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Monday, August 12, 2013

Seizing power back from Washington won’t be easy but is still possible


August 12, 2013
Mark Levin's The Liberty Amendments

Today marks the publication of Mark Levin's important new book, The Liberty Amendments. I must confess that I had some trepidation when starting to read it, for as the editor of American Thinker I turn down most submissions that propose amending the Constitution as a solution for what ails us. The reason is simple: amending the Constitution is deliberately difficult to accomplish, so changing it is a solution easy to propose and difficult to dispose.

But Mark, whose body of work as a political thinker includes not just the significant tomes Men in Black, Liberty and Tyranny, and Ameritopia but also three hours a day of extemporaneous political talk on one the nation's most popular syndicated talk shows, is in a different category. And not simply because of his stature. The Liberty Amendments consists of a well thought-out program of amendments (offered as a starting point for discussion and modification), combined with a political strategy that could (at least potentially) work: using a constitutional convention called by two-thirds of the states. As Article 5 of the Constitution reads:

The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate.

In Chapter One of the Book, "Restoring the American Republic (also the subtitle of the book itself), Mark lays out his case that judicial precedent and politics have in effect altered the Constitution the framer's intended us to have, and restoring a constitutional republic as originally envisioned is going to require some extensive amending. Fortunately, Mark has posted this chapter online for all to read. I urge readers to click on the link and see the case that Mark makes.

The actual program of amendments, each analyzed in a separate chapter, should be read by all who see in this bold and visionary program a way to recue our republic before it falls, as it surely will if present conditions continue to develop as they have been since the progressives first gained power. Sure, it is easy for me to point out how difficult it is to accomplish the passage of calls for a constitutional convention in 34 states. But take a look at a map of the red states, and then imagine the sort of grass roots movement Mark calls for, one energized and focused on local legislators. And keep in mind that state legislatures would gain enormous resources and power, should something like the program of amendments be ratified. Self-interest, properly checked and balanced, is the essence of our founders' wisdom, and legislative self-interest is a factor worth keeping in mind.

The chapter titles indicate in broad outline the nature of the constitutional program Mark has in mind:

An Amendment to Establish Term Limits for Members of Congress

An Amendment to Restore the Senate (repeal of the 17th Amendment establishing direct elections, provisions for replacement of senators before the end of their terms, and establishing the right of a state legislature to remove a senator upon a two-thirds vote).

An Amendment to Establish Term Limits for Supreme Court Justices and Super-Majority Legislative Override

Two Amendments to Limit Federal Spending and Taxation (limiting the federal government to outlays not exceeding 17.5% of GDP, and limiting total federal tax collections from any source to no more than 15% of a person's income). I must confess that I found reliance on specific numbers troubling here and in a few other amendments because there is so much room for manipulation in calculating GDP and income, or in determining the value of certain dollar amounts included in other amendments.  But Mark makes very clear his is not the last word on this or any other subject, but merely a proposal to get people thinking about an entire package that counteract the transformation of the federal government into a colossus never imagined by the founders.

An Amendment to Limit the Federal Bureaucracy (automatic sunset for all department and agencies if they are not legislatively reauthorized, mandatory congressional authorization of any regulation imposed by bureaucrats if the economic burden exceeds $100 million).

An Amendment to Promote Free Enterprise (redefining the Commerce Clause to a specific grant of power limited to preventing states from impeding commerce among the states, and preventing Congress from regulating commerce within a state).

An Amendment to Protect Private Property (curbing abuses under the Takings Clause).

An Amendment to Grant the States Authority to Directly Amend the Constitution (allowing two thirds of the states, voting for the exact same language, to amend the Constitution, and providing a six year time frame within which the passage must be secured).

An Amendment to Grant States Authority to Check Congress (three fifths of the state legislatures may overturn acts of Congress or larger impact executive orders, within 24 months, with no judicial review permitted).

An Amendment to Protect the Vote (requiring photo ID for voting in person or via mail ballot and prohibiting electronic voting).

My summaries of the gist of each amendment ignore finer points in the text of each, not to mention in the discussions Mark presents.

Conservatives badly need to come together on a vision for America that can be presented to the American people as a way out of our dysfunctions that multiply with each growth of federal power. If Mark Levin succeeds in kicking off a grassroots movement to restore the constitutional balance, he will have performed a historic public service.

109 comments:

  1. Even as the Obama Administration approved the country's third natural gas export terminal, the United States remained a net importer of natural gas. Production in the United States averaged 69.5 billion cubic feet (bcf) per day this year through May, the latest month for which data is available. But the country consumed 76.9 bcf per day. It IMPORTED almost 7.8 bcf per day from Canada. And, then it EXPORTED about 1.8 bcf per day to Mexico, a number that is likely to rise as pipeline export capacity to Mexico expands. (Both Canada and Mexico are part of an integrated North American natural gas pipeline system.)

