“This site is dedicated to preying on peoples vanity, ignorance, or loneliness, gaining their trust and betraying them without remorse.”

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Good old Abraham and his gift to the World

127 comments:

  1. Is it any wonder the Middle Eat is the Middle East?

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    1. No, no surprise or wonder because even 3,000 years ago the "Arabs" were known as troublesome "asses":

      And he will be a wild man; his hand will be against every man, and every man's hand against him; and he shall dwell in the presence of all his brethren.Gen 1:6

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    2. correction; Gen 16:12

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  2. What can one say to that video but Deuce to the Dunce Seat?

    Who put Ash there once, for dissing the Catholic hierarchy and homosexuality among priests, if I recall.

    That is so ill informed, so unread, so thoughtless, that you ought to be banned from your own site.

    I'm going to bed. WiO can take you on, if he wants to get down into that muck.



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    1. No time for such misinterpretation.

      Hard enough arguing what the Torah wrote about with those that have kindness in their hearts (Christians).

      The one thing I agree with?

      Torah is not for common discussion.

      If you notice, the narrator blames Abraham for creating Christianity and Islam...

      Doesnt even MENTION Judaism.

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  3. I can't view the video at work.
    What is the boiled down version?

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    1. The narrator uses the most inflammatory terms and modern social consciousness to interpret the story of Abraham.

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    2. .

      I agree with anon in a sense. The Bible was written a few thousand years ago. Different place, different time.

      I noticed that Deuce's little video didn't have any reference as to who put it together. Yet, from the first couple of sentences it is obvious that it is merely an Atheist screed. As is noted below, it talks of Abraham and the Bible but doesn't even mention the Jews. Instead it jumps past them so as to condemn Christians and Muslims ignoring obvious differences among the faiths.

      .

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    3. Quirk, WIO stated:

      "If you notice, the narrator blames Abraham for creating Christianity and Islam...

      Doesnt even MENTION Judaism."

      at: wio Tue Jan 15, 10:57:00 AM EST

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    4. .

      Apologies to Wio if I mispoke. However, how am I to know they are not the same? I seem to recall WiO has used Anonymous in the past. Or perhaps, that Anonymous was that dick Bob who tries to mimic WiO in all respects. You know, Bob, who uses various aliases so that he has at least one person here who agrees with him.

      What number on the DRR list was multiple personality disorder?

      .

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    5. .

      As for your original point, Anon, I said:

      As is noted below, it talks of Abraham and the Bible but doesn't even mention the Jews.

      Is your objection that I didn't specifically mention WiO by name or that I mistakenly referenced a post below rather than above?

      If the first, I note that you nit pick just as the rat does. If the latter, I would have to say you suffer from an anal fixation worse than even those who are constantly correcting spelling errors.

      .



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    6. Thanks for the Hat Tip Quirk.

      No clue who posts what calling themselves whatever...

      I have noticed that there are BUNCH on names I do not know...

      Doris/DDR being 2 of them.

      Doug I know, but I don't know who "dougman" and doug2 are...

      As for anon, I swear some seem familiar, some not, some seem to mimic me on purpose...

      And yes from time to time I do use anon, mostly when I am trying NOT to cause issues. Since so many dont read what I say as WiO

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    7. I read what you write. Your perspective is interesting to me.

      Delete
  4. Can you calculate the amount of death and damage caused by the enshrinement of such men (and it is a man problem)? You can’t because it is ongoing. Head hackers, penis hackers, clitoris hackers all having at it with each other. All in the name of he who should not be mentioned, because it upsets him.

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    1. With or without religion, man does a very nice job of killing one another.

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    2. .

      Deuce, in one sentence, tries to make the distinction between 'man' and religion and to also conflate them if it suits his purpose.

      Ghandi once made the point (paraphrased) that, "Christianity is a fine religion. I like it very much. Christians should try it some time."

      You are right. It is a man problem; but by blaming religion for it you merely provide an excuse, the same excuse many of them use, for their cruel and misogynistic actions. It is the people that commit the crimes not the gods that they follow.

      Anon makes a great point. During the last century count up the amount of people killed in the name of religion. Then start counting the miilions killed by the secularists who opposed any kind of religion; Hitler (12 million), Stalin (20 million), Mao (50-80 million), Leopold II (8 million in the Congo), Enver (1.2 million Armenians), and I could go on, Cambodia, Biafra, Ethiopia, Rwanda,...

