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Sunday, November 23, 2008

We are all Doomed and are going to die.

Canadian environmentalists say that the coming 23 year long cooling cycle is just a blip on way to true warming damnation.

New satellite indicates cycle of global cooling


November 20, 2008 Spokesman Review

Several Canadian environmental scientists agree the new Jason satellite indicates at least a 23-year cycle of global cooling ahead.

This oceanographic satellite shows a much larger than normal persistent Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Cooler PDO phases usually last 21 to 25 years, so we could be quite chilly as a planet until at least 2030, maybe longer.

However, based on long-term climatic cycles, there is another cycle of intense global warming, due by 2031 to 2038, when many of our weather cycles "collide in chaos."

These alternating natural climatic cycles defy the so-called climate consensus that human-emitted carbon dioxide was completely responsible for the recent cycle of global warming that began in the late 1970s and peaked in 1998. But, I do believe that human activities are enhancing environmental problems.

The Earth's previous warming phase from 1915 through 1939, which peaked in 1936 creating the infamous Dust Bowl, was about as warm as the recent cycle of global warming.

The last cooler cycle of global temperatures occurred from late 1939 to early 1976, peaking (or bottoming) in 1973. The harsh winters during World War II helped the U.S. and its allies defeat the Germans and later assisted our GIs in the Korean War because of extremely heavy snows and subzero temperatures north of the 38th parallel.

In the past 10 years, especially the past couple of years, the Earth's overall climate has cooled a bit, even though CO2 emissions have soared on a worldwide scale. However, as mentioned last week, temperatures continue to be much above normal in the Arctic regions. Only time will tell on where we go from here.

As far as our local weather is concerned, a parade of Pacific storms marched across the Inland Northwest during the first 13 days of this November. Then high pressure moved into the region, giving us mostly dry and cool and mild afternoon temperatures.

Our overall weather pattern should turn toward the wetter side. I now see some measurable snowfall around the Thanksgiving holiday into early December. The first half of the winter of 2008-09 should produce above normal amounts of snow.

Temperatures should be colder, however, with subzero readings expected around the Jan. 11-18 full moon cycle as a huge Arctic high pressure ridge moves in from the north into Eastern Washington and North Idaho as well as the surrounding regions of the Northwest.

It still looks better than a 50 percent chance of a brilliant White Christmas in the Inland Northwest, considerably higher probabilities than usual for the season.


73 comments:

  1. ...meanwhile while we are busy freezing to death and going broke our fearless ruler and master is in Peru meeting with international leaders. The President warned against government intervention in free markets.

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  2. Dang, that's me:) Working on the crossword puzzle in the morning. I just go up to turn the heat up. And there I am.

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  3. A friend told me that come the first of December, you'll be able to go to your mortgage lender and renegotiate your mortgage terms. He says that all you have to do is put the home on the market at the price you paid and since it will not sell, you simply tell your lender what interest rate or loan payment you can make and voila. You're bailed out.

    Ain't this a wonderful country?

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  4. Three major conundrums:
    1. Climate Change.
    2. Peak Oil.
    3. State of the world economy.

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  5. Climate change is not man made.

    Oil reserves are finite.

    The economy is far worse than people are prepared to believe. We had a 75% chance of stopping the decline in the fall. Now we are down to about a 25% chance and falling at an accelerating pace.

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  6. Three major conundrums
    ==

    Solve for one and the rest will solve themselves.

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  7. Oil reserves are finite.
    ==

    We knew exactly how finite it is 30-40 years ago, and did everything to waste this time building ever increasing dependence on oil.

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  8. I'll boil it all down to just one issue:

    Cheap energy

    With sufficient cheap energy, everything else can be resolved. Without it, well...

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  9. It ain't the end of the world.
    The sun still rises.
    Birds still sing.
    Seasons change.
    ********************************
    During the heyday, I liked to observe everyone wanted the "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous." Every house had to have multiple walk-in closets and marble-laden, gold plated bathrooms. Many of us realized our dream homes and dream cars and found that they brought only momentary pleasure. Sheryl Crow asked the question, "If it makes you happy, then why the hell are you so sad?"

