconsumer.com I was astonished. The thing is that it has so many customers! Unbeliveble! And even they are dissatisfied taking into consideration the amount of negative reports posted by the customers.

    ReplyDelete