      If man doesn't have an excuse to rationalize his actions, he will invent one.

      .

      .

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    3. "Deuce, in one sentence, tries to make the distinction between 'man' and religion and to also conflate them if it suits his purpose. "

      Sometimes he inflates his special purpose beneath his suit to make the distinction between 'man' and 'woman'

      ...or is that a slip back into fart joke territory?

      Delete
  5. Ah, the "most cunning of the Garden" or something like that.
    Interesting that Jesus told his followers to be cunning.
    But can you calculate the billions, or possibly trillions of people that would be inhabiting the earth if not for all the death that has occured since?
    Who do we thank for the thinning of the herd with disease, disaster, etc.?

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  6. Over-population. That, in my opinion would be a a more pressing man problem.

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  7. I'm still a thread behind. I've been watching this Mali thing unfold over the last few weeks, not closely mind you, but paying attention and I kept thinking of the folks here. All you guys who bemoan the enabling of the Muslims in the Middle East, the MB in Egypt, the Sunni in Iraq, the folk in Libya and praise the secular strongman that ruled before (I guess the lesser evil) but in Mali we've got radical headchopping stern Sharia law rebels poised to take over the country and the hand wringing starts over the French running a few bombing runs with American (and Canadian) support lurking far far in the background. It looks like these fascist Muslims are going to rule Mali unless...

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    1. You are right Ash, but the men that were capable of keeping the lid on have been removed.

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    2. .

      I'm still a thread behind.

      In more ways than one, TaterBoy.

      :)

      .

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  8. All this time it was the weapons that the libyans liberated from Colonel Q's stockpiles that were what was going to Syria. Now, it is weaponry the US, Brits, Italians and French suppplied the rebels.

    I just wish the anti-US story tellers would get on the same page

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    1. We also created the bogeyman to rally the jihadis against. Wait till the Taliban get the US eapons that we will leave behind in Afghanistan.

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    2. .

      I just wish the anti-US story tellers would get on the same page

      Who says it has to be one or the other. It could be both.

      Besides, it is probably irrelevant. Take a look at the following map of the ME and Northern Africa. Almost every country (maybe all of them, as many of us haven't even heard of some of the smaller ones in the South) are currently involved in conflict to one degree or another.

      Politics in Northern Africa and the ME

      Count the countries.

      Would anyone argue we should start wars in all of them?

      Could we if we wanted to?

      Could we even afford to attack them all with drones as in Yemen or Libya?

      There will always be weapons available to these guys whether they are picked up on the battlefield, looted from stores, sold by arms merchants, or donated by do-gooders.

      .

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  9. While I would say there is no major US 'National Iiknterest' in Mali.

    The aerial attacks will not stop the assualt on the Mali capital.

    Airstrikes are over rated, strategicly, by civilians and Air Forces around the whirled.

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    Replies
    1. Where's 'Spell Check Boy'?

      'Interest'

      Delete
    2. How do you know it' a "boy"?

      It could be a girl...

      It could be a transgendered person....

      It could even have been you, whatever you are...

      You have heard of "false flag" operations?

      Maybe if you ever served our nation via the armed forces the thought could have crossed your mind.

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    3. Trust me desert rat, people of all genders find you repulsive and a bad speller...

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    4. Trust me also that Israel will settle all the ME we want and the leftovers will be made into glass so we can park our cars.

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    5. Trust you?

      Not today.

      As to Spell Check Boy...
      Boy is a term of servatude, which fits te abob profile

      But you are doing betterr, at you're polite

      Delete
    6. That would be

      'Anon's profile'

      Touch typing on this phone, not a easy deal

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. .

      The guy is blowing smoke out his ass. As former ambassador to Mali, he is struggling to find someone who will help the government of Mali; France, the U.S., Algeria, Morocco, Mauratania, a coalition of states...

      Unlike Deuce, I stopped reading when I heard the guy say Algeria has a 'moral obligation' to intervene.

      .

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    2. So, just let the head chopping radical Sharia folk seize power?

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    3. Saddam, Mubarak, Ghaddafi and Assad all had no problem keeping the crazies in check. We opened the flood gates for the Orks.

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    4. .

      Please give us an alternative, Ash. What exactly do you propose?

      And where should we start? (Note the map I put up above.)

      And will any of these solutions involve you Canadians?

      .