    The latest approval would lift the capacity for daily liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports from the United States to 5.6 bcf per day or about 8 percent of what we currently produce. The exports would be shipped using special freighters to Europe and Asia. Strangely, these exports would make it necessary for the United States to IMPORT more natural gas in order to support current consumption! The situation seems surreal, and yet, additional approvals for LNG exports are likely in the future.

    Natural gas producers keep telling the public and policy makers that U.S. natural gas production is set to grow continuously for decades as they tap large shale gas resources using hydraulic fracturing. But the story isn't holding up. U.S. natural gas production has been moribund for the last 17 months, failing to rise above the peak set in January 2012. This is despite prices that have nearly doubled from the lows in April 2012.

    It's possible that the situation could change, but unlikely for two reasons. Production decline rates for . . . . .

    Exporting away our lifeblood

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same old same old Rufus

      Natural Gas cheaper today than in 2003


      Natural gas spot prices at Henry Hub — a key benchmark and major trading location—averaged $3.75/MMBtu during the first half of 2013, up 57% from the $2.39/MMBtu average spot price for the first half of 2012.

      However, this year-over-year price increase principally reflected the extremely low prices in
      2012. Spot prices so far in 2013 are very similar to levels seen in 2009 to 2011

      (see chart below).

      Delete
    2. Doug, why can't you post your information without attacking other posters (usually, it seems, ME?)

      Is your life so shitty that the only happiness you can get is trying to push around some imaginary boogy online?

      Delete
    3. Yeah, Mr. Civility, we saw how you treated Quirk in the last thread.

      You repeatedly post your inaccurate end of the World Crapola and expect us to swallow it?

      Delete
    4. North Dakota will be producing more oil in 20 years than they do today, despite all your bad mouthing of Fracking.

      Delete
    5. As Sarah says, Drill Baby, Drill, and that's just what they're going to do in ND.

      Delete
    6. If you'll click back you'll see that I didn't start the altercation on the previous thread, just like I didn't start this one.

      Whether you "like it," or don't like it, the U.S. is still a Net nat gas Importer. Calling me a "Fucking Gasbag" doesn't change that.

      And, my money is that N. Dakota will be producing Less oil in 3 yrs than they are today.

      And, I know damned well that N. Dakota, and California will be Producing More Renewable Energy in 3 years than they are today.

      Beautiful Day for Renewables in California

      Delete
    7. Gotta amend that; My money is that N. Dakota production will be declining in 3 yrs. It might not be back to today's levels for another year or so after that.

      Delete
    8. Year to year fluctuations are just that.
      Fact is, they have proven resources that will keep the same number of rigs busy in ten years that they do today.

      Delete
    9. Says the guy that is seemingly unaware that the rig count has dropped from 217 a few months ago to less than 180, Today.

      Delete
    10. Prices in barrel equivalents:

      Brent $118/bbl

      Asian LNG $89/bbl

      European Natural Gas $54/bbl

      US Natural Gas $15/bbl

      Delete
    11. Actually, Brent is selling for about $108.00/bbl, today.

      However, the jist of what you're saying is true. And, why the hell wouldn't we want to keep it that way? A lot of that nat gas is coming from Federal lands. Why would we want to export it, and in the process bring U.S. prices up to the same level as Asia's?

      They already have the slave labor; lower nat gas prices is just about all that we have working for us, at present.

      Delete
    12. Gee, "only" 180 rigs working 365 days a year.

      That does add up, as they sure as hell aren't capping wells at that rate.

      North Dakota now produces more oil than any other state except Texas.

      Delete
    13. And, about those "year to year fluctuations." This just proves to me that you don't really understand "fracking," or the decline rates inherent in fracked wells.

      Quite simply, Fracking is more like "plumbing" than it is similar to traditional drilling. When you frack a well in the Bakken you are 99% sure to get oil. The only question is "how much," and "will it be economical?" (and, will the Bank give you any more money)

      As in all fields, you drill the "sweet spots" first. They are economic at most prices, today. Then, you move out to the less productive spots; that's where it starts to get dicey. At $106.00/bbl for WTI most spots will be economic, but you may have to wait a while longer than banks like for the cash flow to turn positive.

      A reasonable assumption for 2014 might be a few less rigs drilling, and pumping wells that are a bit less productive. THAT'S where the 50%, or so, a year Decline Rates come into play.

      Delete
    14. "Actually, Brent is selling for about $108.00/bbl, today."

      Actually, there are 184 rigs today in North Dakota.

      (since we're picking nits)

      Delete
    15. There is ONE group of businesses that absolutely Have To Be Right about the "Long-term Prospects" of a play. Those are the "Pipeliners;" and they are steadfastly refusing to build pipelines into the Bakken.

