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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Oil, Israel and Saudi Arabia, The Manny, Moe and Jack of US Policy in The Middle East

Let’s drop back a year:




Serious disagreements remain in U.S.-led coalition battling the Islamic State

 October 14 at 6:31 PM   




Two months after the start of its campaign against the Islamic State, the U.S.-led coalition conducting operations in Iraq and Syria has expanded significantly but remains beset by lingering strategic differences that threaten to undermine the fight.
The Obama administration has emphasized the breadth of the coalition it has assembled to combat the militant group, including the participation of five Arab countries that have played a supporting role in the campaign of airstrikes in Syria. But serious disagreements remain, particularly over the coalition’s plan for Syria and whether the fight against Islamic State militants there will strengthen or weaken Syrian ruler Bashar al-Assad in the long run.
Military chiefs from the United States and 21 other countries convened Tuesday for an unusual session at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland to discuss the campaign. The day-long event, hosted by Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, included an appearance by President Obama — part of an effort by his administration to dispel doubts about Washington’s long-term commitment to the region.
In his remarks to a room filled with military brass from around the world, Obama cited some preliminary “important successes” against the Islamic State but warned that “this is going to be a long-term campaign” with “periods of progress and setbacks.”
Sixty countries are now participating to some degree in the U.S.-led coalition against Islamic State forces in Iraq and Syria, according to the Obama administration. A number of administration officials have used the Bush-era term “coalition of the willing” while emphasizing that members may differ widely on what they are willing to contribute.
The question is whether such a diverse coalition, whose members have differing objectives, can be herded into agreement on a coherent strategy.
Turkey, which joined in the talks Tuesday but unlike most countries did not send its highest-ranking general, has so far balked at joining in the fight in Syria or allowing the U.S. military to use its nearby bases for airstrikes.
France and Turkey, in turn, have pushed to establish a no-fly and buffer zone to protect refugees in northern Syria, an idea opposed by the United States, Germany and others. No country in the coalition is eager to send ground troops to Iraq or Syria, despite a shortage of reliable proxy forces in either country to fight the Islamic State head-to-head.
Shadi Hamid, a Middle East scholar with the Brookings Institution in Washington, called Tuesday’s military summit “a positive step” in terms of coordinating tactical operations against the Islamic State. But he said it was unlikely to resolve deeper divisions, especially regarding desired outcomes for Syria’s long-running civil war.
“The coalition partners have very different conceptions about the regional order and don’t even agree on what the primary threat is,” he said. “You have all these different actors who want different things and in some cases also strongly dislike each other.”
Richard Fontaine, president of the Center for a New American Security, a think tank in Washington, said the Obama administration has successfully built the coalition based on the singular goal of defeating the Islamic State. But he said unity is likely to fray once other questions arise, such as whether to extend the fight to the Syrian government or other jihadist groups in the region.
Combating the Islamic State is “the unifying mission that all these coalition partners agree on,” he said. “Where it gets tricky is when you have to make other decisions.”
There have been mixed results on the battlefield since the U.S. military began airstrikes in Iraq on Aug. 8 and extended its air campaign to Syria on Sept. 22, with the Islamic State losing control of territory in some places while making gains in others.
In Iraq, U.S. warplanes and Kurdish troops on the ground have pushed back Islamic State fighters from the Sinjar mountain range, from the Mosul Dam — which controls much of the country’s water supplies — and away from the northern cities of Irbil, Kirkuk and Amerli.
But Islamic State forces have surged across Anbar province in western Iraq and over the weekend closed within several miles of the strategically vital Baghdad international airport, where hundreds of U.S. troops are stationed.
Army Col. Steve Warren, a Pentagon spokesman, said it was too soon to assess the effectiveness of the air campaign and the broader strategy, which U.S. officials have said will probably take years to unfold. “It’s simply too premature,” he said.
“It is a tough fight in Anbar, there’s no question about it,” Warren added. “There will be ebbs and flows across the battlefield for months.”
In Syria, the U.S. military and allied warplanes from Saudi Arabia, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates at first concentrated their airstrikes on Islamic State supply lines, small oil refineries and command centers.
In recent days, however, the coalition has been forced to shift its air operations to Kobane near the Turkish border, where Islamic State fighters have encircled the predominantly Kurdish city and threatened to massacre civilians. Since playing down the strategic importance of Kobane last week amid criticism that it was slow to intervene, the Pentagon and Arab countries have escalated their attacks there, including a blitz of 21 airstrikes on Monday and Tuesday.
The battle for Kobane illustrates one of the numerous fault lines running through the coalition. Syrian Kurds defending the town against the Islamic State are allied with the Kurdish Workers Party, or PKK, an enemy of Turkey. The Turks have refused to allow aid and fighters to cross the border to assist the Kobane defenders, believing it would strengthen the PKK.
While U.S. officials have gingerly noted that the survival of Kobane is not a strategic goal of the coalition, the administration has faced international warnings of a genocide if the Islamic State is allowed to overrun the town.
On Tuesday, French President François Hollande called it “a martyred town, a symbolic town” and said that “all countries concerned” should be providing weapons to Kobane defenders. “Turkey must absolutely open its border,” Hollande said.

Craig Whitlock covers the Pentagon and national security. He has reported for The Washington Post since 1998.

161 comments:

  1. The true colors of US 'allies are being shown.
    The false flags don't really fly in the face of a hurricane.

    The Saudi-Israeli-Egyptian-Turkish Alliance is hanging tough, while giving lip service to the Coalition.
    The US s still trying to straddle the fence ...

    Having demonized the Daesh, it now finds itself between a rock and a hard place.
    The 'old' US allies, mentioned above, are not into 'fighting the fight'.
    The Saudi and its Arab proxies know that without communication and coordination between the air and ground forces, bombing will be inconsequential, tactically as well as strategically, against the Daesh. So they happily participate in the Kabuki theater stage play.

    The Zionists of Israel, providing succor and safe passage to the Daesh, on their way to Kobane.
    The Zionists in Washington DC, do not want to annoy their old allies and proxies, but the pressure is mounting, the Daesh being the "New: NAZIs, cannot be shrugged off.
    Kobane has become 'strategic' in the public's perception.
    The people of the US not buying into its lack of importance.

    Not buying into the 'Decades Long Struggle' that lays ahead.
    The public wants a win, and wants it now.

    All that it would take, a little support for Assad and his Kurdish allies.
    A little coordination and communication.

    But ... Israel and Saudi Arabia, they prefer al-Qeada.
    Israel prefers Daesh (al-Qeada) in Syria, over the Alawites, Christians and their Kurdish allies

    Israel’s Ambassador to the United States Michael Oren told the Jerusalem Post that Israel so wanted Assad out and his Iranian backers weakened, that Israel would accept al-Qaeda operatives taking power in Syria.

    “We always wanted Bashar Assad to go, we always preferred the bad guys who weren’t backed by Iran to the bad guys who were backed by Iran.”

    Even if the other “bad guys” were affiliated with al-Qaeda.
    “We understand that they are pretty bad guys,” Oren said in the interview.

    http://www.jpost.com/Syria-Crisis/Oren-Jerusalem-has-wanted-Assad-ousted-since-the-outbreak-of-the-Syrian-civil-war-326328

    In broad daylight, a Saudi-Israeli alliance
    ---------------------------------

    Saudi Israeli alliance forged in blood
    ---------------------------------

    Understanding the Israeli-Egyptian-Saudi alliance

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cutting and pasting is not standard essay form, no matter the length of the attachments. Try expressing your own thoughts in writing. Anyone, well almost, can write a 300 word essay. Give it a go. And good luck. We here are all for you.

      Delete
  2. The US needs no special relationships within the Middle East. It needs no permanent allies or permanent enemies. It does not need Saudi Arabia, Iran, Turkey or Israel.

    If ISIS is a threat to the US, then it needs to be destroyed by the US and anyone else who wants to fight and can do so. The US should fight them where they are and then leave.

    There is not one country in the Middle East that warrants support by the US for its own sake. Saudi Arabia, Israel and oil interests are not worth US involvement. Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Iran and Israel have nothing to offer the long term interest of the US.

    US interests belong in the Americas. That has always been true. It continues to be true and it is well past time to do something about it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. To reduce the complexities of USA interactions in the mid east to:

    Oil, Israel and Saudi Arabia

    is simplistic in the extreme, and disingenuous and not worth the bother talking about on only those terms.

    So, I go back to reading American Thinker, and writing to my OGL about that truly weird movie we just watched.

    While I can't really recommend anyone go to see it, it was a wild ride......

    That couple's kid is going to be really screwed up........

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sometime, in your own words, you can enlighten us on the contributions made to the US by that worthy threesome and expand on the cost to us. I realize that it is too complex for most of us, and we probably will not get it on the first try but we do await your more incisive view on their indispensable nature to US interests, as you see it, in Idaho, of course.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As you say, it is simply to complex for you, so why waste my time?

      And you wouldn't like it, as there would be so little Jew bashing in it.

      g'nite

      Cheers!

      Delete
  5. What does any of this -

    http://hotair.com/archives/2014/10/14/kurds-isis-held-territory-discoveries/

    have to do with oil, Israel or Saudi Arabia?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ... nothing, but that is part of the fun ...

      Delete
  6. Here is a simple start:

    Which of the three has been the most disastrous, which slightly less disastrous and finally, just disastrous?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Try not to act like a singular coyote attacking an elk.

    ReplyDelete
  8. http://news.yahoo.com/state-backed-iraq-shiite-militias-commit-war-crimes-004909801.html
    State-backed Iraq Shiite militias commit 'war crimes': Amnesty

    "Shiite militias backed by the Iraqi army ** are committing war crimes against civilians in their fightback against the Islamic State jihadist group, rights watchdog Amnesty International said Tuesday."

    Iraqi army should always be followed by (sic), i.e. Iraqi Army (sic).

