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Monday, November 14, 2011

Cain on Libya: How do you rate this response?



I saw some press reports critisizing Cain for this response to a question about Libya. It is time to go home baby. Thanks for your service, it’s been fun. Let’s get together for lunch some time.

Can you imagine the political commercials using this tape. It does make one harken to the good old days when the level of intelligence of the Ameriocan public was far more elevated:



…and can you believe this one?




…and of course we have the genius that leads us today.





86 comments:

  1. I don't think that was so awful. After a slow start admittedly, he concentrated on the questions about the makeup of the opposition. What's wrong with this?

    There was fighting in Libya today between the factions, probably will continue.

    b

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  2. I posted this earlier. I took it down intending to let the previous thread run out . Q posted this as well. As Rufus commented, it is rough to watch. Cain could not find Libya on an unmarked map, but he is not alone. I believe Cain was caught wondering about Libya and Liberia and was clearly confused. I had a girl who worked for me, damn good looking girl, great salesperson, but she just could not get the difference between Austria and Australia. I think it may have been Bush that tripped up on Slovenia and Slovakia.

    We are childish in our expectations about what it takes to be a president. Obama had his 57 state moment and as Commander in Chief could not recognize the word corpsman; he called them corpse-men reading his teleprompter.

    Cain could not be a worse president than either Bush or Obama, I would hope, but it is not a binary choice, yet. This is the NFL. Sorry, there are better quarter-backs on the bench.

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  3. To put this into context, I added several other videos to the post.

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  4. I'm not sure it wouldn't take him quite a while to find it on a "marked" map.

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  5. America's Best Hope for the future is voting in a President with Strong Majorities in BOTH the House of Representatives and Senate. Herman Cain cannot do that.

    We do not need more games using filibusters and other Senate delaying tactics.

    When there is a FIRE, obstructive argumentative firemen is the last thing needed. Cain to his credit does not appear to be that.
    Continued divided government is dangerous and destructive and something we cannot afford.

    The Tea Party is a Sabotage Party.
    We need Solutions not spoilers. Only Romney can fill that role.

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  6. Johnson was obviously a kiddie porn fan.

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  7. Then there was This Gem

    Love one another, or die.


    b

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  8. Cain is falling rapidly here and has begun his second and final descent. Romneys support is very very soft. Cain was slipping even before Politico accelerated the process. His first bump had been from about three or four points up to about eight to ten. It got him notice while sparing him the searing inspection that goes with a top tier candidate. This time around, people really focused in, and discovered there was not much to see after all. About 80-percent of potential GOP voters have made no decision and are barely paying attention at this point. Gingrich seems to be leading all the others practically everywhere.

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  9. I am so hoping that nobody wins.

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  10. It's probably Gingrich 25%, Romney 25%, and Obama 50%. Ah, what the hell. The final results would end up about the same. Not a big dif.

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  11. Deuce: Cain could not be a worse president than either Bush or Obama, I would hope, but it is not a binary choice, yet. This is the NFL. Sorry, there are better quarter-backs on the bench.

    Presidential campaigns are so filthy these days, and you know Obama is going to spend a billion dollars slinging mud in 2012. The smart ones know better than to get in. They stay on the bench, and you get your Palins and Perrys and Quayles, oh my.

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  12. Is it so hard to find a moral, intelligent, principled man* who can lead?

    Apparently.

    ____________________________________
    *used in gender neutral context

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  13. What do Republicans think? Do they?

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  14. I'm a Republican. I think a lot of Republicans think somewhat the same as I.

    If we think at all :)

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  15. Mitt Romney would have said, "Republicans are people, too."

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  16. The echo chamber of Hannity, Rush, Levin and Beck has already done severe damage to the Republican Party’s chances of winning against Obama. They have promoted fringe candidates and trashed those candidates that can win. A cynic could observe that the reelection of Obama would be very good for their businesses. The self-righteous gilded microphones and their counterparts in the leftist media have essentially convinced good, competent potential candidates to not even consider the personal cruelty and degradation necessary to run the gauntlet to become president. The process is a masochistic freak show. Can you imagine Boeing, IBM or Apple using such a system to select their leader. Their has been an usurpation of power in the asylum.