    For years we've been warned against excess exuberance and gross materialism. Maybe we'll be reminded of the truly important aspects of life.

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  10. With sufficient cheap energy, everything else can be resolved.
    ==

    Oil isn't cheap when you pay trillions on defense to safeguard it.

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  11. The President warned against government intervention in free markets.

    Do as I say not as I do. I'm sure that went over well.

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  12. Oil isn't cheap when you pay trillions on defense to safeguard it.

    Trillions? Shit, the Somali Pirates only want $10 million a pop, how about we just pay them off and save many hundreds of billions?

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  13. I also agree that this is a time of great opportunity:

    -Resurrecting industry and manufacturing over finance.

    - Dramatically reducing military commitments.

    - Focussing on smaller rather than larger in all things.

    - Resurrecting thrift over mindless consumption.

    - Focus on the Americas.

    - Achieve true energy independence.

    - Return to conservation instead of
    environmentalism.

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  14. Trillions? Shit, the Somali Pirates only want $10 million a pop, how about we just pay them off and save many hundreds of billions?
    ==

    Not so easy to payoff the incestuous corruptokrats in Washington, in the Pentagon, in the CIA, in the DOS, in the military industrial complex.

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  15. - Return to conservation instead of
    environmentalism.
    ==

    Some would define them as almost the same. Conservation and environmentalism.

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  16. Totally different:

    Environmentalism is don't touch, do tell. Conservation is using your limited resources wisely. Conservation is living well humbly. Environmentalism is the latest cult of our collective inner child.

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  17. I agree with Whit's Sun Nov 23, 10:31:00 AM EST You got to have enough to live ok, more doesn't make you any happier, at least for most people. Particularily when you get older. I remember mom. You just want the washing machine on the same floor, and an efficient kitchen, maybe a tv, and a bridge club to go to, and some friends.

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  18. Environmentalism is worrying unduly about the Giant Palouse Earthworm, which nobody I know has ever seen. Conservation is stopping soil erosion, and using timber resources wisely.

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  19. Environmentalism is don't touch
    ==

    I'm not going to touch this. :)

    Other than to say that's a scare tactic used by big oil big media big business and their big government corruptokrats to bamboozle people.

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  20. Bobal, the giant Palouse Earthworm made all those rolling hills.

    It is related genetically to the Mima Mounds Maggot.

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  21. :)I've never seen anything quite like that.

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  22. No one knows if it was made by the Vashon Ice Lobe 13,000 years ago, or by gophers, or what. So I suggested a relative of the Giant Palouse Earthworm. PROVE ME WRONG!

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  23. Energy versus Water: Solving Both Crises Together
    Water is needed to generate energy. Energy is needed to deliver water. Both resources are limiting the other—and both may be running short. Is there a way out?

    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=the-future-of-fuel&print=true

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  24. Methuselah: Water is needed to generate energy. Energy is needed to deliver water. Both resources are limiting the other—and both may be running short. Is there a way out?

    There's always the Solyent Green option. People are composed of 70% water by weight.

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  25. There's always the Solyent Green option. People are composed of 70% water by weight.
    ==

    The Matrix Overloaded: Clean Energy Will Depend on a New, 'Smart' Grid

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122479941639164453.html

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  26. For years we've been warned against excess exuberance and gross materialism. Maybe we'll be reminded of the truly important aspects of life.

    Sun Nov 23, 10:31:00 AM EST

    Take your average American family, reduce its income by half, move it into a noisy, smelly flat in a dangerous neighborhood, and watch what happens.

    The idea that material comfort and convenience are not only NOT a part of, but actually opposed to, the important things in life, is perhaps a remnant of our Protestant heritage. But like the Romantic idea of the Noble Savage, it is a clumsy and deeply flawed one.

    It does, however, have utility for certain collectivists.

    The gentlest, most benign lives, I have observed, are not those of want, but of plenty. And more broadly, the most unselfconsciously happy, benevolent, confident people I know are we acquisitive, materialistic, comfortable Americans. That IS our very aspect. Of which, unfortunately, we are mostly unaware.