    ReplyDelete
  9. How much did we spend to get rid of the evil Saddam and create a democratic Iraq that would not threaten its neighbors?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Name the countries threatened by Saddam. Iran comes to mind and I don’t recall that we mobilized to stop Iraq from killing Iranians.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I guess that implies that we were not dogmatically opposed to murder on a large scale.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Embarrassingly enough, a major attack on New York City and Washington DC, by our Saudi friends did not warrant a US mass killing of Saudis. It did not rise to be worth one single shot to be fired at Saudi Arabia.

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  13. Then there is always the needy but faithful client Israel that is always ready to provide secret, non visible, effervescent, existential assistance, deep behind the scenes, rarely visible, undetectable and priceless support to US interests in the Middle East and for that matter, the entire galactic cluster. The trouble is, it is not priceless. It comes with a very substantial political and economic cost. I know that it is impolite to mention, but there it is.

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    1. Israel has a right to exist, America has recognized that right and supports it.

      The enemies of Israel are the enemies of America.

      Regardless of your feelings that is a fact.

      The current clusterfuck in the middle east between ISIS and the Iranian proxies? has nothing to do with Israel other than both sides, both the sunnis and the shiites wish the jews dead.

      We Jews are so sorry we did not fight the nazis and stopped the SS and the German army, we are so sorry we are pussies and use fighter planes and other means to strike those that seek our genocide.

      There is a cost to the USA for supporting Israel.

      But the truth? If Israel were destroyed tomorrow and every Jew in the world had their throats slit?

      The Islamic assholes would STILL hate America and the west.

      Nothing would change.

      Now you may not like the analogy, but Israel is the tip of the spear in fighting jihadists.

      Laugh, ridicule and mock all you wish but it the truth, the Jews have been fighting Jihadists for centuries.

      AND truth be told, so has America. since 1783 America has been fighting the Islamic fucktards.

      From the halls of montezuma to the shores of tripoli..

      The barbary pirates were in fact Jihadist islamic fucktards.

      nothing has changed.

      those that worship the moon god are insane.

      Delete
    2. ...The tip of the spear :) Thanks for the comic relief, but speaking of gods on your turf, here is another one:

      A massive cult complex, dating back about 3,300 years, has been discovered at the site of Tel Burna in Israel.

      While archaeologists have not fully excavated the cult complex, they can tell it was quite large, as the courtyard alone was 52 by 52 feet (16 by 16 meters). Inside the complex, researchers discovered three connected cups, fragments of facemasks, massive jars that are almost as big as a person and burnt animal bones that may indicate sacrificial rituals.

      The archaeologists said they aren't sure who was worshipped at the complex, though Baal, the Canaanite storm god, is a possibility. "The letters of Ugarit [an ancient site in modern-day Syria] suggest that of the Canaanite pantheon, Baal, the Canaanite storm god, would have been the most likely candidate," Itzhaq Shai, a professor at Ariel University who is directing a research project at Tel Burna, told Live Science in an email.

      Delete
    3. US support for Israel has nothing at all to do with Israel's supposed "Right to Exist".

      Israel has no more "Right to Exist" than does the Great Barrier Reef, or the wolves of Idaho.
      The people have a right to life, their government, as presently constituted has no "Right to Exist".

      Delete
    4. The tip of the spear, Jesus that is a good one.

      Delete
    5. Onward Jewish soldiers, marching as to war. With The Staa - aar of David
      Go - ing on be- fore: Bibi the Loy - al Master Leeds a - gainst the foe:
      For - ward in - to battle Leads against the A-Rabsss - Tip o Spear on High!

      Delete
    6. Like I said, mock, ridicule and make fun of what you don't understand or know.

      Meanwhile, Israel does much to keep your unappreciative tushie safe.

      I don't expect you to say thanks, I don't expect shit from you.

      But i did expect you to be the pompous prick you are...

      Delete
    7. I’ll pray for redemption and wait to hear the good news of the deeds done for my safety and security, G-d and country, discreetly in silence, by the always stealthy and unappreciated ally in the East.

      Delete
    8. There are plenty of examples of good deeds, but there are none so blind as to those who refuse to see.

      I suggest you visit Israel, take a 1st hand look at the place then comment.

      Delete
    9. .

      Do you guys work off of talking point memos or do you all just read the same articles out of the JP? It's like they slip today's memo under your door each morning.

      Visit Israel. Do you know how many times I have seen that same suggestion from you guys, from Israeli politicians, from various Jewish groups, etc.

      During the Gaza conflict, Netanyahu would say something one day and the next day you would see the same admonition on the lips of every media pundit and politician, even our own.

      .

      Delete
    10. No Quirk, it's the secret weapon, many who hate israel, who are ignorant of the reality are transformed by a visit there.

      It's simple.

      Reality of what is Israel is powerful.

      Delete
    11. It's like no other place on the planet.

      Christians, Jews and yes Moslems become huge fans of Israel after visiting it...

      Delete
    12. .

      Yes, it is a secret weapon. Doesn't every US Senator and Representative have to take the mandatory trip there? AIPAC can't pay for it but their charity can and since it is a charity the cost is tax free. Heck, I should go. I'm paying enough for their trips.

      I've heard some of them describe the trip. I bet they are fans.

      .

      Delete
    13. aipac is not tax deductible.

      you should learn more before commenting.

      Delete
    14. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  14. http://rhinoden.rangerup.com/hero-without-a-gun/

    ReplyDelete
  15. I had one strategic interest in toppling Saddam and it had nothing to do with Israel. I believed then and I believe now that the Strait of Hormuz is the most important piece of real estate in the world. To insure that the U.S. controls the strait and its flow of oil, I did and do support a strong U.S. garrison in Iraq and a strong showing by the U.S. Navy.

    By controlling the Strait, the U.S. can either help or strangle China, the E.U., Saudi Arabia, Iran, et al. In years to come that is going to be essential to future U.S. victories. Despite its flaws, the U.S. remains the strongest bastion of freedom and democracy in the world. Remove the U.S. and our children over countless generations will live in a Dark Age.

    Because one coach or a group of coaches fail their responsibilities does not detract from the quality of the players. The mission and the strategy are no less important because the American electorate hasn't the good sense to know three Justices of the Supreme Court or their own Congressional delegation or cannot distinguish a man of integrity from a charlatan.

    Neutrality and isolation are impossibilities and have been since the invention of transoceanic sailing ships. Given the time necessary and the vast distances sailed, the East Indies, India, China, and Japan should have been able to live in safety. How did that work out? It is a dangerous world.

    Had it been my call, by 9/12/2001 there would have been several thousand fewer Saudis; Pakistan's nuclear weapons would have been in American hands or Pakistan would have been a geographic place name; and a number of other violent actions would have been undertaken to send a clear message: fuck with us and you die. Instead, we got a pussy who encouraged Americans to shop and to remember that Islam was the religion of peace.

    ... end of rant ...

    ReplyDelete
  16. .

    What is it that old saw about insanity - doing the same thing over and over again hoping for a different result this time?

    Well that sums up all of you, even quirk who wants more now that we are in.


    And what would you do, Ash?

    ...you are all singing from the same page hoping that, somehow, this time will be different. It won't.

    There are some here that know it won't be any different. We went into this thing with no planning, with no intel either in Syria or Iraq, with no allies, with nothing but a general plan to bomb the shit out of IS, with our chief goal to assure not one American was killed, with a strategy that the military said was insufficient, with no definite time frame, expecting to form a coalition of the willing all of which would agree to the same goals and priorities that we have, this amongst 60 'allies' in a region where everyone is a dick and has his own priorities, and with the expectation that someone there would there gladly jump up and say, "Send me in coach, I want to provide the boots on the ground".

    We have seen the same incompetence here we have seen in the past; but, what would you suggest we do, Ash? You have POTUS telling the world that we are going to war with IS. We have been bombing them for 2 months. We have 60 nations that have signed on to 'do something'. We forced Malaki out of office. IS has put up videos showing Americans being beheaded and stating it was because of the American bombing. What would you suggest the US do, pick up and leave?

    Obama has committed the US to this farce. Kerry has been trying to do the impossible, herding cats; politicking, cajoling, bullshitting. Susan Rice as usual has contributed in her own inimitable way. Every day Kerry has to make up another story, tell another lie, provide more bullshit. Hell, he's starting to sound like the rat. The US is still the Primo Superpower in the world. When we talk about NATO, we are talking about the US. When we talk about a coalition, we are talking about the US. When this is over the Brits will brag about their 6 planes and the difference it made. Kerry will agree and thank them. The Aussies will smile as Kerry tells them the same thing. But if there is anything positive that comes out of this FUBAR it will be the US that does. it. And now we have no choice. Obama has publicly put the world on notice that this is a fight to the finish or at least that ISIL will be 'degraded and destroyed' whatever meaning they decide for that in the end.

    I'm not hoping this time it will be different though I would love to see that. What I am hoping is that we get through it without looking like incompetents or paper tigers.

    Lately, I have been hoping for a serious increase in our bombing efforts; that if we don't have enough US planes or support personnel, we bring in more; that somehow we get the intel we need; that when the Iraqi's are actually fighting as they were around that military base near Hit, we provide them with the air support they request; that we don't spend another decade in that shit hole that is the ME.

    My fear is if we go too long without seriously bloodying IS, the pressure will build to bring in US troops.

    .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good post, however, US troops are inevitable. We may as well get it over with, beat the piss out of them and for once be smart and leave.

      Delete
    2. So what happens after America puts troops on the ground and kicks ISIS's ass? We sit back and watch the Iranians and their proxies continue to slaughter another 300,000?

      We are not going to fight ALL the bad guys...

      Arm the Kurds and let the shiites and the sunnis slug it out.

      Delete
    3. .

      Leave the whole ME to stew in its own venom.

      I agree with Deuce, there is nothing the US needs there.

      .

      Delete
    4. Except the fuel needed to power all that "Detroit Steel".
      You know, the 300 illion vehicles that are in the US.