    -----------

    On another unrelated matter, I tell you who is really getting on my nerves, that old leather-chapped asshole in that UnitedHealthcare commercial, the grizzled leather faced fool that has been riding "flat out his whole life”, who was miraculously saved by the big insurance company from letting him mix the wrong drugs. You know, the guy that wants to “die exhausted”.

    I agree, I want him dead as well.

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  17. He looks to me like he'll die from one dick too many up his ass.

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  18. I don't think Motorcycle-jocks that "ride flat-out their whole lives" very often die "exhausted at 91," or whatever.

    Seems to me the "late teens," or "early twenties" seems to be about it.

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  19. You want a Real thrill? Go online to United Healthcare, and put "motorcycle racer" (flat-out, or otherwise) down for occupation, then wait to see what pops up for "Annual Premium."

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  20. Golly ...

    Who are the Republicans?

    Certainty not the Tea Partiers, as they are Tea Partier, not Republicans.

    No, the Governor of Texas is a Republican, for the past twenty some years. Perry and Bush, both.

    Exemplary Republicans.

    Newt, a life long Federal Socialist and Republican.

    Mr Cain, he's on one heck of a book selling tour.

    Obama was said to be vulnerable, right here at the EB, back in 2008. To bad no Republicans are as capable as Obama at keepingtheir eyes on the prize.

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  21. I mean, really, Newt got that $300,000, for giving historical advise to Freddie Mac.

    A life long Federal Socialist...

    ... and an unregistered lobbyist.

    Read More

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  22. Obaby is starting to get some good advice. Releasing that oil from the Strategic Reserve seems to have averted an almost sure-fire Recession.

    And, sure enough, Libya is coming back online (4 or 500,000 bpd, it looks like.) The last couple of months of Economic "numbers" haven't been too awfully bad - at least not as bad as they were before the drawdown.

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  23. While, on Obama's Foreign Policy, the GOP contenders are left mumbling ...

    Me too, I guess

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  24. I admit that $300,000 looks a little suspect, but until someone comes forward and proves (or at least claims, otherwise) his explanation will have to stand.

    I just wonder if that moolah couldn't more likely be "hush" money than "lobbying" money?

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  25. Former Freddie Mac officials familiar with the consulting work Gingrich was hired to perform for the company in 2006 tell a different story. They say the former House speaker was asked to build bridges to Capitol Hill Republicans and develop an argument on behalf of the company’s public-private structure that would resonate with conservatives seeking to dismantle it.

    If Gingrich concluded that the company’s business model was at risk and that the housing market was a “bubble,” as he said during the debate,

    he didn’t share those concerns with Richard Syron, Freddie Mac’s chief executive officer at the time, a person familiar with the company’s internal discussions said.

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  26. They say the former House speaker was asked to build bridges to Capitol Hill Republicans and develop an argument on behalf of the company’s

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  27. Newt is a creature of the DC morass.

    There'd be no change in course or speed, of the Federal Leviathan, if he were to be elected to the Presidency.

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  28. Both Newt and Mrs Bachmann, decrying Federal expenditures, while cashing their Federal welfare checks.

    The hypocrisy is beyond the pale.

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  29. While those that did not report the sexual predator to the police are discovering that "Failing to Report" knowledge of a sex crime is a really serious matter.

    The danger to the community is always considered paramount, rather than the personal motives of those that would prefer to be silent.

    Those scum that prefer to dwell in their own hedonistic silence rather than fulfilling their responsibilities to protect their community.

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  30. No, Rat, there's not much difference between them. Minor tweaks, here and there.

    I kind of like Newt on unemployment/retraining, and energy.

    Obama better on Healthcare.

    Mitt would be a reasonably good administrator, and has a bias toward compromise.

    I don't think I'll be moving to Canada in whatever case.

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  31. Guess one of the three of them were toting "something" that looked like a weapon, no?


    France's consul to the Gaza Strip, his wife and 13-year-old daughter were injured during an Israeli air strike on Sunday night, French Foreign Ministry spokesman Bernard Valero said on Tuesday.

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  32. I've got the course to the beach plotted and ready, rufus.

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  33. It's all about America.

    North, South or Central.

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  34. Guaymas, Mexico

    An eight hour drive from Phoenix.
    Daily commercial flights.