      Delete
    16. You know more than everybody, Rufus.
      ...in your own mind.
      To us you're just a broken record on the shortfalls of fracking.
      Despite the fact that this country has vast quantities waiting to be fracked.

      Delete
    17. Then "Scroll, baby, Scroll."

      Delete
    18. Federal actions hold up two N.D. oil pipeline projects

      Two proposed pipelines to ship North Dakota’s oil bounty to Minnesota and beyond got adverse rulings from federal regulators on Friday, leaving the projects’ next steps uncertain.

      The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which regulates interstate pipeline rates, rejected the rate structure for the $2.2 billion Sandpiper Pipeline proposed by Enbridge Inc. and separately threw out a case concerning the $650 million High Prairie Pipeline.

      The regulatory actions could delay, though not necessarily kill, the two pipelines designed to transport 375,000 barrels per day of crude oil from the Bakken region in western North Dakota to oil terminals in Clearbrook, Minn., and Superior, Wis., that feed other pipelines.

      North Dakota is now the nation’s No. 2 oil-producing state, behind Texas. But construction of pipelines to carry away the crude hasn’t kept up, depressing prices at the wellhead. Producers have turned to railroads instead: Tank cars now haul away two-thirds of North Dakota’s oil — a business that stands to gain from Friday’s rulings.

      Delete
    19. from the link:

      Greg Ward, vice president and general counsel for High Prairie Pipeline, said the Durango, Colo.-based company still is reviewing what’s next for the proposed 450-mile, 150,000-barrel-per-day line. Construction hasn’t started because High Prairie complained that Enbridge sought unfair terms to connect the line to Enbridge’s Clearbrook terminal — a charge that company denies.

      The commission concluded that it was premature to act on the High Prairie complaint because the two companies were still negotiating over the terminal connection.
      But Ward said High Prairie and Enbridge haven’t talked in months.

      Sounds like a "he said/she said" case in federal court.

      Then, you get This:

      Sandpiper has had its own controversy. The proposed rate structure provoked protests from Minnesota oil refineries and others who would be slapped with a $1.45-per-barrel surcharge to finance a section of pipeline to Superior that they wouldn’t use.

      “We are not opposed to the project, just with how Enbridge intended to pay for it,” said Jake Reint, spokesman for the Flint Hills refinery in Rosemount.

      In its order, the commission said Enbridge hadn’t submitted enough information for the rate structure, but the order didn’t directly address protests that Enbridge was trying to shift onto shippers much of the pipeline’s financial risks.

      Delete
    20. Which does nothing to resurrect your INCORRECT contention that "Pipeliners" don't want to build to the Bakken.

      Delete
    21. You're right. I have read of several pipeline projects failing for lack of subscription (OneOK being the last,) but was not aware of these two. Unless more information comes along, I'll have to give you this one.

      Delete
    22. Rufus IIMon Aug 12, 06:30:00 AM EDT
      Doug, why can't you post your information without attacking other posters (usually, it seems, ME?)

      Is your life so shitty that the only happiness you can get is trying to push around some imaginary boogy online?


      Dear Rufus,

      FUCK YOU HYPOCRITE

      Delete
    23. We export raw lumber to Japan and then import finished furniture back from them. This is the same deal, but in reverse.

      Delete
    24. The first thing that strikes me, Teresita, is that "Lumber" is a Renewable Resource. Nat Gas is finite; when it's gone, it's gone.

      Delete
    25. Who is to say that Natural Gas is not still pooling and/or being created?


      Oil:
      Oil does NOT take millions of years to create, no matter if you believe in abiotic oil or the generally accepted catagenic process (which takes heat and pressure). Oil has been found in sediments as young as 1,000 years old, and can be created by industrial processes and in the laboratory in only hours. The only part of the process that takes millions of years is the accumulation and burial that precedes the formation of oil from organic remains of plankton.

      Natural gas:
      There is current research that suggests that a significant amount of natural gas in a few wells (not all gas wells) is being formed after the well is drilled by a catalytic reaction in the well, and many natural gas fields are the result of biogenic gas forming as a result of the activity of bacteria in the rock. Much of this biogenic gas is being formed as you read this.

      Coal:
      Coal is no doubt still being created. Many low grade coals exist in the subsurface and as tectonic processes bury those deeper, they will eventually become bituminous grade coal. Coal is probably the only hydrocarbon that is entirely dependent on the long process of plate tectonics for its formation. That doesn't mean it is not being formed, only that it is a slow process.

      It's HOW we USE it, Collect it and transport it that is the issue.

      Currently natural gas is burned off of many field as the ways and means to collect it and distribute it still are lacking.