      The Middle East still provides about 22% of that.

      Because the US never has 'pushed' for alternate fuel sources.
      Never utilized the great agricultural base of the Americas, to grow our own energy.

      Delete
    5. You know, the 300 million vehicles that are in the US

      Delete
    6. I have answered your question already Quirk - the USA should stand down in the ME. Doubling down on a bad bet is not a viable strategy for victory.

      Delete
  17. .

    Rufus, seems to agree that US/Coalition air power, supporting local forces will secure the ground that the US considers important.

    Way to go, rat. With a statement that broad you can't go wrong whether at the end of this little tussle the US eventually takes out Assad in Syria or whether they just barely manage to hold onto the Green Zone.

    .

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    1. Exactly correct, Legionnaire.
      The "Goal" is amorphous, as are "US Interests".

      'Destroy and Degrade' an organization that is amorphous.
      An organization that changes its name as often as Robert "Draft Dodger" Peterson changes his underwear.

      Words that don't mean a thing.
      But have you jumping up and down.

      The Administration wants to have the "Thirty Years War", it will benefit Mr Obama's benefactor at General Dynamics.

      Delete
  18. Deuce: A massive cult complex, dating back about 3,300 years, has been discovered at the site of Tel Burna in Israel.

    While archaeologists have not fully excavated the cult complex, they can tell it was quite large, as the courtyard alone was 52 by 52 feet (16 by 16 meters). Inside the complex, researchers discovered three connected cups, fragments of facemasks, massive jars that are almost as big as a person and burnt animal bones that may indicate sacrificial rituals.

    The archaeologists said they aren't sure who was worshipped at the complex, though Baal, the Canaanite storm god, is a possibility. "The letters of Ugarit [an ancient site in modern-day Syria] suggest that of the Canaanite pantheon, Baal, the Canaanite storm god, would have been the most likely candidate," Itzhaq Shai, a professor at Ariel University who is directing a research project at Tel Burna, told Live Science in an email.

    History is amazing.

    Go to Jerusalem and look at the retaining wall they call the "western wall"

    go take a tour of the wall, look at the most recent occupying moslem skills at rock hewing. they sucked....

    Then go to the bottom of the wall and see what the Jews built thousands of years ago....

    Sorry history tells a story, if you care to open your eyes and observe it.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Jews of a thousand years ago, whom have no connection to the Jews of today.

      Delete
    2. The Invention of the Jewish People
      is a book written by Shlomo Sand, an Israeli professor of history at the University of Tel Aviv.

      The author wasn’t probing a belief system but Zionist fabrications of a spurious common lineage for people of the Jewish faith.

      Sand argues that the idea of Jews having a common ethnic identity is implausible because, as with Christianity and Islam, Judaism was originally a “proselytising religion”.

      The notion of Judaism as a “race”, rather than a religion of various races, is without foundation.

      The recent study by John Hopkins geneticist Dr Elhaik confirms...
      that the common genome structure of the European Jew gravitated towards an origin in old Khazaria.

      “The majority of Jews do not have Middle Eastern genetic component,” he told Israeli newspaper Haaretz.

      Founded on a mélange of myths and manufactured historical tales,
      Israel has failed the archaeological test of time and is now exposed by DNA science.

      Today’s genetics prove unequivocally that in 1948 “the children of the original Jews” were replaced by converts ...
      With no roots in the Middle East.

      http://www.redressonline.com/2013/02/the-myth-of-the-jewish-people/


      Delete
    3. Once again you prove yourself to be a "nazi" in thought and deed.

      Thanks for saying what you say, you prove yourself to be the scum we all think you are.

      Delete
  19. Hong Kong authorities said police allegedly involved in the beating of a pro-democracy protester would be removed from their positions after footage of the overnight incident went viral, sparking outrage from some lawmakers and the public.

    ...

    On Tuesday, police used chainsaws and sledge-hammers to clear blockades on another major road in Admiralty.

    ...

    The number of protesters has fallen off sharply from a peak of about 100,000, but a hardcore group of perhaps several thousand remain.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sam, they just put up a video that captures the whole thing in high definition.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2YhfiXH4FCo

      Delete
  20. .

    It appears the GOP didn't have a chance in the Senate race in Michigan even against a weak sister like Peters.

    Local observers note that Peters isn’t exactly Mr. Charisma, but Land’s missteps have given him an easy time. “If you asked both of these candidates what time it was, Peters would give you a half-hour lecture on watchmaking,” said Jack Lessenberry, a political analyst for Michigan Radio. “Terri Lynn Land would stare at the wall for a while and then tentatively say, ‘Daytime?’”

    http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/10/did-republicans-blow-the-michigan-senate-race/381399/?single_page=true

    .

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  21. What has Israel done for the U.S. you ask.

    The newest and best treatments for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s are Israeli. They are being used by all major medical centers.

    Those good deals you get on generic medication through VA, Medicare, Walmart, and hundreds of medical plans are coming to you via Teva, the largest generic drug maker in the world. Following close is the Israeli company Abic. So when you go to Walgreens and buy a medication with the Walgreens’ label, it’s almost certainly of Israeli provenance.

    When a health care provider offers a nose drop that provides five-year protection against flu, don’t allow it; it’s Israeli. Any procedure using any form of “pill cam” must be rejected.

    Your computer has to be taken out to the street for the garbage collectors. Nearly every component in it had its origin in Israel. Pentium, Microsoft, Intel, and Cisco product all have to be trashed. While you are at it, pitch the cell-phone, an Israeli invention and still filled with Israeli technological innovations. Not to despair, the USPS is not polluted – oh, wait, yeah the barcodes are Israeli. Talking about barcodes and scanning, there can be no more shopping at Costco and about 35,000 other retailers who rely on Israeli technology for check out and inventory control. Hey, there are probably still some mom and pop stores out there that have manual registers.

    Sorry, Motorola and voice mail are history. Yeap, Israeli …

    Any produce or agricultural products benefiting from Israeli irrigation technologies are history to you.

    Israel leads the world in stem-cell research, so exercise caution if you need the repair of any of your organ systems utilizing stem-cell inputs.

    Israel owns nano-technology and has the only technology for the non-surgical removal of breast tissue masses and tumors. For invasive surgery, Israel has developed a cold plasma system for sterilizing and closing wounds without the need for stitches, staples, or glue. Healthy guys like you will never want this contaminated, Zionist claptrap. None of you will ever have to degrade yourselves with the new bio-retinas.
    Israel’s “Rewalk” exoskeleton system makes possible mobility of paraplegics; but none of you guys will ever need that.

    This list doesn’t even scratch the surface of Israel’s contributions to the U.S. Why, in the area of military technology alone a book could be written. The U.S. would be years behind its current high-tech state without Israeli inventions and innovations. Next time you hear of a drone, think of Israel. Oh, but to be pure, the drones must go! Oh, my.

    Since Israel is second only to the U.S. in start-up companies, the taxpayers of the U.S. are not paying the freight.

    So, you morally superior haters of all things Zionist, Jewish, Israel, start getting all these Israeli blessings out of your lives and welcome to the Stone Age. But I know you guys will make the sacrifices to make the point: down with Israel and up with BDS. I am going to miss you.

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    Replies
    1. What are you talking about? That is the best you can do? How about the Marx brothers who contributed so much to supporting humor in the US? No one has said anything about commercial enterprises or medicine. They are not charitable contributions or political commitments related to US security. Most are products or services. They are accomplishments of entrepreneurs, scientist, doctors who wanted to make money. Tell us about the secret behind the scenes thing that Israel does for US security that costs us $3 billion per year.

      You just made a compelling case about the dynamic Israeli economy that is totally capable of supporting its own political machinations and military spending. Buck up, take pride in your country and put down the tin cup.

      Delete
    2. Deuce, sometimes you sound like rat.

      Think of it this way......Israel is our front line.

      Or think of a canary in a coal mine.

      Or think of a base right in the middle of enemy territory.

      The arab world is pledged to kill us too, you know.

      Surely you have read your Koran by now.

      What does it say?

      It says subjugate people JUST LIKE YOU.

      And you sit there and cough up quotes from........Pontius Pilate !

      Well Jesus Christ !

      Further, Israel is the higher civilization in the area. We have a human duty to support the higher culture.

      And, I have already told you why.

      Read your William James.

      There, you will be told we should support those cultures and peoples according to their "fruits for life".

      This is a human duty.

      You have to start somewhere in judging these things and I challenge you to do better than William James.

      If you think Hamas, ISIS, Iran, etc create more 'fruits for life" than Israel then I say you have lost your mind.

      I have no idea where you get your animosity for Israel but you show it nearly every day.

      Delete
    3. Israel is NOT 'our" front line.

      They are not part of US.
      Never have been, never will be.

      They murder US sailors.

      Delete
    4. Your opinion is like an asshole, everyone has one and most stink...

      As one who is a Jew hating, Zionist bashing, Israel trashing, sub-human anti-semite? Really don't give a hoot about your "opinion" of Israel.

      But thanks for sharing, IF i could wipe your posts, like I wipe my ass? I would.

      Delete
    5. Deuce: Tell us about the secret behind the scenes thing that Israel does for US security that costs us $3 billion per year.

      Well of course that 3 billion goes for mostly American made overpriced trailers and munitions, and of course it's appreciated. but this of it, if America did not give BILLIONS and BILLIONS directly and indirectly in cash, arms or protection to the arabs the that aid would not be needed.

      But America is in the arms business, and the idea is and was, sell billions to the arabs and keep Israel one step ahead...

      quantitative edge you know...

      so Israel had already ended economic aid from the USA, the 1st recipient of USA aid ever to ask for it to be ended, and many call for an end of the military aid, but that's suicide since America FUNDS Hamas, the Saudis, the Palestinians, Jordanians, Egyptians, Qatar and others...

      Delete
    6. Deuce ☂Wed Oct 15, 02:00:00 AM EDT
      What are you talking about? That is the best you can do?