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    5. Personally I am willing to let the chips fall where they may and if those bastards seize power then they will have to deal with the responsibilities that come with that power. I don't think we should help them, far from it, but I don't think we should intervene militarily and help them decide what is right for them.

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    6. Actually Deuce, Saddam, Mubarak, Ghaddafi and Assad all had great difficulty keeping the "crazies in check". All but Assad have, to date, fallen from power.

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    7. and it isn't just that they've fallen from power as evidence of their troubles but the extent that they had to rule with an "iron fist" to stay in power. Saddam, near the end of his reign was making a big effort to show his 'muslim side' and that was after mass killing a bunch in addition to his secret service kills trying to hold on to power. Of course maintaining power was never a simple dichotomy of secular vs Jihadists...

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    8. it can be a loooong and deadly fall :-O

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  11. I got to the part where it said the US did not have to put troops on the ground and then stopped reading. They have no clue.

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  12. Lets form a battalion composed of both houses of Congress and key staff. Have them do the right thing, go to Mali and do the right thing for their country. Think of all the bridges and highways and post offices we could name for them. Raise the flag boys.

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  13. The Biden Bridge, linking the World as we recently knew it to the Barbarous World of the Distant Past which is soon to come.

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  14. They'll be runnin Afgan Hash into the Zinfandel Port before we know it.
    That will be a heady mix, so to speak.

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  15. "President Obama will unveil a sweeping set of gun-control proposals at midday Wednesday, including an assault weapons ban, universal background checks and limits on the number of bullets that ammunition clips can hold, according to sources familiar with the plans."

    Why don't we do that across Africa, and throughout the ME?
    ...limiting mass deaths to when they revert back to head-hacking.

    Warthogs with a ten round clip limit.

    C-130's limited to Muzzle Loaded Cannons for the Muzzies.
    Swab them barrels boys, we got more killin to do.

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    Replies
    1. I wonder will the new gun control efforts apply to the Justice Department's efforts to arm our Mexican Drug Cartel friends?

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    2. this was me...

      wio

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  16. The first thing the guy gets wrong is the assertion right out of the gate that babies are born atheists.

    What babies are born with is a heavy imprint and remembrance of that most excellent situation in the womb of total security and bliss, interrupted by the catastrophe of a sudden constriction and trip down the birth canal and loss of this wonderful original situation, another early imprint. Understandably enough, most cry at this disaster. Other imprints follow, ex wombo - the imprint of the lesser excellence of bambino and madonna at the tit, interrupted from without by papa and his demands, or maybe a work schedule, leading to resentment of papa (papa is always 'enemy'). The romper room comedy of the sib rivalies follow....one might say we are born and develop early as understandably enough confused folk, but hardly philosophical atheists.

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    1. "What babies are born with is a heavy imprint and remembrance of that most excellent situation in the womb of total security and bliss, interrupted by the catastrophe of a sudden constriction and trip down the birth canal and loss of this wonderful original situation, another early imprint. Understandably enough, most cry at this disaster."

      ---

      Next comes the big letdown when the hormones subside, and the ding dong reverts back to twinkie size.

      Father slinks away, ashamed of all the bragging he did during that first week.

      Delete
  17. exegesis

    interpretation

    hermeneutics

    often useful tools in understanding a narrative

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exegesis

    Using tools such as this some have understood, who knows, perhaps correctly, the story of Abraham and Isaac as a narrative marking the end of human sacrifice for this people, for instance.

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    1. As we are told, for instance, that this group derived from the city, which was supported by farming, there in that fairyland of Rufian Jeffersonian democracy, Iraq of old, and tended toward and took up sheep herding, which really isn't all that far from hunter/gathering, and we recall what has been said concerning the lack of human sacrifice among the hunter/gatherers over against its practice among the farming/city folk.

      Just a thought.

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  18. Now this could prove to be an interesting start of something:

    (just the first and last bit of the article)

    Germany plans to repatriate billions in gold from New York, Paris: report

    Germany’s central bank is said to be planning to repatriate thousands of tonnes of gold held at other central banks in a throwback to the Cold War.

    The Bundesbank has scheduled a news conference for tomorrow, but there are no details, other than that the meeting with reporters will be about its gold reserves.

    But Handelsblatt, a daily German paper, reported that the central bank will bring home some of the 1,500 tons held at the Federal Reserve in New York and more at the Bank of Paris.


    ...