      Delete
  2. The guy in the first video Was living in what looked like a public health hazard. That's a really old video; I wonder what ever happened in that case.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I intentionally selected that video because the guy is eccentric and his place is a mess, but that is the point. That does not excuse provocative lawless behavior by government agents.

      Delete
    2. The Government should do whatever it needs to do to ensure that we all live non well-oiled green lives.

      Gaia gives, the government taketh away.

      Delete
    3. Being "eccentric," and wanting to live in a mess doesn't allow you to create a public health hazard, either.

      Look, I haven't always "played well with others," either; but society has to have basic rules. We can't have our kids dying of plagues just because some assholes want to live in filth, and squalor.

      Delete
    4. And, I doubt that the gal was being "lawless." If she could see something from the road that led her to think that public health was being compromised, I doubt that she really needed a warrant from a judge to investigate.

      Delete
    5. IF her fears were VALID how hard would it have been for her to go to a Judge and request a warrant?

      Could she see from the road, with telephoto lens and/or a fly over with a helicopter to gather the needed evidence?

      Could she produce electric company bills showing extremely high and not residential usage?

      IF her informant's claim was so credible?

      GO TO A JUDGE.

      Delete
  3. What type aircraft holds the current record for fastest single engine jet?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Teresita:

      Thought our computer nerd expert might know this one!

      Delete
    2. Bridgekeeper: What... is the air-speed velocity of an unladen swallow?

      King Arthur: What do you mean? An African or European swallow?

      Bridgekeeper: Huh? I... I don't know that. Aaaaaaauuuuuuuugggggghhh!!!!!

      Delete
    3. I wonder if Black Birds are faster than Caucasians?

      I know one Blackbird is, fer sure.

      Delete
  4. Don't remember if I posted this pic of The Kid at the start of a race at Hanalei Bay, Kaui

    Beautiful place.

    Should have taken the time to go there with my wonderful wife.

    One regret of many.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is, indeed, one of the most beautiful places that I'll probably never visit. Maybe the kids/grandkids will get the chance.

      Delete
    2. It's amazing to always see your feet and much more in the ocean here in most places.

      ...or at least it WAS before I became a too old old codger.

      Delete
    3. Been to Ha Why plenty of times back in Reagan's Navy. Nice place to visit, but I'd go nuts if I lived there. Too small. I like having Farmer Bob fully six hours away.

      Delete
    4. You mean you enjoy the drive?

      ...would be hard to resist a visit if one could get there w/o airfare.

      Delete
    5. "I like having Farmer Bob fully six hours away."

      :)

      Close enough to care, too far to be of any real concern.

      :)

      Delete
  5. IF her fears were VALID how hard would it have been for her to go to a Judge and request a warrant?

    Could she see from the road, with telephoto lens and/or a fly over with a helicopter to gather the needed evidence?

    Could she produce electric company bills showing extremely high and not residential usage?

    IF her informant's claim was so credible?

    GO TO A JUDGE.


    Right on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I imagine the law was written to spare Judges having to sign hundreds of "public health" warrants/day.

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    3. Hundreds????

      An excuse for everything.

      Ball-less wonder.

      Delete
  6. Lamar Alexander’s Taxpayer-Funded Campaign Monument

    If you want to understand everything that is wrong with the current crop of leaders in both parties, take a look at this story out of Nashville by local investigative reporter Ben Hall.

    Evidently, Lamar’s top campaign staffers were coordinating the creation of a traveling exhibit of Senator Alexander with the taxpayer-funded Tennessee State Museum. The exhibit, which would paint a acclamatory picture of the senior senator, was originally going to be deployed towards the end of this year and into 2014, to coincide with his reelection campaign…that is..until Ben Hall caught them in the act.

    The taxpayer-supported museum had been working with Alexander’s campaign on an exhibit that would travel across the state — while the senator was running for re-election.

    . . . please click here for the rest of the post →

    Seems like Republicrat Lamar's been in office since before I was born.

    I remember the Bastid running for POTUS, once.

    Conservative in name only.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. NPR is an arm of the DNC, but the Pubs are scared to defund it.

      Delete
  7. 40% Growth in Oil and Gas Jobs Since 2007

    Jobs in the oil and gas sector have grown 40 percent in the last five years, helping to counteract the tepid one percent increase in total U.S. employment.
    (Actually, Millions less employed, many more part time jobs.)

    The oil and natural gas industry created more than 162,000 jobs from 2007 to 2012 in drilling, extraction and support services, according to a report by the Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics released Friday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And people gotta live out of their cars in North Dakota, because houses are gold.

      Delete
  8. Elon Musk is unveiling his "Hyper-loop" idea this afternoon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think I read, somewhere, that one of the original plans for the NYC Subway was a kind of a modified vacuum tube idea.

      Delete
    2. Yeah, and we're supposed to have flying police cars by 2019.