      No. I just have little tolerance for fools.

      Delete
  22. lost at the end of the last thread ... No! No! No!

    allenTue Oct 14, 10:17:00 PM EDT
    “AshTue Oct 14, 09:32:00 PM EDT
    The US should quit trying pick the winners and losers and simply interact economically with the various partners it deems reasonable and helpful to her interest.”

    Why hasn’t anyone thought of that before? Someone did: the U.S. in WWI. The Germans were not impressed with what appeared to be deceit by neutrality and started sinking ships right and left. Eventually, this led to the sinking of the Lusitania which, by the way, was carrying munitions. See: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1098904/Secret-Lusitania-Arms-challenges-Allied-claims-solely-passenger-ship.html
    “The diving team estimates that around four million rounds of U.S.-manufactured Remington .303 bullets lie in the Lusitania's hold at a depth of 300ft…
    'Now that we've found it, the British can't deny any more that there was ammunition on board. That raises the question of what else was on board.
    'There were literally tons and tons of stuff stored in unrefrigerated cargo holds that were dubiously marked cheese, butter and oysters.
    'I've always felt there were some significant high explosives in the holds - shells, powder, gun cotton - that were set off by the torpedo and the inflow of water. That's what sank the ship.'”

    Well, Ash, before you can say “Rumpelstiltskin” the U.S. was at war, quite innocently, of course.

    My next installment will be on how the Zionist Chaim Weizmann, holder of a PhD in chemistry, saved the British Empire by inventing a fermentation process for the mass production of acetone. It seems that before going to war in 1914 someone forgot to inventory the acetone stocks. By 1915, the Brits were almost taken out of the war because of a lack of artillery propellant. Weizmann was offered a knighthood, but asked for a small piece of land instead. His request was granted, but through usual British perfidy was stolen from his people. Despite Britain’s best efforts, Israel was established and Weizmann became her first president.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All Chaim Weizmann was something from the British that was not theirs to give.

      Delete
    2. All Chaim Weizmann wanted was something from the British that was not theirs to give.

      Delete
    3. allen,

      Let's ignore the fact that IS subs are not patrolling international waters blockading their enemies ports sinking US passenger ships clandestinely supply arms to their enemies - what is your end game in this? Do you think the US should go all in, occupy the region, and execute a modern day Marshall plan (WWI did necessitate WWII) rebuilding a functioning economy and democracy for the whole region?

      Delete
    4. “Jack HawkinsWed Oct 15, 05:41:00 AM EDT
      All Chaim Weizmann wanted was something from the British that was not theirs to give.”

      During the mid-15th C., C.E., the Ottoman Turks took possession of Judea, Samaria, and the remainder of the Levant through right of conquest. While maintaining ownership of most of the territory, large tract of land were dispersed through vassalage or purchase to members of the Ottoman nobility. Some of the new owners rented land to Bedouins generally. There were few Arabs in the Levant at that time. Indeed, Arabs in substantial numbers did not migrate to the region until the end of the 19th C., C.E., as Jewish settlements and businesses were established, offering employment. These Jews had not conquered any of the land upon which they dwelled but had purchased their holdings generally from absentee landlords or from the Ottoman authorities. With the Jewish purchase of land came deeds and title. Thus, by the end of the 19th C., C.E., there existed three categories of occupancy in the Levant: 1) landowners, 2) renters, and 3) squatters.

      With the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the League of Nations took control of administering the Levant by unanimous consent of its membership. Thus the Mandate for Palestine became law and the British became the Mandatory (trustee of sorts). Under In its capacity of Mandatory, Great Britain proposed a Mandate which would become the homeland of Jews if approved by the League of Nations. By unanimous consent, the Mandate of 1922 became international law in perpetuity. The Mandate of 1922 remains law. Title to the Mandate was conferred upon the trustees of several Zionist organizations. Within the territory of the Mandate were the Golan, Judea, Samaria, and Gaza. Moreover, states Article V: ARTICLE 5. “The Mandatory shall be responsible for seeing that no Palestine territory shall be ceded or leased to, or in any way placed under the control of the Government of any foreign Power.” With its usual disregard for law, the UK repeatedly violated this Article. Be that as it may, The Mandate did not grant any national political rights to Arabs. As to ownership of land within the Mandate there were 1) landowners (particularly the state), 2) renters, and 3) squatters.

      While Israel’s several wars have momentarily changed the boundaries of the Mandate, say, the illegal occupation of Jerusalem and Judea and Samaria from 1948 – 1967, to date the only legally binding document regarding the so-called West Bank, Gaza, and the Golan remains the Mandate. As to a Palestinian people, the ICJ has rejected such a claim on at least three occasions because there never was a land of Palestine. Only the abject failure of Israeli politicians to face up to their duties has brought anything about the Mandate into question.

      As to property law, a renter does not inherit at the demise of the title holder. Occupancy does not establish title to land except under a few exceptional circumstances under American law but inapplicable here. Squatters are trespassers except under a few circumstances under American law but inapplicable here. Therefore, all those Palestinian refugees had no legal claim to property within the Mandate unless the title to that property was protected under a recognizable deed. In short, as the matter of law, the Palestinians are SOL.

      https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/Palestine_Mandate.html
      British Palestine Mandate:
      Text of the Mandate
      (July 24, 1922)

      Delete
    5. Hell no, America should exploit all it's fossil fuels and destroy the need or use for middle eastern opec oil.

      Then destroy, from the air, all modern infrastructure.

      oh and arm the kurds...

      Delete
  23. This is VIETNAM 1975 all over again. Nobody wanted to fight & die for South Vietnam and it is now the same for Iraq. One BDE (Three thousand ISIL fighters) took on FOUR IRAQI DIVISIONS (60K soldiers) and the Iraqis melted away like a snow flake in a hot firing pan. Air power is sexy but essentually meaningless against small bands of dedicated irregular forces---one needs boots on the ground to stop ISIL. Say we we crushed ISIL. Then what? Run with Honour, part Duex? Stay and fight the fourth HUNDRED YEARS WAR?
    1. The KURDS will want their own KURDISHSTAN because like, what? Al Malaki and his non existant Iraqi Army are going to prevent them from breaking up IRAQ? The KURDS A-R-E the Iraqi Army---they are the only force preventing Baghdadi from seizing Baghdad!!!
    2. Arm the Kurds and you will have Turkey seeing blood as they are in the final negiotions with the PPK and don't want them with an edge.
    3. Iran, as Putin suggests could easily push the ISIL out of Syria & Iraq. But that comes with baggage too. Iran will want a Nuclear Deal to do that and Obama will balk doing that because Israel will go ballastic at anything which helps Iran.
    4. Who also hates ISIL? Al Queda, that's who, The Nestra Front is the Al Queda affiliate in Syria who are the mortal enemies of ISIL so if we play our cards right, we can form a coalition with whom against ISIL---AL QUEDA!!!
    5. Syria is also a go to playah against ISIL and Syrian assistance would be welcomed by Israel because Syria has kept the peace. Problem is Syria is an evil kingdom and is politically unacceptable as America's bedroom buddy in the middle east.
    6. Hesbollah in Lebbonon is fighting for Asaad which makes Hesbollah the mortal enemy of Al Queda and friend to the State of Israel.

    Califate Baghdadi is not some Jockey of Camels from some Yemani but a seasoned Iraq-Iran War Veteran. While under US custody, he searched for the best COLONELS in American lock up he could find to put his infrastructure together. ISIL consists of dispossessed Bathists, dispossessed Sunnis and whatever unemployed Chechnyian/ Ex-CCCP youth who want to fight for something better that they currently have now. My money says the well financed & lead ISIL should take Baghdad in four weeks with or without American Air Power. Who is left to fight for the defense of Baghdad---the Iraqi Army? The Kurds? No, wait---it will be defended by Muchdi Saddar and his Saadar City followers??? Let it go, Obamma!!! You took one of America's strongest Ally in the Regen, Big Mo Ghadafi and transformed Lybia into a FAILED STATE/TERRORIST Breeding Ground by your intervention. Let it all go under, obama. $16 Trillion dollars spent so that 4 divisions of Iraqi troops can take a power? Let it go, Son!!!

    What I want to know is who is funding ISIL & why? They are massively bankrolled, possibly by UAE or Saudi Arabia.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Daesh is bankrolled by the ..
      In broad daylight, a Saudi-Israeli alliance
      ---------------------------------

      Saudi Israeli alliance forged in blood
      ---------------------------------

      Understanding the Israeli-Egyptian-Saudi alliance

      To include the US, training and funding the anti-Assad forces in Syria.
      The US was with Daesh, before it was against Daesh.

      Delete
    2. America has supported Saudi Arabia for 60 years.

      Still does.

      Supplies it with protection and arms.

      U.S. Seeks $10.8 Billion Weapons Sale to U.A.E., Saudis

      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-15/u-s-seeks-10-8-billion-weapons-sale-to-u-a-e-saudis.html

      Delete
  24. Ash, this is for you too, though you don't show the extreme anti all things Judaic or Israeli as some others.......

    Deuce, sometimes you sound like rat.

    Think of it this way......Israel is our front line.

    Or think of a canary in a coal mine.

    Or think of a base right in the middle of enemy territory.

    The arab world is pledged to kill us too, you know.

    Surely you have read your Koran by now.

    What does it say?

    It says subjugate people JUST LIKE YOU.

    And you sit there and cough up quotes from........Pontius Pilate !

    Well Jesus Christ !

    Further, Israel is the higher civilization in the area. We have a human duty to support the higher culture.

    And, I have already told you why.

    Read your William James.

    There, you will be told we should support those cultures and peoples according to their "fruits for life".

    This is a human duty.

    You have to start somewhere in judging these things and I challenge you to do better than William James.

    If you think Hamas, ISIS, Iran, etc create more 'fruits for life" than Israel then I say you have lost your mind.