    Great diving and fishing.

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  35. Less Pirates in Gulf Shores, "Maybe." :)

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  36. More hurricanes, that's fer sure.

    Higher cost of living.

    Pirates?

    They're on the Potomac River.

    Not so much the Sea of Cortez.
    There is no US beach, there.
    The smuggling routes, further east along the secondary hard roads.

    The main highway south from the US frontier to Hermosillo and Guaymas, first class and well patrolled by Federale law enforcement.

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  37. “The raid, which killed one policeman and wounded four others after Palestinian militants from the coastal territory fired a rocket into southern Israel, is likely to strain already difficult relations between Paris and Jerusalem.

    French President Nicolas Sarkozy has written to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to reaffirm friendship despite what he refers to as their "differing views on the Middle East".

    Sarkozy's comments, in a condolence message to Netanyahu for the death of his father-in-law, seemed to make an effort to try to clear the air a week after a reported gaffe this month at the G20 summit in Cannes, when he was overheard telling U.S. President Barack Obama he thought Netanyahu was "a liar".



    Right…”Gaffe” hardly captures the enormity of Sarkozy’s idiocy, but we are talking about slandering the leader of the Zionist entity so, to the EU and 1600, no big deal.

    Maybe the French consul should ask his buds to find a launch site just a bit further down the road, next time…poor baby…

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  38. By Richard Cohen


    Say what you will about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, others have said far worse.

    Yitzhak Shamir, a former prime minister, once said that Netanyahu is “not a very trustworthy man.”

    He went on to call him “too egotistical,” “not very popular” and to observe that “people don’t like him.” Then, to state the very obvious, Shamir said, “I don’t like him.”
    ...
    But when it comes to Netanyahu, Obama is part of a throng of people — Israelis much more than Americans — who finds the man overbearing and duplicitous. Now we know Sarkozy feels the same way. ...

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  39. So, we know from an Israeli Premier, Yitzhak Shamir, that Bibi is “not a very trustworthy man.”

    If Bibi speaks for Israel, well ...

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  40. Yep, just the sort of thing one would expect to happen in any neighborhood in Tel Aviv

    Man 'murdered three daughters and wife in honour killing before saying said he'd do the same again 100 times'

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  41. Imagine that! A politician unliked. What will they think of next?

    Last time I checked, liked or no, Netanyahu was elected to office. Worse yet, he is adored by the American public. That is far more than one can say of the leaders of Egypt, Libya or Syria. They don't suffer the stigma of being Jews, I will agree, which for some is good enough.

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  42. Netanyahu must be terribly unpopular in Israel. This is only the second time he has been elected to prime minister, isn't it?

    He's popular with me, I've always liked the guy.


    b

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  43. That's the first time I've seen that Cain video. Painful. You're right. He's done.

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  44. A federal judge has ruled that former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice must testify in person if certain evidence is introduced at the trial of a former CIA officer accused of leaking classified information, Politico reported Tuesday.

    Ex-CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling is charged with violating the Espionage Act by providing classified information to The New York Times about a US plan to provide Iran with erroneous nuclear designs.

    ...

    Sterling's trial is not expected to begin for several months. Rice did not return calls from Politico to comment on Brinkema's order.

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  45. Everyone is wondering about the next disaster to befall Europe. Italy is one focus; Spain is also a possibility.

    ...

    Now we are seeing this elite struggle to preserve its vision. When Papandreou called for a referendum on austerity, the European elite put tremendous pressure on him to abandon his initiative.

    ...

    And here we come to the real European crisis. Given the nature of the crisis, which we have seen play out in Greece, the European elite can save the European concept and their own interests only by transferring the cost to the broader public, and not simply among debtors.


    Beyond Finance

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  46. Well, at least as far as Bibi is concerned, we've moved from him being the "Leader of Zionism" to just another foreign politico, one adored by Americans.

    At least by those in Congress, which is none to popular, with "Real Americans".
    No, not that popular at all.

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  47. Cain has said repeatedly that he has not engaged in any in­appropriate behavior and that the sexual harassment allegations against him are “baseless.” Lin Wood, Cain’s attorney, questioned Zuckerman’s credibility and argued that even if everything Zuckerman said is true, none of it refutes Cain’s recollection.