      Delete
    3. Already got 'em - drones!

      Delete
  9. Answer: A Plane built in 1956!

    ...this link also has the story of how this historic craft met it's untimely demise.

    ***

    The F-106 emerged from the USAF's 1954 interceptor program of the early 1950s as an advanced derivative of the F-102 known as the "F-102B", for which the United States Air Force placed an order in November 1955. The aircraft featured so many modifications and design changes it became a new design in its own right, redesignated F-106 on 17 June 1956.[3]

    The F-102 had to be redesigned with an area ruled fuselage to achieve supersonic speed in level flight. To exceed Mach 2, the largely new F-106 featured a more powerful Pratt & Whitney J-75-P-17 afterburning turbojet with enlarged intake diameter to compensate for the increased airflow requirements and a variable geometry inlet duct, which allowed the aircraft improved performance particularly at supersonic speeds, as well as permitting a shorter inlet duct. The fuselage was cleaned up and simplified in many ways featuring a modified, slightly enlarged wing area and a redesigned vertical tail surface. The aircraft's exhaust nozzle featured a device known as an idle thrust reducer, which allowed taxiing without the jet blast blowing unsecured objects around, without adversely affecting performance at high thrust levels, including afterburners. The fuselage was also slightly longer than that of the F-102.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "At the moment I gently let the right wheel down, Edwards tower started giving me a running account of what was going on behind me. In a very calm voice it went something like this: "You have sparks coming from your right wheel". "Your right wheel is breaking up". "Your right wing is on fire". "The whole back of the aircraft is on fire, get out"! Unfortunately I was still doing about 75 knots when I got that last transmission and I did not have the 0-0 ejection seat so things immediately got very busy in the cockpit."

      ***

      Back in the days when men had balls of steel!

      Delete
  10. Speaking of "taking back the power:"

    Anyone who tells you wind power is expensive is bad-shit crazy. Wind power is the cheapest option for new electricity generation in many if not most places in the world, including much of the US. That would indeed help to explain why the US installed more wind power capacity than power capacity from any other source in 2012, 42% (or 43%?) of all new power capacity in the country.

    In announcing a recent report released by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and prepared by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), Berkeley Lab actually noted that, “The prices offered by wind projects to utility purchasers averaged $40/MWh for projects negotiating contracts 2011 and 2012, spurring demand for wind energy.”

    That’s $0.04 per kWh. Even if you add in the $0.022 Production Tax Credit (PTC), that’s $0.062 per kWh.

    As the reader who shared this with me aptly emphasized, “This is a low number. It’s not just the LCOE of wind. It includes real estate, transmission, taxes and profits. It’s the ‘delivered to the door’ cost of electricity, not just the generation price.”

    Read more at http://cleantechnica.com/2013/08/11/us-wind-power-prices-down-to-0-04-per-kwh/#20pi2brSe5C5lZFj.99

    Clickable

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm skeptical about that kWh price for ALL locations, but we shall see.

      Vast differences in price per location.

      Few sites better than Maui.

      ***

      Project to propel wind power to 16% of total

      Ground broken in Ulupalakua

      April 28, 2012
      By MELISSA TANJI - Staff Writer (mtanji@mauinews.com) , The Maui News

      ULUPALAKUA - When the Auwahi Wind project comes on line late this year, it will be "a building block for the future," Maui Electric Co. President Ed Reinhardt said Friday during the wind farm's Hawaiian blessing and groundbreaking ceremonies.

      Delete
  11. Replies
    1. ...and claim we're all about women's and gay rights!

      Sorry I'll miss out on the Sharia courts to come.

      Delete
    2. If Pat Robertson was in charge, that would be the penalty for flogging the bishop.

      Delete
    3. TeresitaMon Aug 12, 09:55:00 AM EDT
      The punishment for reading a Bible in the KSA.



      PUT A WARNING UP

      Delete
  12. We had a wonderful case out this way of an old guy who lived in a dump. So bad, that after he died the place was featured on American Picker. Old car bodies, fridges, stoves, aluminum sheets on and on you name it, about an acre or two of crap. Was really famous. Wonderful place for rattle snakes. Anyway, finally the city sued the guy to clean it up as a health hazard. Old man Martinson showed up to argue his case. I asked him once, in the grocery store, 'how are you today, Mr Martinson?' "None of your damned business' was the reply. About 5'2", one eye beaten in by the hooves of a horse, one eye looking up, the other sorta down, he cussed the government before the judge. No jury, judge ruling.

    Judge: "This is the kind of fellow that won the west. Case dismissed."

    :)

    True story.

    Idaho is a wonderful place. Ownership still means something.

    When old man Martinson finally died, American Pickers came in with the TV cameras.