    I have no idea where you get your animosity for Israel but you show it nearly every day.
    .......................

    Or, more simply, you could just think about women's rights, and judge the issue from that point of view.

    Women are not treated well in arabic and Moslem cultures, to say the least, and we all realize, or certainly should realize, that by now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nor are women treated well in Hindu countries, Christians countries or Judaic countries.
      Women are not treated well.

      Thousands of slaves in Israel, global study finds

      According to the study, the first-ever country-by-country survey of its kind, Israel has 7,700 to 8,500 slaves. Still, Israel ranked well relative to the lower standards in the Middle East, though Lebanon, Tunisia, and Egypt scored better than the Jewish state
      ...
      The trend in Israel is driven by the sex trade and the human trafficking that comes with it. There are 15,000 prostitutes in Israel, Rebecca Hughes from ATZUM’s Task Force on Human Trafficking wrote in The Times of Israel, entering the profession at an average age of 14.

      “By the 1990’s Israel was established as a destination country for trafficking, and international sex trafficking victims had replaced the local market,” Hughes wrote. “Israel’s flesh trade was booming and making between half a billion to three quarters of a billion dollars a year. It was a particularly desirable market for traffickers because the purchase of sexual services was, and still is, legal in Israel. ”


      Read more: Thousands of slaves in Israel, global study finds | The Times of Israel http://www.timesofisrael.com/thousands-of-slaves-in-israel-global-study-finds/#ixzz3GCi99Rck
      Follow us: @timesofisrael on Twitter | timesofisrael on Facebook

      Delete
    2. Bob,

      It would be nice if you did a little bit of research on Women and Judaism, maybe even look at the similar conception of Women in the Talmud and the Koran. Take a look at how the Ultra Orthodox Jews view women and compare to the radical Islam view of women. Then you might reflect on how useful it is to take the examples of the religious extremes as evidence of the whole religion.


      But that might interfere with your pre-conceptions, is a little bit of work, and might require you to think critically for a change. I know you won't even try.

      Delete
    3. Ash, until ultra orthodox Jewish women are hung from cranes, stoned and have their clits chopped off?

      you are full of shit.

      Delete
    4. What is "Occupation"Wed Oct 15, 09:46:00 AM EDT
      Ash, until ultra orthodox Jewish women are hung from cranes, stoned and have their clits chopped off?

      you are full of shit.


      So much more could be said; but when people compare an ostracized gang of criminals, never numbering more than 100, with the Third Reich, the "little gray cells" are just not there for a rational debate.

      Delete
    5. allen, you are the one who compared the current situation with IS to the US entry in WWI. Heck, you even decided it was such a great analogy you reposted it in this thread.

      Delete
    6. Ash,

      I was not referring to your "little gray cells" ... sorry ...

      Delete
  25. Ash, Deuce, if you had a daughter would you rather she grow up in Israel or some Moslem shit hole?

    If you are truthful you cannot help but say........Israel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not if she had to live as a Palestinian, in Israel, dimwit.

      Delete
    2. Why support those that murdered US sailors "Draft Dodger" Peterson?

      Why give them a dime, or another drop of blood?

      Delete
    3. According to the study, the first-ever country-by-country survey of its kind, Israel has 7,700 to 8,500 slaves. Still, Israel ranked well relative to the lower standards in the Middle East, though Lebanon, Tunisia, and Egypt scored better than the Jewish state
      The Times of Israel http://www.timesofisrael.com/thousands-of-slaves-in-israel-global-study-finds/#ixzz3GCi99Rck

      Delete
    4. Once again the lies of Robert "Draft Dodger" Peterson are exposed, by an Israeli source.

      Delete
    5. Re: The Times of Israel; alleged slavery in Israel. The Times replies:

      "Your search - The Times of Israel http://www.timesofisrael.com/thousands-of-slaves-in-israel-global-study ... - did not match any documents"

      So, we have been given another bogus, non-existent site to steer the unwary wrong. The Desert Rat strikes again, using the Goebbels' plan.

      Delete
    6. An article was found which purports to measure the "risk" of slavery, considering prostitution as slavery. Neither Gaza nor the PA were allegedly "studied". Obviously, a very scientific approach was used: allege something bad about Jews and ignore the Palestinians ... then don't answer the phone ...

      "It relied on secondary sources for its study, especially reports from media, NGOs, and governments. It also used local surveys and interviews."


      "The Walk Free Foundation could not be reached for clarification by the time of publication." Hmm ... make a claim and then don't answer the phone ...

      http://www.timesofisrael.com/thousands-of-slaves-in-israel-global-study-finds/



      Delete
    7. Jack HawkinsWed Oct 15, 05:05:00 AM EDT
      Why support those that murdered US sailors "Draft Dodger" Peterson?

      Why give them a dime, or another drop of blood?





      You support Iran, Hezbollah and Assad of Syria.

      They have murdered scores and scores of America GI's, from the Marine barracks in Lebanon, to kidnapping and torture of American Diplomats and citizens, to providing liquid copper IED's in Iraq to use against a thousand American GI's.

      One one standard for those that support Israel, and no standards for you?

      Delete
  26. In absolute numbers, India led the list with up to 14.7 million slaves, followed by China and Pakistan. ...

    Ireland, Iceland, and the UK enjoy the lowest prevalence of slavery, the survey said.


    Funny stuff, our little piece of "O"rdure was just telling us that the UK was 'lost'.

    No slave trade in the UK, is that the "Standard" that "O"rdure uses?
    Does he equate "Slavery" with "Freedom"?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Draft Dodger" Peterson still occasionally trots out the idea that the largest "Slave Holding Nation", India, should become a NATO member.

      Delete
    2. One has to wonder, what ever happen to cause Robert "Draft Dodger" Peterson to lose his moral compass?
      To want to send others US citizens off to fight and die, while he, himself, dodged the draft, back in the day.

      What is it that makes Kurdish Muslims so much more valuable in his mind than Vietnamese Christians and Buddhists?
      Why would he want to commit the US to defend Muslims and Jews, but not Christians, not Alawites, and not Buddhists?

      Why does he focus on the religion of some ethnicities and nations, but ignores the religious component completely in other cases?

      Why does Robert "Draft Dodger" Peterson not maintain the same standard for all of the countries and peoples?

      Delete
    3. Jack HawkinsWed Oct 15, 05:45:00 AM EDT
      "Draft Dodger" Peterson

      With what unit did you serve in Central America? Is that where you took up polo, old boy?

      Delete
  27. Jack follows Bob around like a dog on a lease.

    Always making the same stupid comments.

    Bob is right. And he is not the only one that wants Quirk to put up his "rat free" blog.

    Rat is a thirteen year old emotional and intellectual moron.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Robert Paterson is a Draft Dodger, he is free to move on.
      Lest we forget, he abandoned his responsibility to his nation, while 50,000 of his fellow citizens did not, and died.

      Delete
    2. While Robert "Draft Dodger" Peterson dodged the draft, untold numbers of his peers were wounded, fulfilling their obligation to their nation.

      Robert "Draft Dodger" Peterson - We will not forget nor forgive your cowardice.

      Delete
  28. Reporter: Were the Protocols followed?

    Nurse from Presbyterian Hospital: There Were No Protocols.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brainiac Perry, and the other Red State Governors continue to starve their hospitals of money by refusing $Billions, in Texas' case alone, of Federal Medicaid Dollars.

      Going broke, the hospitals in these states don't have the money for Training, Equipment, Staffing, etc.

      These guys should be stripped down, and horsewhipped.

      They're not just putting the poor, and vulnerable at risk; they're putting EVERYBODY at risk.

      Delete
    2. The hospital in question wasn't lacking for money, it was lacking in expertise in how to handle this new and very deadly virus.

      Right now, what can you do to protect yourself?

      Get a flu shot.

      You are much more at risk from dying from the flu than from Ebola in the United States.

      This may change, but that is the case as I type.

      Delete
    3. The Rufus 30 day pre-flight quarantine for people flying to the USA is an excellent idea.

      Delete
  29. Good news !

    In Colorado, the Senate race seems to be slipping away from the Democrats -

    Polling Data
    Poll Date Sample MoE Gardner (R) Udall (D) Spread
    RCP Average 9/20 - 10/13 -- -- 46.2 44.2 Gardner +2.0
    CNN/Opinion Research 10/9 - 10/13 665 LV 4.0 50 46 Gardner +4
    Denver Post/SurveyUSA* 10/9 - 10/12 LV 4.1 45 43 Gardner +2
    FOX News 10/4 - 10/7 739 LV 3.5 43 37 Gardner +6
    CBS News/NYT/YouGov 9/20 - 10/1 1634 LV 3.0 45 48 Udall +3
    Rasmussen Reports 9/29 - 9/30 950 LV 3.0 48 47 Gardner +1

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And more Good News ! -

      Scott Brown Jumps Ahead in Polls for the First Time
      by Matthew Boyle 14 Oct 2014 138 post a comment

      Scott Brown, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen debate
      WMUR - Manchester, NH
      New Hampshire GOP U.S. Senate nominee Scott Brown has taken the lead in the polls for the first time over incumbent Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), a new poll from New England College shows.

      The poll of 1,081 likely New Hampshire voters conducted on Oct. 9 found Brown is leading Shaheen 48 percent to 46.9 percent. The 1.1 percent lead is within the 2.98 percent margin of error, but it’s the first time in 2014 Brown has been shown to be leading Shaheen in any poll.

      It comes after a brutal series of political bouts between Brown and Shaheen. Brown has hammered Shaheen and President Barack Obama for being too soft on immigration, creating national security and public health risks while ISIS terrorists surge into more power in the Middle East and Ebola runs rampant through Africa and has crossed into America due to Thomas Eric Duncan—the first case diagnosed in the U.S.—allegedly lying to immigration agents to get into the U.S. when asked if he had come in contact with the disease.