    Would we be a finer people moved into the slums of Sao Paulo or yurts in Mongolia? A giant trailer park in Alabama? Would we be improved by Bob's idea of "just enough to live on" and no more? (How much is "just enough" anyway? Ever watch Survivorman?) Would we be happier? More generous? More appreciative of the important aspects of life?

    If it's downright silly to believe that deprivation lifts and enlivens the spirit, consider how preposterous it is to believe that if only we gave up walk-in closets and plasma televisions we'd be closer to understanding the true value of things.

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  27. In the movie "Tank Girl" Malcolm McDowell sticks something into people's back that filters all their blood into pure drinking water, which fills a plastic water bottle attached to the device. He likes to stick it in the backs of his enemies and then drinks the end product with a flourish. Sounds so Republican.

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  28. Who is it exactly that's talking of deprivation other than you?

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  29. You got to have enough to live ok

    Deprivation sucks.

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  30. if only we gave up walk-in closets and plasma televisions we'd be closer to understanding the true value of things.

    Actually I think that might be true, at least as far as the plasma tv goes.

    I've never had a walk in closet so I don't know how they affect one's perception of reality.

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  31. Bobal: I've never had a walk in closet so I don't know how they affect one's perception of reality.

    I had a real big one until about 1990 when I was discharged from the Nav. Civilian employment didn't hinge on such things.

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  32. I can tell you this, though, there's never been a near death experiencer yet who came back and said it was about the Mercedes Benz, the expense account, even the fancy girl in the fur coat. They never say those things. In fact, they come back not giving a shit about them.

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  33. Bobal, a smoker friend of mine had a stroke, he spent months in bed with half of his skull sitting in a freezer somewhere. I thought he was gonna be stuck in that bed from now until lights out. He made a recovery, the doctor put his lid back on, and he's standing up now and shaking hands. Probably ready to drive soon. It's a miracle! But he's smoking again, and I'm thinking the good Lord only hands out one miracle per customer.

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  34. Deprivation sucks.
    ==

    Deprivation and depravity is what we have today. Deprivation dictated by corporate propaganda. Deprivation of public space. Deprivation of human interaction. Deprivation of community. Deprivation of human urban scale. Deprivation of leisure time. Deprivation of our earnings and savings to support corporate welfare. The depravity of the corporate agenda is in every facet of our life.

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  35. I agree, Trish.

    I was simpy thinking that things had gotten out of kilter. With so many knowing nothing but comfort and excess, the culture is trending toward decadence. Sometimes a little suffering restores the equilibrium.

    I was thinking of ying/yang and dingalings.

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  36. Sun Nov 23, 01:17:00 PM EST

    :)

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  37. I've known some rich people who were just as tight as the bark on a tree.

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  38. I wasn't actually thinking of anyone's yingyang, rather the yin and yang.

    Yingyang is not to be confused with yin yang and dingalings are similar to but not quite dingleberries.

    BTW - I love the Urban Dictionary.

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  39. The premise of whit's statement is that material acquisitions are detrimental to appreciation of that which is truly important. Accepting this premise, reduced circumstances are a boon to the value placed on "the important," as opposed to the unimportant, aspects of life. Therefor, the more reduced the circumstances, the greater the understanding of the meaningful, the relevant, the weighty.

    To be materially deprived is to be enlightened.

    I have not found this to be so, but damned if it does not persist.

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  40. Which is how they got rich, and the habit stuck. Altruistic they were not.

    And at least one strand of the Protestant heritage proclaims that wealth is a sign of favor by God.

    So you can have it both here and in the hereafter, none of this woe to you rich, you have had your reward.

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  41. I think whit said 'excess exuberance and gross materialism.'

    Like that Hilton girl.

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  42. :(

    Upon further investigation, I don't know about the Urban Dictionary.

    Check out the entries on Ann Coulter

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  43. oops, sorry wrong blog.

    God damn, I can't multi task.

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  44. MLD, I don't believe we've ever met but I have "overread" some of your conversations with the regulars. How did you find your way to this gin joint?