    >>>American Pickers visits L.C. Valley to do some treasure hunting
    By Whitney Hise Published: Jun 19, 2012 at 4:37 PM PDT Last Updated: Jun 21, 2012 at 10:20 PM PDT

    0 Comments
    Print
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    American Pickers visits L.C. Valley to do some treasure hunting»PLAY VIDEO
    American Picker Mike Wolfe. Photo courtesy of KLEW viewer Edward Clark.
    LEWISTON, ID - Treasure hunting in the L.C. Valley may not seem like the most ideal location to find riches, but that's exactly what a national TV show is doing.

    "Ever since they've been on TV I have fell for them," said fan Mary Orr.

    The smash hit, American Pickers hit the back roads of the L.C. Valley Tuesday to find antiques and trash of value.

    "It's a small town," said fan Brian Neely. "We don't get a lot of the quote celebrities in Lewiston Idaho. It's nice to see them here."

    "I was really excited," said fan Tiara Smith. "In fact, we just found out about a half-an-hour ago and me and my friend jumped in the car and came straight down here to see them."

    American Pickers, Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz, dove through countless piles of junk, at the crossroads of 16th Avenue and 24th Street in Lewiston, with the optimism of finding antique trinkets that could be restored to their former glory.

    "They could find most anything, I mean we've already found dynamite, so who knows," said Neely.

    A number of American Picker fans stopped what they were doing to come and see the crew as they weeded through a lot for what they hoped to find, were hidden treasures.

    "I want to meet them," said Smith. "I watch the show all of the time, me and my husband. I just really want to meet them and see if I can get a signature or a couple of pictures."

    "Meeting them, that's been dream of mine ever since they've been on, you know, a fantasy," said Orr. "I never thought it could come true, and maybe, maybe it could come true."

    Both Wolfe and Fritz generally stick around to meet fans of the show. That is, after their done with their lot mission to recycle America.

    "I don't love them like I do my husband," said Orr. "But I love their program. I love when they go to some place and they explain this was used years ago for this. This is history, it is total history."

    The show aims to teach those who watch a thing or two about American history, while transforming one person's trash into another's treasure. No one was all that surprised by where the show selected to shoot their upcoming episode.

    "I'm not shocked because of the amount of stuff that's behind the fence," said Neely.

    If you're interested in being on American Pickers, you can email them with a description of your junk at americanpickers@cineflix.com.<<<


    http://www.klewtv.com/news/local/American-Picker-159645755.html

    Make CERTAIN to watch the video from on the scene!!!!

    (don't get snake bit)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies

    1. >>>>>"They could find most anything, I mean we've already found dynamite, so who knows," said Neely.<<<<<

      :):):):):)

      Delete
    2. Judge: "This is the kind of fellow that won the west. Case dismissed."


      :):):):):)

      Delete
    3. We met a hoarder in Atascadero, CA.

      Walking through his yard and house involved paths lined on both sides with stuff stacked to the ceilings!

      Old guy who came from Argentina.

      ...had a beautiful tall young blone for a girlfriend.

      Never figured out his secret.

      Or hers.

      Delete
    4. "blonde"

      he was not doubt well blone.

      Delete
  13. Deuce is getting tuned into a good site -

    August 12, 2013
    Mark Levin's The Liberty Amendments
    By Thomas Lifson
    American Thinker

    Keep up the good work, Deuce!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. .

    The American Thinker?

    Come on Deuce, you are better than that.

    :)

    .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was waiting for that. We consider all points of view!

      Delete
    2. I'm zipping my lip on others' posts from now on. :)

      Delete
  15. .

    As the nation approaches a milestone under Obamacare this October, Michigan is emerging as one of 10 states considered key for the law’s success nationwide.

    It is the intent of the Affordable Care Act to insure millions of Americans by expanding Medicaid and subsidizing low-cost insurance on the health exchanges. If it falls apart in Michigan and other states, it would affirm opponents’ contention that Americans don’t want government health care.

    Two national progressive groups — Americans United for Change and Protect Your Care — have formed a partnership to combat opponents of the health care law in Michigan and the swing states of North Carolina, Texas, Ohio, Wisconsin, Florida, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Illinois and Louisiana. The states either have ongoing battles over Medicaid expansion, such as in Georgia and Florida, or high numbers of uninsured like in Texas, said Lauren Weiner, national spokeswoman for the partnership.

    “We’re looking to states where we think enrollment is really important,” Weiner said.

    “And Medicaid expansion is a key component we’re going to push on when these legislatures come back in session.”



    From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130812/POLITICS02/308120031#ixzz2blVWILtV

    .

    ReplyDelete
  16. I think the idea of a Constitutional Convention that excludes Congress is fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fascinating, yes. But too scary. Doing Constitutional Amendments one by one seems better to this 'beware of the human race' person.