      Interestingly, this new poll shows Brown has actually picked up a point and a half with women voters since the previous New England College poll on Oct. 3. The previous poll showed Brown getting 41.9 percent of female voters—while the new poll shows Brown getting 43.1 percent among female voters.

      That’s significant because it suggests a series of Democratic Party and Shaheen campaign attacks on Brown in the vein of the infamous 2012 “war on women” have either fallen flat or backfired.

      The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee launched a bizarre attack on Brown last week, saying he was “sexually active at 18”—an attack that twisted the meaning of what Brown actually said during a debate. In the wake of that attack, Shaheen’s campaign went up with an ad that mischaracterized Brown’s pro-choice positions on abortion......

      http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/10/14/Scott-Brown-Jumps-Ahead-In-Polls-For-The-First-Time

      Delete
  30. Jack HawkinsWed Oct 15, 05:05:00 AM EDT
    Why support those that murdered US sailors "Draft Dodger" Peterson?

    Why give them a dime, or another drop of blood?





    You support Iran, Hezbollah and Assad of Syria.

    They have murdered scores and scores of America GI's, from the Marine barracks in Lebanon, to kidnapping and torture of American Diplomats and citizens, to providing liquid copper IED's in Iraq to use against a thousand American GI's.

    One one standard for those that support Israel, and no standards for you?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wrong again, "O"rdure.

      I have listened to the President, who, in accordance with US Law has determined that Daesh, is al-Qeada, and is part of the International Terrorist conspiracy that is targeting the US.

      The US is at war with Daesh, its supporters and confederates.
      Israel is a supporter of Daesh. So said the Israeli Ambassador to the US, just one year ago.
      So say the images of Bibi giving aid and comfort to al-Qeada terrorists in Israeli hospitals.
      The US should, at the ery least, cut all aid to Israel, withdraw the loan guarantees and begin to implement economic sanctions against that government.

      The US is not at war with Syria, Lebanon or Iran.
      Those three polities are also at war with Daesh.
      We should support those polities that are allied with US, in our conflict with International terrorists, as determined by the President, in accordance to US Law.

      Whomever they may be.

      Just as the US was allied with Stalin's Soviet Union, which was the most wicked regime in the world, both prior and during WWII.

      Delete
    2. The US should, at the very least, cut all aid to Israel, withdraw the loan guarantees and begin to implement economic sanctions against that government.

      Delete
    3. Deuce should, at the very least, cut you off completely, you anti-semitic racist.

      Delete
    4. Please, post the date stamped quotes that are 'anti-semitic' or racist.

      If you could, you would, but you cannot.
      There is the quote where I describe the Israeli as the "Scum of the Earth", but that is neither ani-semitic nor racist.

      The Israeli being Europeans, not Semites.
      Israeli being a nationality not a race.

      Hardy har har.
      Words have meanings, Humpty Dumpty.

      Delete

    5. Hell, at least 20% of Israeli are Russians, and nearly half of them are not even Jewish, according to Judaic Law.
      But they are "Scum of the Earth", in the Apartheid State of Israel.

      They could elevate their status, easily enough.
      But they enjoy their status as Scum.

      Delete
    6. ... powerful logic ... You must be reading from the same page as Quirk ... just when I thought things might be becoming civilized ...

      Delete
    7. Someday, when Jack/rat is on his death bed, I want him to think of this moment, and remember his passing? Will improve the planet.

      Delete
  31. Ah, these rat free early morning hours are lovely, are they not?!

    But yon sun will soon be up in the east and I've a big day ahead.......

    In alphabetical order:

    allen
    Anonymous
    Ash
    Quirk
    WiO

    keep the rat child contained today like the world wishes to do the Ebola virus.

    ;)

    ReplyDelete
  32. Replies
    1. A 2.80% Thirty Year Bond.

      What a wonderful time this would be for the U.S. Government to borrow $300 Billion, and build 3,000 Cellulosic Ethanol Refineries.

      Delete
    2. Betcha anything that the Feds could turn around and auction them off at a profit.

      Delete
  33. .

    With the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the League of Nations took control of administering the Levant by unanimous consent of its membership. Thus the Mandate for Palestine became law and the British became the Mandatory (trustee of sorts). Under In its capacity of Mandatory, Great Britain proposed a Mandate which would become the homeland of Jews if approved by the League of Nations. By unanimous consent, the Mandate of 1922 became international law in perpetuity. The Mandate of 1922 remains law. Title to the Mandate was conferred upon the trustees of several Zionist organizations. Within the territory of the Mandate were the Golan, Judea, Samaria, and Gaza. Moreover, states Article V: ARTICLE 5. “The Mandatory shall be responsible for seeing that no Palestine territory shall be ceded or leased to, or in any way placed under the control of the Government of any foreign Power.” With its usual disregard for law, the UK repeatedly violated this Article. Be that as it may, The Mandate did not grant any national political rights to Arabs. As to ownership of land within the Mandate there were 1) landowners (particularly the state), 2) renters, and 3) squatters.


    More re-writing of history by the Jewish Virtual Library.

    .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ... wrong library ...

      The copy of the Mandate of 1922 is a matter of public record.

      A review of the Mandate map of 1922 will show the presence of the Golan, Gaza, Judea, and Samaria within the Jewish (Zionist) homeland.

      You confuse me with someone else. I do not need to make up history or find historical revisionists. My personal library and that texts available on the internet, covering this history from all angles, are used by me.

      Re: Jewish Virtual Library

      I avoid it.

      Delete
    2. “In Chapters 46, 39, 52 and 56 of his Innocents Abroad, American author Mark Twain wrote of his visit to Palestine in 1867: ‘Palestine sits in sackcloth and ashes. Over it broods the spell of a curse that has withered its fields and fettered its energies. Palestine is desolate and unlovely – Palestine is no more of this workday world. It is sacred to poetry and tradition, it is dreamland.’(Chapter 56) ‘There was hardly a tree or a shrub anywhere. Even the olive and the cactus, those fast friends of a worthless soil, had almost deserted the country’. (Chapter 52) ‘A desolation is here that not even imagination can grace with the pomp of life and action. We reached Tabor safely. We never saw a human being on the whole route’. (Chapter 49) ‘There is not a solitary village throughout its whole extent – not for thirty miles in either direction. ...One may ride ten miles (16 km) hereabouts and not see ten human beings.’ ...these unpeopled deserts, these rusty mounds of barrenness...(Chapter 46)”

      “Jewish settlers in the 1880s attempted to inhabit the Hula valley, but in some places child mortality rates were nearly 100% because of disease.” “A Survey of Palestine,” prepared in December 1945 and January 1946 for the Information of the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry, Vol. II p. 714, as cited in Avneri, p. 252.

      “The Talmud remarks, ‘If the Garden of Eden is in the Land of Israel, Beit-Shean is its gateway.’ But when the scholar H.B. Tristram visited the area in the 1860s, traveling in the footsteps of Jesus, he claimed, ‘We saw not a tree....It is scarcely conceivable how any human beings can inhabit such sites; but such is the contrast, nowhere more settling than here, between ancient civilization and modern degradation.’” Arieh Avneri, “The Claim of Dispossession” (Efal, Israel: Yad Tabenkin, 1982), p. 11.

      The Rt Hon Sir Martin John Gilbert, CBE, PC. Magdalen College, Oxford; St Antony's College, Oxford; Honorary Doctorate, Oxford. Official biographer of Sir Winston Churchill. Author of 85 books.
      Sir John points out an increase in Arab immigration into Palestine, following the arrival of Jewish land developers/farmers and business owners.

      Delete
    3. :)

      I have pointed out Twain's writings about the area myself.

      Delete
    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    5. .

      Re: Jewish Virtual Library

      I avoid it.



      My apologies to the Jewish Virtual Library. You referenced it below your post and I mistakenly assumed that was where you got the content of your post. A closer look and I would have instead assumed your post originated from Myths and Facts or seekingthetruth or some such.

      Regardless of the source, the post appears to be an attempt at re-writing history.

      By unanimous consent, the Mandate of 1922 became international law in perpetuity.

      No. You reference the original Mandate. The only mention of 'in perpetuity' in the document is in reference to couple of the articles dealing with access to existing religious shrines and freedom of religion.

      The Mandate of 1922 remains law.

      Nonsense. Otherwise, you would be admitting that the state of Israel is illegal and you have stolen land from the Palestinians.

      Title to the Mandate was conferred upon the trustees of several Zionist organizations.

      Pure bullshit. Title to the Mandate? What the hell does that actually mean? I think I know what it implies. All that the Mandate did was designate what Jewish groups (at the time of the Mandate) would act as official representative of the Jews in Palestine.

      The Mandate did not grant any national political rights to Arabs.

      More weasel wording. The mandate indicated that nothing in the Mandate would prejudice the civil or religious rights of the existing non-Jewish population.

      You seem to be suffering under the mistaken understanding that the 1922 Palestinian Mandate somehow dictated a future Israeli 'state' when in fact it did not. What was envisioned at the time of the Mandate was eventually one Palestinian state shared by Jews and non-Jews under one government but with separate autonomous areas set up for Jews and non-Jews.

      While what is said about Jews being able to live wherever they wanted throughout Palestine is true, the same can be said about the non-Jews, but it was assumed that the populations would voluntarily segregate into the non-Jewish Palestinian territory and the "Jewish Homeland".

      The Mandate made no distinction between the Jews and non-Jews in Palestine other than to facilitate creation of a homeland for immigrating Jews.

      Heck, I don't even think the Zionists actually came out and started demanding an actual Jewish "state" in Palestine until around 1940.

      .

      You seem to be suggesting that the Mandate of 1922 granted the entirety of Palestine solely to Jews. That is wrong.

      .




      Delete
  34. .

    Jack HawkinsWed Oct 15, 05:39:00 AM EDT

    Except the fuel needed to power all that "Detroit Steel".
    You know, the 300 illion vehicles that are in the US.

    The Middle East still provides about 22% of that.