    “Herman Cain, over the course of the last 15 years, has probably had dinners and functions with thousands of people,” Wood said. “And while it may be memorable in the minds of some who met him when he was president of the National Restaurant Association, in the real world it may not have been memorable to Mr. Cain.”

    The day ended on a more positive note for Cain as a long-awaited interview with his wife aired on Fox News. Gloria Cain, who has previously steered clear of the spotlight, strongly vouched for him, saying: “I’m thinking he would have to have a split personality to do the things that were said.”

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  48. Anonymous Bob said... Netanyahu must be terribly unpopular in Israel.

    Naw. Hitler built housing for Germans in occupied France, Czechloslovia, Denmark, Poland, etc., and it was really popular with the German people.

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  49. Elliott Abrams, a Middle East expert in the George W. Bush administration: “...by that comment -- and especially as it was made in private and can be interpreted as his actual view -- President Obama has joined the chorus of assaults on the Jewish State.”

    So attacking Netanyahu personally is the same thing as attacking the Jewish state.

    Attacking the policies of the Jewish state is the same as attacking Jews.

    See how it works?

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  50. Allen Please:

    Last time I checked, liked or no, Netanyahu was elected to office. Worse yet, he is adored by the American public.

    I would bet money that there are not one in four Americans that could get this question correct:

    “What is a Netanyahu?”

    A. An internet search engine by Yahoo.

    B. The second most common girl’s name in Zimbabwe.

    C. The smallest Hawaiian Island.

    D. The present PM in Israel.

    E. None of the above.

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  51. When one of the top contenders for the nomination to be the Standard Bearer of the Republican Party in the 2012 election does not know where US policy on Libya is, well ...

    It is not to hard to think Deuce is closer to the truth than is allen.
    At least as to the depth of geo-political knowledge of "Real" Americans is concerned.
    Especially those that believe the GOP and Democrats represent a real binary choice.

    That it "makes a difference" which of the Federal Socialists is the occupant of the Oval Office.

    There are not 400,000 protestors in the streets of United States.
    Not even close.

    Utilizing that Israel to US math ratio, well, we'd need to have 50 times 400,000, to equal the level of social dissatisfaction with the status que.

    20 million marchers, would be in the streets of the US before Mr Obama would be at a level "equivalent" to the adoration bestowed upon Bibi, in Israel.

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  52. Someone's tail is trying to get the dog wagging.

    To quell domestic dissatisfaction.

    By fostering a disturbance in the Sea of Tranquility.

    Someone that Yitzhak Shamir said was not a trustworthy person.

    An opinion echoed by France's President Nicolas Sarkozy.

    If that makes Israel untrustworthy, well, who's to know?

    Does Bibi really represent the very soul of Israel?

    Are his character flaws Israels'?

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  53. I just read an autobiography of Golda Meyerson aka Golda Meier, once PM of Israel for a time. Born an America she taught in Chicago schools before turning full time to Jewish affairs. In 1947/48 she was sent by her Jewish compatriots to come back to the USA on a fund raising effort to get money for weapons. She raised $50,000,000 in a short time here, which helped immensely arming the Israelis at that time. It is a good thing for Israel to have a PM who speaks English fluently and has some connection to here. Bibi was schooled here, I believe.


    b

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  54. Or is Bibi now,
    because he represents the government of Israel, to be considered
    "Flawless"?

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  55. Or should the flaws be ignored?

    Or just go, unspoken?

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  56. We should all be thankful that France's President Nicolas Sarkozy was honest and forthright with President Obama.

    That he was providing the US with unvarnished analysis of the man, without the veneer of political correctness, a very good thing.

    It speaks well of the US relationship now has with the government of France, especially after the "Freedom Fries" era.

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  57. Most politicians are considered "smart" when they can merely avoid their own stupidity. I feel their pain. Elsewhere, I can’t get enough of pink grapefruit and arugula lately.

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  58. It wasn’t Herman Cain.

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  59. The Butcher-Frazier Bout

    A scramble of a life, it turned out, always looking for that one clear shot at security. But as the Butcher says, more than once: “You can’t change destiny.”