    “If gold repatriation becomes a worldwide trend, it will be obvious that both the U.S. and U.K. have lost their credibility as gold custodians,” the CRG said.

    An independent auditing office, the Federal Court of Auditors, recommended last year that the Bundesbank monitor its gold holdings outside Germany more frequently, sparking a political row, and officials said they would listen to the recommendations where possible. The Bundesbank said, though, that it had "differing views" with the FCA over the scope of an audit sought by the agency, which did not conform to the practices of central banks.

    In the wake of that, Bundesbank executive board member Carl-Ludwig Thiele stressed the central bank’s confidence in the system.

    “We do not have the slightest doubt that our holdings in New York and Paris are also made up of the purest fine gold,” he said in a press interview still posted on the central bank’s website.

    “We have at our disposal fully documented lists of the bars, and our partner central banks send us every year confirmation not only of the bars’ existence but also of their quality,” he added.

    “We receive confirmation of our gold reserves, measured in troy ounces. The Bundesbank has been drawing up its accounts on this basis since it came into existence. All external auditors have confirmed our accounting practices outright since then.”

    The Bundesbank, he said at the time, “decided to strive” for balanced distribution.

    “Gold stored in your home safe is not immediately available as collateral in case you need foreign currency,” he said in the interview.

    “Take, for instance, the key role that the U.S. dollar plays as a reserve currency in the global financial system. The gold held with the New York Fed can, in a crisis, be pledged with the Federal Reserve Bank as collateral against U.S. dollar-denominated liquidity. Similar pound sterling liquidity could be obtained by pledging the gold that is held with the Bank of England.”


    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/top-business-stories/germany-plans-to-repatriate-billions-in-gold-from-new-york-paris-report/article7360909/

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    1. We are running on the fumes of our reserve currency status.
      When they run out, the fecal material will really start to fly.

      Delete
  19. The Orwellian American Community Survey


    The American Community Survey wasn't around when Ronald Reagan declared that the nine most terrifying words in the English language are: "I'm from the government and I'm here to help." If it was, he'd probably agree that having a government representative knock on your door, try to threaten their way into your home, and demand that you give them very personal information is far more terrifying.

    My nightmare started in January when I received the American Community

    Survey (ACS) form in the mail. The ACS is an extension of the U.S. Census that all households receive. While the U.S. Census form contains 10 questions and is sent out every 10 years, the ACS form contains 48 questions and is sent to 250,000 households each month on a rolling basis.

    The ACS itself is a lesson in government overreach. Article 1 of the Constitution allows for a census every 10 years so that seating in Congress is proportional to state populations. Lawmakers gave the Commerce Department the power to ask more questions, and it took the power and ran, and ran, with it -- ending up asking questions unrelated to districting. (ACS answers, according to its website, are to help "manage or evaluate federal and state government programs" -- not to help with congressional seating.)

    What's especially problematic about the ACS are the answers it demands from citizens. The least threatening of them are just strange -- such as asking whether your home has a flush toilet and whether "there is a business (such as a store or barber shop) or a medical practice" on your property. Then there are the financial questions. The ACS asks everything from your sources of income (in dollar amounts) to how much you spend on gas, electricity, and water. The IRS just asks what you earn; the Commerce Department wants to know how you spend your money as well.

    Even more invasive are the personal questions. The questionnaire asks how many people live with you and their relationship to you, along with their names, ages, gender, and race. Most creepy of all are the questions about your daily routine. The ACS wants to know where you work, what time you leave for work, how you get to work, how long it takes you to get to work, and how many people travel with you.

    Downright Orwellian. That was my first thought when I received the form. And initially I didn't quite believe that the government would demand such personal information and threaten citizens with fines (up to $5,000) if they don't hand it over. When friends, from Justice Department officials to university lecturers, heard about it from me, their first thought was that it was some kind of sophisticated mail fraud. After learning that the ACS was real, I reluctantly spent an hour answering the questions -- vowing at the same time to protest to my representatives in Congress -- and dropped the form in the mail toward the end of January.

    A few weeks after sending in the form, a representative of the ACS left a note at my apartment asking me to contact her. When I did, she said she'd like to come to my apartment to go through the questions. I replied that I'd already filled out the form, and if they'd lost it, it was their duty to find it. I also didn't want a stranger entering my home and asking personal questions (and ones that I'd already answered), I told her.