    What is it about the word fungible you don't understand, rat.

    The US will always get its share of the world's oil. Hell, we have the biggest pinting presses.

    .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fungible is not another word for magic. 22% of Nothing is Nothing.

      Yeah, I know, Middleeast oil production would not fall to zero, but I very much doubt that it would hold at anywhere near present levels.

      Delete
    2. But, let's say that Iraqi production only dropped to 2 million bbl/day. Do we really want the headcutters to have access to $200 Million / Day?

      365 days at $200,000,000.00 / day = $73 Billion / year.

      Delete
    3. Don't buy from them. Boycott them. Probably easier to organize a boycott than to herd the cats to bomb 'em and put boots on the ground.

      Delete
    4. .

      Do we really want the headcutters to have access to $200 Million / Day?

      Of course not, but it's not my problem. The oil will be there, the oil will be sold, the US will get its share.

      .

      Delete
  35. .

    AshWed Oct 15, 07:37:00 AM EDT

    I have answered your question already Quirk - the USA should stand down in the ME. Doubling down on a bad bet is not a viable strategy for victory.


    Deep thoughts from, Ash, as he ponders while waiting to tee off on the 8th hole.

    That ship has sailed son. Perhaps, you missed it.

    Victory? Who the hell is talking about victory'. There will always 'victory'. We define victory after our wars.

    POTUS has been telling the world that we are going to war with IS, an enemy that is not only a threat to the US but an existential threat to the world. John Kerry has been begging and browbeating for months and found 60 nations that have agreed to 'do something'. We have been bombing sites in 2 countries for 2 months. We forced the president of Iraq out of office. Videos of IS beheading Americans because of the bombing are all over the inner tubes. IS continues its assaults in Iraq and Syria and in some areas has been winning. The president is getting beat up right and left for his handling of the war.

    And you suggest he says, "Sorry folks, we were just kidding. Take your planes and go home. We'll call you if we need you in the future."

    Insightful, Ash.

    Have a drink for me when you get to the 19th hole.

    .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They shouldn't have invaded and occupied Iraq, I said so then. They shouldn't have mustered the bombing coalition especially without mustering a coalition of ground forces and I said so then. They did it anyway. We can go back in history and say 'they shouldn't have' but they did. Yes, that is a fact one can not change.

      The US has mustered a bombing coalition and they should stand it down. The POTUS can easily say 'look, none of the allies, including US are willing to occupy the place so we shall let them sort it out on their own'. To forever move forward doing stupid things because stupid things were done in the past is, well, stupid some would say crazy.

      What is the end game Quirk in your plan? The bombing plan doesn't seem to have much of a successful future in store or do you disagree - the US should just keep on bombing? The other option is to go full bore, occupy the place, set up elections and see if we can't train them to all just get along and respect the power that flows from the ballot box. It didn't work last time and I don't see it working in the future.

      So, in short - bombing, and only bombing is a bad plan. Going in with the full monty is a bad plan. Don't go in, deal with the headcutters success by isolating them economically (i.e. like Iran) and let the local powers deal with the. It would be interesting to see how Turkey, Iran, Saudi Arabia et al choose to deal with IS without the US. I truly don't think things would be worse for the US than it all ready is.

      Delete
    2. i agree ash. Saddam Hussein was the best thing ever. He was responsible for killing more arabs, iranians and moslems than anyone else in the history of the world and stopping him? The biggest error ever. I stand with you Ash, America should NEVER have stopped the slaughter of those so deserving.

      Ash you are an inspiration to us all

      Delete
    3. .

      Talking about how we were against this intervention, or the GWB fiasco, might make us feel smug and self-satisfied but it won't do anything to help. Every thing about this FUBAR mess is screwed up.

      1. The coalition is a joke. The US should have never asked for it in the first place. A few planes here, a few there, aren't going to make a difference. In the end it will be the US doing the heavy lifting. The coalition just puts obstacles in our way.
      2. Having the Saudi's train 4000 of the FSA. Another joke. All the Saudi's will do is make them more efficient terrorists. The Saudis aren't likely to turn the FSA away from the main target, Assad.
      3. We all know we can't 'defeat' IS in the sense that Baghdadi turns over his sword and signs an unconditional surrender. The most we can do is 'diminish' them, take out as many as we can, destroy any infrastructure and equipment they have, dry up their financing, and stop them in Iraq. Bombing in Syria will help but any stopping them there, other than the bombing, will have to be left to Assad and internecine warfare.

      As far as options,

      IMO, what you suggest, after going to war for 2 months of fighting, to tell the world "Hey, this isn't working out the way we thought it would so we are going home" just isn't a viable option. You say it couldn't be any worse; yet, I think it could.

      What is the end game Quirk in your plan?

      Somehow getting this conflict to a point where we can 'declare victory and go home' (even if that point is well short of our original goal) and to do it in the least costly (politically and in lives and treasure) way possible. This might require modifying our goals or escalating our response.

      For instance, so far the goals set out by Obama have been pretty general, to degrade and destroy ISIL. I'm sure the vagueness is by design. So how we ultimately define our final goal will determine its cost.

      I think everyone could agree we shouldn't in any way get into the middle of the Syrian civil war; therefore, we have to decide what we want for Iraq. Can we settle for the current status quo, the Iraqi government and the Kurds on one side and we cede Anbar Province to IS or any Sunnis that can kicked them out. Or, do we try to kick IS out of Iraq entirely.

      If the latter, it might be well to remember in 2005-2007, there were only about 6900 Al-Qaeda fighters in Iraq and it took 150,000 US, a couple hundred thousand Iraqi forces, the Sunni awakening, and the surge to kick them out of cities there.

      What is the end game Quirk in your plan?

      Bloody ISIS to the extent possible and get out of Iraq as quickly as possible with the least damage to lives and reputation.

      (continued below)

      .

      Delete
    4. .

      continued...



      The bombing plan doesn't seem to have much of a successful future in store or do you disagree...

      Despite what others here say, I just haven't seen that much bombing. I have no way of knowing why it is so. Is it by intent? Do we lack intel? Has IS adapted and dispersed to the point we can't find them? I don't know. However, if it's possible to find them, we should be throwing everything at them. Use everything we have available, planes, copters, or even (gulp) drones.

      Hell, look at Kobane. IS was attacking there for weeks, long before they made it to the city. Out in the open desert. Some mock the B-52 but if ISIS is too dispersed for an ordinary attack set the friggin desert on fire. Or use AC-130H Spectres or whatever has replaced them if they have been replaced. Do whatever it takes. The same applies in Iraq. Why didn't we supply air support to that military base around Hit? If the air offensive doesn't work then you have to move on.

      Weasel wording doesn't solve anything. Rummy was smart enough (at least in a general sense) to suggest that 'you don't fight a war with the army you want, you fight it with the army you've got'. Once you have set you objective, if air power doesn't work, you may be forced, as Deuce suggested, to put combat troops in to do the job.

      So, in short - bombing, and only bombing is a bad plan. Going in with the full monty is a bad plan. Don't go in, deal with the headcutters success by isolating them economically (i.e. like Iran) and let the local powers deal with the.

      IMO, there are no good plans, its merely a matter of bad or worse, I doubt trying to isolate them economically would be real effective and definitely not sufficient, and the locals have so far proved they are unable to 'deal with it'.

      I truly don't think things would be worse for the US than it all ready is.

      You might have been right before we went in. Now, I would have to disagree.

      .

      Delete
    5. One of the problems I think is endemic to the west and is exhibited in your analysis Quirk is the role the national borders play in the Middle East. You say we should stay out of the civil war in Syria but fight in Iraq. I don't think the people of the region really see it in those nationalistic terms but rather view things through the lens of their sect, their tribe, their religion. By taking on IS we are getting mired in the much larger *civil* war that is simmering between Shiites and Sunnis. I don't think it is so simple as Shites vs Sunnis but rather a seething cauldron of all sorts and that big divide looms over it all. The US really doesn't have the knowledge or the desire to sort it all out for them but we keep trying...

      Delete
    6. and when the US tries, and fails, folk use that failure as the reason to try again.

      Delete
    7. .

      As to borders, regardless of the fighting there Syria exist as a national entity and no one there, the recognized government, nor the militants have asked the US in. On the other hand, the US has been asked to intervene in Iraq by the official government. That point of law may be insignificant to you but others would disagree.

      .

      Delete
    8. I agree the borders do matter to some extent but much less than what we in the west think. The US has pretty well shot to hell the convention of military interventions backed by international law with the bombing runs in Syria being just one example of the abandonment of international law justifications being desired.

      Delete
  36. Told'ja


    (Reuters) - Kurdish forces making a stand against Islamic State fighters in Kobani say they have begun coordinating with the U.S. military to provide targets for air strikes, helping to halt the advance of the fighters through the Syrian frontline town.

    A four-week siege of . . . . . .

    Air Drops, Next?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. PanARMENIAN.Net - U.S. aircraft carried out 18 strikes on Islamic State positions near the besieged Syrian border town of Kobani and five strikes against the group in Iraq on Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct 15, the U.S. military's Central Command said, according to Reuters.

      The planes struck 16 buildings occupied by Islamic State militants and destroyed several of their fighting positions near Kobani, a Kurdish town on the Syrian border with Turkey, it said in a statement on Wednesday.

      It said four strikes near Baiji, the site of Iraq's largest oil refinery, destroyed an artillery piece, a Humvee, a machine gun and a building used by the group, which has seized large parts of Iraqand Syria.

      Another strike near Haditha Dam in Iraq destroyed an armed vehicle, the statement said.

      On Tuesday, U.S. President Barack Obama met with military leaders from a coalition including Arab states, Turkey and Western allies that he is leading in the fight against Islamic State.

      "Coalition air strikes will continue in both of these areas," Obama said during the meeting outside Washington, voicing deep concern about the situation in Kobani as well as in Iraq's Anbar province, which is at risk of being seized by Islamic State militants.