    Three years ago, the Butcher attended his 45th high school reunion in Council Bluffs. Who was there but Toddy Ann Leytham, the only one to be carried out after the Frazier-Stander fight, widowed and still harboring a crush for Ronnie. They married a year later.

    Destiny for the Butcher at 67 means driving a school bus, helping out disadvantaged kids and living in a cozy house with Toddy, his biggest fan. She wears a T-shirt that bears his younger image and the words “My Hero.” She makes reprints of boxing posters to have him sign and sell. She hangs photographs from his boxing years, including a particularly gory one from the fight with Frazier, always with him.

    People in Omaha have not forgotten that fight. And when they see Frazier’s bloodied victim around town, they call out his name. Hey, Butcher, they say. Hey, Champ.

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  60. The campaign was enormously lopsided. Xcel dumped nearly $1 million into a vote ‘no’ campaign, outspending local clean energy supporters by a 10-to-1 margin and spending nearly $77 for each no vote. On the flip side, nearly every local business or newspaper endorsement (and nearly 1000 individual citizen endorsements) supported a ‘yes’ vote. Despite the financial disadvantage, the local grassroots groups won, though their margin of victory was less than 3%.

    The victory margin was small, but the clean energy and economic opportunity is enormous. According to a citizen-led and peer-reviewed study, the city could increase renewable energy production by 40 percent from multiple, local sources without increasing rates. In contrast to the $100 million in revenue sent to Xcel under the current arrangement, the economic value of local energy production and ownership could multiply within the city’s economy to as much as $350 million a year, according to research by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

    If the city uses its new authority to become a utility, future generations may look back at 11/1/11 as the shot heard round the world – a shot fired for clean, local energy – and ask why more Americans didn’t “go Boulder” sooner.


    Boulder tells Xcell to take a hike

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  61. Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) has chosen community solar garden developer the Clean Energy Collective to build and operate a 500 kW community-owned solar facility within the municipally-owned utility's service territory. This is a boon to Colorado's clean energy economy and to the growth of CSU's renewable energy portfolio. It also is significant for Colorado Springs residents because the CEC's admired model allows members to own their panels in locally-sited solar arrays.

    A Colorado company, the CEC was the first in the nation to build and operate a community-owned renewable energy facility.

    Through the CEC, any CSU residential or educational customer-such as property renters, poorly-sited . . . . . .



    Solar Gardens - Cool Deal

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  62. So if the Israelis should hit the Iranians, the Iranians move to close the Gulf shipping route and the US Navy and Air Force is really all that can try to keep it open. So should we and the Saudis try to reopen it, and then what happens, Mr. Cain?

    b

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  63. Never ask a question you don't have the answer to yourself.

    b

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  64. Blasting the congressional “creatures of Washington” for being overpaid and detached from the struggles of the people outside the Beltway, Texas Gov. and GOP presidential hopeful Rick Perry vowed Tuesday to eliminate federal agencies, set term limits for federal judges and push for a part-time Congress where both members’ pay and office budgets are sliced in half.

    The three-term governor, speaking on a campaign swing in Bettendorf, Iowa, said he would lead by example by cutting his salary as president until the federal budget is balanced, and said that lawmakers who use information to profit from stock trades should go to jail — in what appeared to be a clear reference to recent news reports alleging insider trading involving House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.



    A part time Cpngress, I really like the sounds of that.

    b

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  65. Anonymous Bob: What Are The Chinese Up To Now?

    That's a mockup of downtown Moscow, Idaho so they know where to go when they come to collect their vig.

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  66. 8. Eggplant: The thought also occurs to me that if Iran wanted to push the house-of-cards over with a nuclear event, the next two weeks are about the right time to do it.

    The oil market is pricing the Iran thing in, over just 28 trading days it's up 30%, $74 to $99. Last time that happened, Saddam annexed Kuwait.

    ReplyDelete
  67. (Reuters) - The U.S. government is not taking advantage of an enforcement tool that could potentially hold top Wall Street figures accountable for their role in the recent financial crisis, despite its prior success.

    Broker-dealers, investment advisers, and others regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission are required to supervise their representatives. If a trader engages in misconduct, the SEC can sue the management with "failure to supervise."

    But in some of the biggest cases the SEC has brought in recent months -- against units of JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, and Citigroup -- the agency has sued only low-level bankers.

