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Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Olbermann for Senate? Just what the nation needs

This should do wonders for a more contemplative political atmosphere:

Liberals trying to draft Keith Olbermann for Joe Lieberman's Senate seat
By Sean J. Miller 01/24/11 01:12 PM ET
Liberals want Keith Olbermann to run for retiring Connecticut Sen. Joe Lieberman's (I-Conn.) seat. 
The ploy to coax the former MSNBC host into the Democratic Senate primary was hatched by activists attending a conference in Pennsylvania over the weekend.  


18 comments:

  1. I couldn't listen to the whole rant. I had to repudiate Olbermann.

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  2. Why not? Franken's in there. Why not have an all-clown Democratic caucus?

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  3. I was thinking the same thing. Franken and Olbermann. What a circus!

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  4. How many Olbermanns can you fit in a volkswagon?

    Oh wait, wrong post.

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  5. I just want the teleprompter to go out so I can see Obama's "Deer in headlights" face.

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  6. How does anyone take this guy seriously?

    The Republicans were idiots agreeing to this fuzzier and cuddlier SOU.

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  7. Obama is taking credit for the victory in Iraq? Wasn't it due to the strategy he said would fail?

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  8. Obama is practicing stand-up comedy.

    we should give them a government that’s more competent and more efficient.

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  9. What kind of name recognition does he have, in Connecticut?

    Who is going to be on the other side?

    A moderate Republican or a clone of Ms Sharon Angle or Ms Christine O'Donnell?

    It is Connecticut, after all.

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  10. The Senators and Congressmen should be seated by State, not Party.

    That they are seated by Party and not State, a sign of the dysfunction that permeates the Federal establishment.

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  11. To credit Obama with the stock market recovery in 2011 is no more laughable than was blaming him for the crash, back in 2009.
    Less so, really.

    That was the point I was trying to make.

    Poorly it seems.

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  12. Security forces, which normally prevent major public displays of dissent, initially struggled to suppress the demonstrations, allowing them to swell.

    But early Wednesday morning, firing rubber bullets, tear gas and concussion grenades, the police finally drove groups of demonstrators from the square, as the sit-in was transformed into a spreading battle involving thousands of people and little restraint. Plainclothes officers beat several demonstrators, and protesters flipped over a police car and set it on fire.

    Protests also flared in Alexandria, Suez, Mansura and Beni Suef. There were reports of three deaths and many injuries around the country.

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  13. Suleiman announced that Mikati, a 55-year-old Sunni businessman from Tripoli who served as interim prime minister for three months in the past, will be forming the new government of Lebanon. The announcement followed Hezbollah's success in rallying 68 parliamentarians in favor of Mikati, against only 60 who supported the rival March 14 camp - which supported outgoing Prime Minister Saad Hariri.

    Yesterday's protests in Lebanon were mostly a release of pent up anger, but it soon became apparent to the Lebanese Sunnis and Christians that the Shi'ite Muslim organization had managed to takeover the country legally.

    The thousands who took to the streets burned pictures of Mikati, threw stones at army and police officers and attacked Al Jazeera crews, as they consider the TV station a proxy of Hezbollah.

    For his part, Mikati said he would begin work on forming a government tomorrow. Even though he has not been officially appointed yet, Mikati is expected to succeed in putting together a government with relative ease considering the majority he is guaranteed in the parliament.

    Suleiman's announcement came on a particularly difficult day in Lebanon, with tens of thousands of March 14 alliance supporters taking to the streets of Beirut and Tripoli to protest what they described as the Iranian and Syrian takeover of Lebanon.

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  14. .

    That was the point I was trying to make.

    Poorly it seems.


    Your 'irony font' does need some work rat.

    It sometimes seems, as Trish has pointed out, that you take both sides of an argument and then call yourself a prophet. It's not a wise decision to force us to think too hard here.

    :)

    .

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  15. .

    By the way, what's the weather like when you're out there with the horses?

    .

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  16. I didn't watch the SOTU, but the transcript read okay.

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  17. It is usually nice, Q.

    It hardly ever rains, here.
    In the summer the operation moves higher into the mountains, or they don't go, as the temperatures get to hot in the desert.

    But from mid-October to mid-May, the weather is just delightful. Like today, low 70's for the high, low 50's at dawn, sunny all day.

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