      Aircraft from some of the coalition partners joined U.S. planes in previous air strikes in Syria and Iraq, but Wednesday's statement made no mention of any other country participating in the latest attacks.

      The U.S. military has named the coalition operation against Islamic State in Iraq and Syria "Inherent Resolve," a U.S. military official said on Wednesday.

      Delete
    2. .

      Told'ja what, Ruf?

      You've told us a lot of things.

      :o)


      .

      Delete
    3. I said two or three days ago that we were communicating with the Kurds in Kobane (remember, when the headcutters took a police station, and we bombed it just a short while later?)

      Delete
  37. The media is trying, mightily, to turn this into a story - a "horse race," if you will.

    Don't be fooled. This isn't a "contest;" it's a killing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. riiiight, it's all just the media making things up - like Yazidi's stranded on a mountain top, Kobanis facing slaughter. Just the media making shit up to entertain (unless, of course, the media reports support the Rufus storyline - then it is the truth).

      Delete
    2. The Kurds have been "facing slaughter" for a thousand years, or more.

      The coalition has killed, probably, close to two thousand headcutters, and the media comes back with "Yeah, but some Isis have "infiltrated" Abu Ghraib."

      "Infiltrated?" If I go for a walkabout in Memphis, have I "infiltrated" it?

      Going for an occasional walkabout in Abu Ghraib is Not the equivalent of losing a thousand fighters a month in bombing raids. It just ain't.

      Delete
  38. So we're looking at peak oil...price.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, it stayed high enough, long enough to put Europe back into deep recession, and slowed growth in China, while forcing the United States to use considerably less, cutting our growth down to minimal.

      That'll knock the price down for awhile. It'll also knock a hole into the fracking, and deep-water plays.

      I would save my "Victory Lap" for about Six Months if I were you.

      Delete
    2. I, also, said that, as the waves got higher, the Eurozone would be the first to go under.

      Delete
    3. Sometimes, this game is just too easy. :)

      Delete
    4. Just like a religious guy - any counterfactual is used of proof of existence.

      Delete
    5. Fine. Oil is an infinite resource on this planet. And, you can drill deep-water wells for $80.00/bbl.

      Enjoy your abundance.

      Delete
  39. Taking a mid day high end luncheon break here at McDonald's where the wi fi is free......

    Thought I'd take the opportunity to throw this one in Ruf's face -

    Fact Checker
    The absurd claim that only Republicans are to blame for cuts to Ebola research

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/fact-checker/wp/2014/10/15/the-absurd-claim-that-only-republicans-are-to-blame-for-cuts-to-ebola-research/

    ReplyDelete
  40. ANOTHER Good News article out of New Hampshire -


    It’s Neck and Neck in the Bellwether State of New Hampshire
    By Matthew Cooper / October 15, 2014 7:08 AM EDT

    http://www.newsweek.com/2014/10/24/its-neck-and-neck-bellwether-state-new-hampshire-277445.html


    Follow The Elephants

    This game is becoming fun !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. People are beginning to see how badly they have been swindled by Obama and Company.

      Delete
  41. The Monopoly Game is in full swing at McDonald's, friends and neighbors and bloggers.

    You are missing out on all the fun !

    ReplyDelete

  42. DEMS LOWEST IN 30 YEARS.......drudge

    Meanwhile -


    SNAP: FIRST LADY DANCES WITH TURNIP.........drudge

    Even Michelle's ballyhooed Healthy Lunch Program is a big flop.

    The kids are going on hunger strikes in the schools all across our great nation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think I'm gonna order another Big Mac.

      Delete
  43. MORE Good News - - - - - Maybe.....

    Cory Gardner pulling away in Colorado
    posted at 3:21 pm on October 15, 2014 by Noah Rothman



    Republicans can be forgiven for growing a bit confident that they will retake the majority in the Senate in the Fall.

    Polls suggest that GOP candidates in states like Montana, West Virginia, South Dakota, Alaska, Arkansas and Louisiana will eventually emerge victorious. Though securing an outright majority may have to wait for at least one runoff race before the GOP can be assured that they will have a majority in both chambers of the 114th Congress.

    But Republicans are starting to open up alternative paths to a simple majority in the Senate. In Iowa and Colorado, two Republican candidates are emerging as contenders. Rep. Cory Gardner (R-CO) is performing perhaps the best of all the marginal GOP Senate candidates in his race to unseat incumbent Sen. Mark Udall (D-CO).

    On Wednesday, Gardner got among the best polling news he has enjoyed of the entire 2014 election season. A CNN/ORC poll released on Wednesday showed Gardner receiving the support of a majority of the Centennial State’s likely voters with 50 percent to 46 percent support for Udall.

    “Hurting Udall is an underwater favorability rating of 45 percent — with 51 percent of those surveyed saying they have an unfavorable opinion of the Democrat,” CNN reported. “Gardner, meanwhile, is viewed favorably by 50 percent of likely voters, with just 42 percent saying their opinion of him is unfavorable.”

    So, Gardner has this race in the bag, right? Not so fast.

    Liberal poll-watchers have been concerned about the quality of polling in the races this cycle, and in this state in particular. Several recent surveys of this race have suggested Udall underperforming among Hispanics, and even losing this key demographic to Gardner. This is giving some political analysts pause, and they have good evidence to back their concerns up.

    In 2010, GOP senatorial nominee Ken Buck appeared to be breaking away in his race against Michael Bennet. Heading into election day, Buck enjoyed a 3 point advantage over Bennett in the Real Clear Politics average of polls with the trend line suggesting the race was his to lose. Bennett, it turned out, emerged victorious.

    Gardner may be a victim of the same phenomenon. This state’s minorities are notoriously difficult to poll in midterm election cycles, and pollsters may not have learned the lessons of 2010.

    That note of caution aside, the electoral wind is unquestionably at Gardner’s back. He may yet prove that Colorado is still a purple state in November, but those who are urging skepticism are smart to do so.......

    http://hotair.com/archives/2014/10/15/cory-gardner-pulling-away-in-colorado/

    ReplyDelete
  44. Big Mac Attack satiated, I am now leaving this most fine Five Star restaurant......belching like Slim Pickens with 'a pouch full of tobacca money and a belly full of beer'.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hEm6LiU3rw

    'The Flim Flam Man' is Quirk's very best favorite movie.....

    ReplyDelete
  45. "The radicalisation of France's Muslim population is a matter of increasing concern, with many inhabitants of the infamous "Sensitive Urban Zones", the violent suburbs of major cities that explode into flaming conflagrations every new years becoming accustomed to violence and civil disobedience."

    http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-London/2014/10/15/Apprentice-Jihadists-French-Park
    THE 'APPRENTICE JIHADIST': ISLAMISTS CONDUCT MILITARY TRAINING IN FRENCH PARK

    ReplyDelete
  46. .

    What is "Occupation"Wed Oct 15, 07:30:00 AM EDT

    aipac is not tax deductible.

    you should learn more before commenting.


    More weasel-wording? I have no idea what you are talking about when you say AIPAC is not tax deductible. It makes no sense given that the subject at hand was 'trips to Israel' and my suggestion that AIPAC all-expense paid tours to Israel for US politicians, Congressmen, and Senators, led by AIPAC members and paid for by AIEF, an AIPAC affiliate and a designated charitable organization, are tax-free for those involved which to my mind is bullshit since AIPAC refuses to register as a foreign agents for Israel.

    Perhaps, it is you who should learn more before commenting.

    Here is an article I have referenced before. Since you don't seem to know, It will explain to you exactly how AIPAC works.

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/09/01/friends-israel

    .

    ReplyDelete
  47. Since I specifically addressed the Mandate of 1922, I could not have been talking about the map of 1920. Both maps appear in the links.

    http://israelipalestinian.procon.org/view.background-resource.php?resourceID=945
    [maps]

    http://www.justicenow4israel.com/mandatemap.html
    [maps]


    Whereas the Principal Allied Powers have also agreed that the Mandatory should be responsible for putting into effect the declaration originally made on November 2nd, 1917, by the Government of His Britannic Majesty, and adopted by the said Powers, in favor of the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people...

    ARTICLE 4. An appropriate Jewish agency shall be recognised as a public body for the purpose of advising and co­operating with the Administration of Palestine in such economic, social and other matters as may affect the establishment of the Jewish national home and the interests of the Jewish population in Palestine...

    ARTICLE 6. The Administration of Palestine, while ensuring that the rights and position of other sections of the population are not prejudiced, shall facilitate Jewish immigration under suitable conditions and shall encourage, in co­operation with the Jewish agency referred to in Article 4, close settlement by Jews on the land, including State lands and waste lands not required for public purposes.

    ARTICLE 7. The Administration of Palestine shall be responsible for enacting a nationality law. There shall be included in this law provisions framed so as to facilitate the acquisition of Palestinian citizenship by Jews who take up their permanent residence in Palestine.






    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There were not 89 nations in the League of Nations. Although the Golan was given to the Zionists in 1920, the British again had a change of mind and gave this territory to the French as shown on the map of 1922. What do these facts tell me? People neither read the articles nor look at the maps before authoritatively stating opinions. That is why it is a waste of time to spend much time on the issue.

      Delete
    2. .

      None of this has anything to do with the fact that the Mandate of 1922 had nothing to with creating a state for the Jews. Rather it had everything to do with facilitating the immigration of Jews into Palestine an entity that was expected to become a single state with autonomous regions for Jews and non-Jews, ultimately Israel and Palestine.

      The information is readily available. Look it up or don't.

      .

      Delete
  48. Ash,

    Had you bothered yourself with reading an opinion of mine given earlier on this thread about American foreign policy as it relates to Iraq, you would not be asking questions of me that were answered therein. This is why it is a waste of time to spend much time on the issue.

    ReplyDelete
  49. http://www.cufi.org/site/PageServer
    (largest pro-Israel group in the U.S.)

    ReplyDelete