      A Constitutional Convention might end up selling off our National Forests, for instance, or giving them to the Chinese for debt reduction.

      You never know what might happen.....

      Delete
    2. .

      I have to agree with the backwoods lawyer (though it hurts).

      It's painful trying to get an amendment you like through, but then, that's the way it was designed. It also works the other way.

      Levine is a constitutional scholar but then so is Obama.

      .

      Delete
    3. The path towards truth is always painful, Quirk.

      Delete
  17. . . . . .

    The truth, however, was that this wasn’t the voice of experience talking; it was the voice of right-wing fantasy. Historically, stimulus programs — unlike social insurance programs, which do indeed have staying power — have shown no tendency at all to become permanent. No, the WPA didn’t endure into the Eisenhower years. And in fact the historical tendency is for stimulus to go away too soon.

    So let’s take a look at Obama-era spending. Obviously we want to deflate the spending, not just look at nominal amounts; and I’d argue that you really want to deflate by nominal GDP, so that we get a sense of how spending has changed relative to the amount the economy would be producing at full employment. So here’s federal spending as a percentage of potential GDP, as estimated by the Congressional Budget Office:

    . . . . .

    The always hysterically left Paul Krugman

    ReplyDelete
  18. Being consistent, I have to say if Cruz has only one citizen parent, he's not eligible to be President, just like Obama is not eligible to be President, regardless of where they were born. Cruz at least might make a decent President, and anyways we seem to have given up on such Constitutional niceties.



    >>>‘Was There A Birth Certificate?’: Trump Battles ABC’s Jon Karl Over Obama’s, Ted Cruz’s Citizenship
    by Evan McMurry | 9:51 am, August 11th, 2013 VIDEO» 486 comments




    Potential 2016 presidential contender Donald Trump spoke to ABC’s Jonathan Karl Sunday morning and reignited the birther issue that he helped spark back in 2011, questioning the legitimacy of Barack Obama’s birth certificate and wondering whether Ted Cruz, who was born in Canada, was eligible to president.

    “Was there a birth certificate?” Trump asked. “You tell me. Some people say that was not his birth certificate. I’m saying I don’t know. Nobody knows. And you don’t know, either, Jonathan. You’re a smart guy, you don’t know, either.”

    “I’m pretty convinced he was born in the United States,” Karl said.

    “Ah! Pretty convinced,” Trump said, and rolled over Karl’s objections that he was 100% sure Obama was an American citizen. “Pretty sure is not acceptable.”

    Trump made Obama’s birth certificate a major issue in his aborted 2012 run for the GOP nomination, ultimately leading to Obama releasing his longform birth certificate.

    Karl asked Trump if the Canadian-born Cruz was eligible for the office. (Cruz’s mother is an American citizen.)

    “If he was born in Canada, then perhaps not,” Trump said. “That will be ironed out. I don’t know the circumstances. If he says he was born in Canada, that’s his thing.”

    Watch the full clip below, via ABC News.<<<

    http://www.mediaite.com/tv/was-there-a-birth-certificate-trump-battles-abcs-jon-karl-over-obamas-ted-cruzs-citizenship/

    Trump is confusing the issue again.

    He should just run his businesses and shut up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. .

      Nonsense?

      Born in America, born in Canada? THAT is the nonsense.

      I content that he was cloned in a lab in Sweden from stem cells produced by a Canadian/American mutation called Ash.

      That's my story and I sticking to it.

      .

      Delete
  19. .

    Hannity gets bumped from primetime by leggy blonde.

    One airhead replaces another but the scenery improves.

    .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like the new scenery better too.

      Those leggy darlings on The Five have me hooked.

      Delete
    2. That Megan is a ballsy chick.

      Call me gay if you like, butt I'd fuck her.

      (if I could)

      Delete
    3. Oops, that would make me a Motherfucker.

      Delete
    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    5. Oops, I did it again.

      I'd do her if she had Megan's brain, looks and balls.

      If that makes me gay, so be it.

      Delete
  20. GREEN ROOM
    Tennessee judge rules family can’t name son “Messiah”
    POSTED AT 12:01 PM ON AUGUST 12, 2013 BY ED MORRISSEY


    In other words, get ready for the appeal:

    A judge in Tennessee changed a 7-month-old boy’s name to Martin from Messiah, saying the religious name was earned by one person and “that one person is Jesus Christ.”

    Child Support Magistrate Lu Ann Ballew ordered the name change last week,according to WBIR-TV. The boy’s parents were in court because they could not agree on the child’s last name, but when the judge heard the boy’s first name, she ordered it changed, too.

    “It could put him at odds with a lot of people and at this point he has had no choice in what his name is,” Ballew said.

    And here’s the oddest part of the story:

    Messiah was No. 4 among the fastest-rising baby names in 2012, according to the Social Security Administration’s annual list of popular baby names.