    Public anger following the U.S. government bailout of major banks in 2008 is fueling such disparate movements as Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party, but government lawyers say they are bringing cases based on the evidence they have. Some experts argue the agency could be doing more.

    "There is an affirmative obligation of supervisors to supervise their subordinates, but not a hint of that here," Duke University law professor James Cox said, referring to the

    Save the Top 0.01%

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  68. 13. gs:

    There are legitimate concerns about the rapid-fire trading that has been enabled by computer technology: for example, instabilities which snowball into market meltdowns can arise. But I have yet to hear a politician who sounds like they are thinking in depth about the issue.

    The algorithms don't even care what the stock is, it could be Boeing, it could be www.we-deliver-condoms. com, they just care what the stock did in the last few milliseconds, and they calculate what it's going to do in the next few milliseconds. Fully 99% of these high-frequency trades are canceled, on the same scale of time. This is now 85% of the volume of the stock market. The only losers are the day traders trying to kick it old school. Buy-and-hold funds don't care. Boeing and Microsoft will still be there in the morning when it's all over. This is how you solve it: Force cancel orders to take full second (1000 milliseconds, an eternity for a computer) before they go through. The Occupy Wall Street people have it all wrong, they need to be camping out in the NYSE server farm.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Actually, the International Oil Markets, as exemplified by Light Louisiana Sweet are within pennies of where they were a month ago.

    The movement in WTI is just a function of a lot of the Bakken Crude being sent West, South, and East by Train to escape the bottleneck at Cushing.

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  70. desert rat said...
    Or is Bibi now,
    because he represents the government of Israel, to be considered
    "Flawless"?

    Tue Nov 15, 03:32:00 PM EST



    Hardly. But being a Jew does not make him Lucifer either, nor the Zןםמןדא קמאןאט Hקךך

    Like it or not guys, scientific polling shows that the American public likes the guy. Does that make him less a liar than say, oh, Sarkozy or Obama? No. But in politics perception becomes reality. Remember, that is how we have gotten the last four losers. I'd bet his approvals among Americans are better than Obama's and off the charts compared to the petite canard.

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  71. DR wrote...
    Utilizing that Israel to US math ratio, well, we'd need to have 50 times 400,000, to equal the level of social dissatisfaction with the status que.


    DR, you just don't grasp how well you make my point. If and when the Israeli public tires sufficiently, Mr. Netanyahu will be replaced peacefully. Indeed, unless you have something I don't know, there has been no violence in Israel during the marches. That speaks volumes of the differences in civilization (if one may say that of a Muslim country beyond the 14th century.

    By the way, when was the last march in Israel? You needn't hurry, the "marchers" haven't been :-)

    To clarify, when Mr. Netanyahu is relieved of duty he will not be beaten, sodomized and summarily executed as was the Libyan Duck of Death. If you haven't heard of the Colonel's sodomization, check it out...Amalek written all over it.

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  72. DR,

    We do share a common passion, I think. If they come within two days travel, don't miss them. I guarantee, you have never seen anything like them. I'd wager the best horsemen/women anywhere in the world.
    Cavalia

    ReplyDelete
  73. Allen: To clarify, when Mr. Netanyahu is relieved of duty he will not be beaten, sodomized and summarily executed as was the Libyan Duck of Death.

    Muslim-on-Muslim violence bores the heck out of me. That's why I yawn whenever Obama does whack-a-mullah with a drone.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Newly appointed Greek Prime Minister Lucas Papademos on Monday told Parliament that the debt-ridden nation had no choice but to remain in the eurozone.

    Papademos also said the budget deficit for this year would exceed the targeted 9 percent of gross domestic product.


    They had to bolshevik their way into the Eurozone with a 3 percent GDP deficit, which they never had, except with some Enron style accounting.

    ReplyDelete
  75. Qaddafi got poked in the back side?

    jeez, was he dead or alive?



    b

    ReplyDelete
  76. T said...
    Muslim-on-Muslim violence bores the heck out of me. That's why I yawn whenever Obama does whack-a-mullah with a drone.

    Tue Nov 15, 10:30:00 PM EST



    Nothing bores you; so, in the words of Christopher Walken, "Oh Paaaleeese!"

    ReplyDelete