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    1. I have on my desk as I type the "Census of Agriculture - National Agricultural Statistics Service", a quite heavy mailing, which threatens fines and says "YOUR RESPONSE IS REQUIRED BY LAW".

      Last time around, five years or so ago, I let it slide, but they didn't, and bugged me with increasing pressures until I finally relented, and filled it out.

      I will fill it out. It is not that big a deal, and I'm interested in some of the results myself, which are available after the survey period is over and the results counted.

      How many more farmers have we lost nationwide since the last counting for instance, or have we finally hit bottom with that, or does it hath no bottom, like Bottom's Dream, or is it perhaps turtles all the way down, if we have any turtle farmers.

      Delete
    2. We'll still have our Hawaiian Giants.
      We post gaurds around them eggs.

      They are so large, they should learn to play the Ukulele and pass themselves off as the Iz's of WaterWorld.

      ...some unexploited opportunity there.

      Delete
  20. RAND PAUL: 'Having a monarch is what we fought the American Revolution over'... NRA membership grows by quarter million in one month...

    drudge

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  21. Conservative restaurateur charges liberals $1 surcharge on drinks...drudge

    Alas, Rufus is a solitary drinker, the worst kind according to Hemingway, and drinks at home.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I'm a solitary drinker and drink at home (at times).

    ReplyDelete
  23. Europe's auto makers are betting much of their fortunes this year on the promise of steady U.S. demand for new cars, raising the stakes for U.S. and Asian car makers as the European auto market remains in free fall and even China's once red-hot sales cool.

    Daimler AG's Mercedes-Benz, BMW AG, Volkswagen AG and its luxury Audi brand at the North American International Auto Show this week showed new models aimed especially at broadening the companies' U.S. business.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tesla has a solar powered supercharger in Barstow, halfway between LA and Vegas.

      Fill up in about an hour while you have lunch, then off again.
      Fill up is FREE!

      If that doesn't give Rufie a hard on, what will?
      ...maybe a zero to sixty time of 4 seconds?

      No joke.

      I'd still hate it tho when the batteries start petering out with age along with it's owner:
      Me.

      60 to 70 k

      Carolla loves the idea of never having to go to a gas station again.

      (he's got an extra 50 gal tank in his supercharged Ford Diesel Dually that he hauls his racecars with)

      Delete
  24. Hemmingway never drank alone?

    ...I doubt that.

    (your reply linkie didn't work - that's a first for me)

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    Replies
    1. You always have to remember, Hemingway was a big bullshitter lots of times.

      Probably good advice though.

      I doubt he never drank alone, too.

      Delete
    2. It certainly is cheaper to drink at home. Not sure about alone.

      Delete
  25. Democracy remains fragile in Pakistan. The elections due this year – if they take place – would be the first time that an elected government completes its term and hands over to another elected government.

    Ali Dayan Hasan, Pakistan director for Human Rights Watch, said that it would be “extremely naïve” to believe that the court order was coincidental to the protest.

    “What is being created is a constitutional crisis and that breakdown will make space for extra-constitutional measures,” said Mr Hasan. “This order, and its timing, exposes the Supreme Court as a partisan actor.”

    ReplyDelete
  26. Democracy remains fragile in Pakistan...

    That gets the understatement award of the week.

    Glad our Supremes are anything but partisan.

    When the Obama Majority gets seated, we're going into hyperdrive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pray Pubs take the Senate in '14 and don't mess it up this time.

      Delete
    2. Pubs v The Won?

      Give me a break.

      ...and the World will live as one.

      Delete
  27. Stewart v Krugman

    http://hotair.com/greenroom/archives/2013/01/15/round-two-jon-stewart-versus-paul-krugman-on-the-trillion-dollar-coin/

    ReplyDelete
  28. Gun-control advocates, including the mothers of two victims of mass shootings, gathered at a Wal-Mart store near Newtown, Connecticut, on Tuesday to call on the country's largest retailer to stop selling assault weapons.

    About 50 people - many calling themselves proud gun owners and loyal Wal-Mart customers - presented a petition at a Wal-Mart in Danbury that is 8 miles from the Newtown elementary school where a gunman opened fire one month ago, killing 20 first graders and six educators.

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  29. Take Ron Yurcus for example. The hospice chaplain routinely played various lottery games but failed to check the Powerball ticket he bought last August.

    For three months.