    I’d expect the ruling to get tossed just on those grounds. It’s hard to argue that the name was so unusual or bizarre that it required judicial intervention when the SSA’s data shows that it’s becoming more and more popular. Parents give kids stupid names on occasion, and the children either learn to embrace it or change it as soon as possible. Unless it’s a clearly abusive name — like, say, naming your son “Adolf Hitler” to perpetuate your own Nazi sympathies — a judge really doesn’t have any say in the naming process.

    Still, though, one has to wonder what parents are thinking when choosing “Messiah” as a name. These parents just thought it sounded nice with their other children, named Micah and Mason, but, er … doesn’t that set expectations just a wee bit high for the kid?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. .

      Perhaps the judge was jealous. She seems to think she's god.

      .

      Delete
    2. She not only nixed 'Messiah' but substituted her own choice, Martin, instead.

      She might be a damned Lutheran, you never know.

      Delete
    3. "Messiah" is a title.

      Can you name your kid "Ambassador"? Lord? King?

      Yeah...

      You have to wait til your born then you can send away to the Acme title company and get "reverend" or "president" or "doctor" added to your name

      Delete
    4. I wish I'd had Acme for Acne when I was a teen.

      Actually, I had the skin of a baby, and a face to match.

      the indignity.

      At least it served as my excuse for why I did not get laid when I attended Avenal Highschool.

      Delete
  21. So, what happened to the county official in the video, anything?

    According to a YouTube commenter:

    I'll tell you what happened. The homeowner was charged under county laws for illegal activity in a residential area. The reason he's crying and whining is because he's breaking the law, he knows it, and doesn't want to be held accountable. Happens all the time.

    So, for the record: Nothing happened to the government official, nor the cop. The owner was cited.

    Also: There's no such word as "uncomprehensible". Typical ignorance of these "sovereign" types. Too dumb to even speak proper English."


    note to boobie: Just because I read it on the internet doesn't make it true. Anybody know what fallout, if any, occurred from the 'trespass'?


    Bueller? Bueller?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What in hell are you talking about, Ash?

      You are incomprehensible.

      Delete
    2. All besides the point. They needed a warrant.

      Delete
    3. Hanging around here you will miss your tee off time.

      Begone!

      Delete
    4. As to any charges, the government can find something to charge anyone with at anytime. Since you took the trouble to research it , what were the illegal activities?

      Delete
    5. Ash doesn't 'get' the legal niceties, Deuce. And never will. Give it up. Waste of time, with Ash.

      Delete
    6. Out here, in the case I mentioned, with Mr. Mattheson/Martinson(?) it was a civil case, the question at issue being, what is an 'eyesore'.

      Judge held it's in the 'eye' of the beholder, so to speak, and let the old boy live out his days in peace and squalor, every American's right, especially those who 'won the west'.

      heh

      Delete
    7. All I know about it is by watching the video and reading the comments on YouTube (and here). The one guy at youtube said the chap was cited for violating county law and no punishment was meted out to the officer or the muni person. Is this true? Did those two violate the law and get punished? If they did get punished how so? The guy with the video camera was claiming he was going to get rich by suing them. I find that hard to believe as, generally, in a law suit you have to show real harm done and you can then get compensated for that harm plus, sometimes, extra money as 'punishment'.

      Did the muni worker get fired? Did the municipality get sued? or was the guy just flapping his gums?

      Delete
    8. DeuceMon Aug 12, 02:17:00 PM EDT

      All besides the point. They needed a warrant.



      Well, there are instances when they don't need a warrant. If an officer sees a crime in progress (i.e. an assault) they can enter. I really don't know what 'rights' municipal inspectors have to check stuff out which is why I am curious as to how the video tape situation played out.

      Delete
    9. AnonymousMon Aug 12, 02:20:00 PM EDT

      Ash doesn't 'get' the legal niceties, Deuce. And never will. Give it up. Waste of time, with Ash.






      and this from the boobie who thinks that wannabe neighborhood watchmen have a right to shoot to death kids in hoodies...

      Delete
  22. Whitey Bulger has gone down.

    Guilty
    Guilty
    Not Guilty
    Not Guilty
    Not Guilty
    Guilty
    Guilty
    Not Guilty
    Guilty
    Guilty
    Not Guilty
    Guilty
    No Finding
    Guilty
    Guilty
    Guilty
    Guilty
    Guilty
    etc, etc, can't keep up

    Looks like Whitey got a little sloppy during his career.

    Even bumped off a young girl he was molesting who called him 'Daddy'.

    Bye, bye, Whitey.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hey boobie,

    How come you haven't managed to get yourself logged in to google again? Those damn Windows 8 touch screen boxes keeping you from that elusive goal? Won't your daughter email you your username and password?

    ReplyDelete