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  45. At 1:49, someone stretched the premise to the breaking point of an illogical "therefor" conclusion.

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  46. Kewl!

    http://www.klimatec-airpro.com/

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  47. How else, whit, am I supposed to make my point and prevent you from unintentionally accepting and propagating a hidden premise that would benefit those you rightly oppose? : )





    Calvinism and the concept of the Calling, wasn't it, bob?

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  48. Well, Whit, if you read my sarcasm you would know that I said, "I've been reading this blog on and off for over a year after I googled, uptight frigid politicians."

    Really, I don't know. I have been reading for a while, though. The art is fantastic. I'm not big on politics. It just bores me. But, I think the EB is interesting so I come here to get all my information and hear different views on certain things.

    Honestly, I commented on a provocative picture that was put up a while ago, just to break the ice. Weeks before the election the tension in this room was so thick I could cut it with a knife. No one gave in, though, it was like I wasn't even there. Not until after the election. So, I keep reading and every once in a while I put my two cents in but never, ever about the post at hand.

    Because that would be no fun. Right?

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  49. I would solemnly suggest, bob, that Paris Hilton offends, not because of her wealth, but because of her frivolity.

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  50. I have never been poor that I noticed but have been up, down and sideways.

    Wealth and money are not the same thing. When I was kicked out of Greece, I took everything I owned in my car. The only thing I left behind was my bank account. I never got that back, but I was free, had options and a future. I certainly did not feel poor.

    Like anyone who has spent time around the world, it is obvious that if you are fortunate to escape poverty, you never want to go back. The worst part abut poverty is everyone else makes your decisions for you.

    If you know how to make it, you can lose all your possessions, make it again and never feel poor through the entire experience.

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  51. MLD, we have all enjoyed your comments.

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  52. ...and every once in a while I put my two cents in but never, ever about the post at hand.

    Because that would be no fun. Right?


    Absolutely, why should you be the only one to comment on topic?

    If you go back to the early days of the EB, Deuce and I were much more diligent about the blogging part of the business. Eventually the drunks "wore us out." Nowadays, we mostly just serve up new offerings to keep the threads manageably short. I say "we", but I've taken a looooooooong holiday...Mostly, I just lurk...

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  53. Some more than others. So it goes.

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  54. Humility in life is realized when you have children.

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  55. You soon learn your limitations.

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  56. I just googled "uptight frigid politicians" and this came up at the top of the list.

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  57. Thanks, I just spew coffee everywhere.

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  58. Actually, this is the first time we've shared it but a few months ago, Deuce and I sold the EB to a group of Danish Investors. Deuce has remained on under a lucrative management contract and I am enjoying my fabulous new found wealth and early retirement.

    America has been good to us but soon we will return to Eastern and southern Europe where we will be coordinating "relief and trade relations."

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  59. But don't worry, Pieter assures us that the EB will transition seamlessly as soon as their new management teams completes its worldwind US "cultural assimilation tour." (Although they're Dutch and very liberal, Pieter is confident that the EB clientele will be thoroughly pleased with the new management.

    Deuce and I just say WTH, we got the money, we're outta here.

    Hasta la vista, baby!

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  60. Well, it's nice to know someone still has a imagination.

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  61. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  62. The following summary shows the difference in temperature in degrees C from January 2007 to January 2008 as reported by the four agencies.

    n Hadley Climate Research Unit — minus 0.595.

    n NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies — minus 0.750.

    n Christy group at the University of Alabama — minus 0.588.

    n Remote Sensing Systems Inc. in California — minus 0.629.


    Doubt on Global Warming

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  63. ...whirlwind cultural assimilation tour...

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  64. In a former storage room in South Elementary School in Des Plaines, volunteer teacher Joy Kadlecik leads a small group of Mexican immigrants in a robust round of Simon Says.

    ...

    Kadlecik said literacy and cultural assimilation tie together to make families stronger by binding them to the community.

    "The idea of this program is to connect children with their families," she said. "If we can make the students here familiar with the American way of life, they can pass that on to their children."


    Language Gap

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