    Then, in November, Yurcus was cleaning his desk and found the ticket. He decided he should check the numbers before throwing it away.

    And, left to right, as each one matched, his eyes got bigger.

    ...

    Most unclaimed tickets are, in actuality, small prizes of a few dollars or more. But those add up to millions every year.

    After 365 days, lottery prizes expire and are reclaimed into an unclaimed prize fund, the money used for various state purposes and additional jackpots.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Replies
    1. I haven't even seen a Doug2 post yet.

      Is he a Rufusarian Atheist to balance out DOUGMAN?

      Delete
  31. Wyoming is the first state in America to consider a “just say no” approach to proposed federal gun bans.

    ...

    According to The Daily Caller,

    “it also contains broad language prohibiting any “public servant … or dealer selling any firearm in this state” from enforcing “any act, law, statute, rule or regulation of the United States government relating to a personal firearm, firearm accessory or ammunition that is owned or manufactured commercially or privately in Wyoming and that remains exclusively within the borders of Wyoming.””

    The specific text of the bill states:

    Any federal law, rule, regulation or order created or effective on or after January 1, 2013 shall be unenforceable within the borders of Wyoming if the law, rule, regulation or order attempts to:
    (i) Ban or restrict ownership of a semiautomatic firearm or any magazine of a firearm; or
    (ii) Require any firearm, magazine or other firearm accessory to be registered in any manner.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Does not work with regards marijuana, doubt it'll work with guns.

      The Federals DO have their own Courts, judges and prisons.

      Gun charges carry pretty heavy mandated periods of incarceration

      Delete
  32. Replies
    1. He is the inbred nephew of Bengali, out of Bygolly, it gets complex.

      Delete
    2. He was the actor in the television series, the Fugitive.

      Delete
    3. No, it was "Run for Your Life."

      Delete
    4. He was not. That was David Janssen.

      You're thinking of Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi, who whipped the Ethiopians in the 1500's.

      Delete
    5. I had a cat in college named The Fuge, after Janson, my hero who we never missed.
      I had a big old used tv up in the top of my closet.
      Ran some fish line back to my be.
      By pulling on the line, one of those heavy 45 adaptors that fit over the 33 spindle would roll down an push in the on off switch, saving me that arduous journey to the TV.

      My real name is Goldberg (Rube), but with all the anti-semitism swirling around, I'm sticking with Doug, hoping not to get crowded out by all the newly arrived Dougs of various stripes.

      Delete
  33. I'd like to squeak in and thank Doug for thinking of me in the previous thread. That was kind and made me smile. You made my day even more special.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Then thank him by putting up some detox music. We are about to expire.

      Delete
    2. Happy Birthday, Mel!

      Delete
    3. Most Welcome, Mel.
      Happy B Day to you.
      I'll try harder next year and maybe you'll squeal with delight instead of just squeaking in.
      (not that there's anything wrong w/that)

      Delete
    4. I only squeaked in so i wouldn't interrupt any serious conversation that was going on. Ya know people are watching…

      You know me I usually don't squeak into anything. It's not my style.

      And please don't wait a year to tell me your story.

      Delete
  34. Then there's Ben Gallo, who works down at the funeral home -

    http://www.smithgallo.com/fh/aboutus/staff_member.cfm?stf_id=9943&fh_id=11970

    ReplyDelete
  35. Was looking for that Ben whatshisname that used to be on Dr Kildare or whatitwas, the old dude with the Einstein hair, and the bath salts look.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Replies
    1. But check out Idaho -

      Vegas: 60,000 Expected To Attend Gun Show...
      Idaho: 'People can hardly walk they've got so much stuff'...
      S Dakota: 'Unprecedented demand'...
      Kentucky: 'Store shelves bare'...
      Virginia: Lines Stretched for Hundreds of Yards...
      Citizens File Articles of Impeachment Against Obama...drudge

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    3. .

      Merely, a little dig at your Idaho reference.

      Not all that funny.

      .

      Delete
    4. .

      If I march on D.C., it will be with the 'Occupy' protesters. If you are going to protest, you might as well have a good time.

      .

      Delete
    5. Some truth in that.

      ...

      One way to think of it -


      The 2nd Amendment calls for a well regulated militia. It isn't about hunting ruffed grouse. And goes further than shooting home invaders. I was a member of the Idaho militia all my life, till I olded out. A simple act of our legislature, or a proclamation by Gov. Butch could put me right back in. The Idaho National Guard may be thought of as the well regulated arm of our general militia, the officer corps so to speak.

      Delete
    6. You should have little cart with Nair Products (www.naircare.com/)

      See if you could start some movement other than the already Old Bowell Movement on the Squad Car trick.

      Delete
    7. I want my militia to be close shaved.
      None of them Hollywood 3 day beard dorks.

      Will we live long enough to see that Fad Fade Away,
      or is it here for eternity?

      Delete
  37. Corleone apologizes for decades of Mafia murders

    Corleone, the Sicilian hill town that is synonymous with the Mafia through books and films, has asked forgiveness for the murders, shootings and intimidation committed by its godfathers.


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/9803443/Corleone-apologises-for-decades-of-Mafia-murders.html

    What a dump.

    ReplyDelete
  38. The nearest rebel-controlled area, Bustan al-Qasr, is more than a mile away from the university.

    Activists have rejected the suggestion that insurgents were behind the attack, however, and instead blamed the government.

    "The warplanes of this criminal regime do not respect a mosque, a church or a university," said a student who gave his name as Abu Tayem.

    ReplyDelete
  39. .

    The World Bank has sharply reduced its estimate of global economic growth in 2013, projecting that the downturn in Europe and the United States’ fiscal problems will continue to weigh on investment and spending.

    The bank said it expects the world economy to expand 2.4 percent this year, compared with 3 percent growth it had forecast as of June...


    The bank forecast U.S. growth of 1.9 percent — less than the most-pessimistic estimates from the Federal Reserve. The bank also foresaw more modest growth for China in coming years — 8.4 percent in 2013, slowing to about 8 percent the following two years...



    World Bank Trims Growth Forecast

    .

    ReplyDelete
  40. .

    More political scullduggery by the GOP.

    What’s on the table?

    Basically, Republicans who have control of states that went for President Obama in the 2012 election are pushing for their states to change how they award electoral votes. While almost every state awards electoral votes on a winner-take-all basis, Republicans want these states to instead award one vote to the winner of each congressional district.

    The other two electoral votes that each state has likely would be given to the statewide winner, as they are in the two states that currently employ this method: Maine and Nebraska.

    The new system would allow Republicans to consistently win electoral votes (and quite possibly a majority of electoral votes) from states like Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Virginia, regardless of whether they win the statewide vote...


    The Electoral College Gambit

    .

    ReplyDelete
  41. If your name was Reince Priebus, you'd probly be doin something with your skull, too.
    Judge Not...

    ReplyDelete
  42. If you've ever engaged in scullduggery, are you morally obligated to remove your registration as an organ donor?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. .

      You are at least morally obligated to make the fact known and the same applies with regard to your significant other.

      Legally, it varies by state.

      .

      Delete
  43. Only if you've got the heart for it, and can liver with it.

    ReplyDelete
  44. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b74KBkQYayk

    Lexington band - Smrti se ne bojim

    ReplyDelete
  45. .

    Obamacare Will Cost Jobs

    American manufacturers are already struggling to recover, never mind expand. In that context, the Obama health law’s employer mandate proves especially counterproductive.

    The Census Bureau doesn’t calculate how many manufacturing firms are near the 50-employee threshold. But its numbers do show that the majority of them are small enough that the employer mandate may be a significant problem. Of America’s total 258,662 manufacturing companies, 197,701 had fewer than 20 employees in 2010, around the time when hiring growth picked up. Another 46,005 had between 20 and 99 employees.

    And it doesn’t matter that most manufacturers already provide health care: The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) estimates that 97 percent of its members already do so. Employers’ plans must cover at least 60 percent of employees’ average health expenses, and workers can’t contribute more than 9.5 percent of their family income, or the fees kick in anyway. That $2,000-per-employee penalty falls on top of the stiff taxes, trade barriers, and environmental limitations that manufacturers already have to contend with.

    “The employer mandate is part of the overall negative business climate that manufacturers have been facing,” NAM spokesman Matt Lavoie observes. “It’s 20 percent more expensive to manufacture something in the United States than in our major trading partners, and that’s before you add in labor costs.”



    I Don't know if the numbers provided in this article are true, but if they are, it's disheartening.

    .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thing was passed in the dead of night without being read.

      Delete
  46. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-eWy-LhEUs

    Kentucky Horse Farms

    ReplyDelete