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Wednesday, March 30, 2011

McCain and Lieberman vs McCain and Lieberman on Libya.



Did anyone notice the recent militancy of Lieberman and McCain over Libya? I wonder what happened?



Da Nang, Viet Nam 1965. Remember when…Hat Tip: Rufus:


Rufus II said...
The first Marines did an amphibious landing. Pretty cool. They came charging onto the beach M-14's at the ready.

The young gals met'em there, selling coca cola, and boom-boom.

Wed Mar 30, 08:16:00 PM EDT

171 comments:

  1. …and I win't even get into Lindsey Graham. Didn't he used to play with Fleetwood Mac?

    ReplyDelete
  2. And we get in deeper and deeper.


    President Obama has a signed a secret presidential finding authorizing covert operations to aid the effort in Libya where rebels are in full retreat despite air support from U.S. and allied forces, a source tells ABC News.

    The presidential finding discusses a number of ways to help the opposition to Moammar Gadhafi, authorizing some assistance now and setting up a legal framework for more robust activities in the future.

    The finding does not direct covert operatives to provide arms to the rebels immediately, although it does prepare for such a contingency and other contingencies should the president decide to go down that road in the future.

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  3. I know you are sick of me posting and talking about it, but this is madness, and not on my part.

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  4. Seriously am I the only one who finds it hysterical that this is the guy that was given a seat on the UN Human Rights Council and now the UN is passing resolutions authorizing air strikes in the hope insurgents take him down.

    You seriously cannot make this stuff up.

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  5. .

    Obama authorizes secret help for Libya rebels

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama has signed a secret order authorizing covert U.S. government support for rebel forces seeking to oust Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, government officials told Reuters on Wednesday.

    Obama signed the order, known as a presidential "finding", within the last two or three weeks, according to government sources familiar with the matter.

    Such findings are a principal form of presidential directive used to authorize secret operations by the Central Intelligence Agency. This is a necessary legal step before such action can take place but does not mean that it will.

    As is common practice for this and all administrations, I am not going to comment on intelligence matters," White House spokesman Jay Carney said in a statement. "I will reiterate what the president said yesterday -- no decision has been made about providing arms to the opposition or to any group in Libya."

    The CIA declined comment.


    Protect? Aid? What's the Difference?

    .

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  6. .

    Exclusive: Obama authorizes secret help for Libya rebels

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama has signed a secret order authorizing covert U.S. government support for rebel forces seeking to oust Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, government officials told Reuters on Wednesday.

    Obama signed the order, known as a presidential "finding", within the last two or three weeks, according to government sources familiar with the matter.

    Such findings are a principal form of presidential directive used to authorize secret operations by the Central Intelligence Agency. This is a necessary legal step before such action can take place but does not mean that it will.

    As is common practice for this and all administrations, I am not going to comment on intelligence matters," White House spokesman Jay Carney said in a statement. "I will reiterate what the president said yesterday -- no decision has been made about providing arms to the opposition or to any group in Libya."


    The CIA declined comment.

    Protect? Aid? What's the Difference?

    .

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  7. That is rich irony, anon. No, you are not alone in laughing at the lunacy.

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  8. .

    Blogger keeps eating my post on Obama authorizing aid to the rebels.

    So here,

    Protect? Aid? What's the Difference?

    .

    ReplyDelete
  9. We got started in Vietnam with 150 Special Forces "Advisors." Manly fellows. They gave JFK a Green Beret. Some asshole S/SGT (Barry Sadler?) wrote a song.

    fighting soldiers from the sky

    fearless men, who jump, and die

    men who mean, just what they say

    these are the men of the green beret



    It was all downhill from there.

    ReplyDelete
  10. .

    And from the WaPO,

    CIA operatives in Libya to gather intelligence on rebel fighters

    ...Such information has become more crucial as the administration and its coalition partners move closer to providing direct military aid or guidance to the disorganized and beleaguered rebel army. Officials said that, though no decision has been made, President Obama, in a covert finding, has authorized preparations to launch such an effort...

    CIA To Enter Libya

    Evidently, as in Vietnam, CIA Operatives are not considered troops.

    .

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  11. .

    Great minds Ruf.

    Your post went up as I was writing my last one.

    .

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  12. The first Marines did an amphibious landing. Pretty cool. They came charging onto the beach M-14's at the ready.

    The young gals met'em there, selling coca cola, and boom-boom.

    ReplyDelete
  13. .

    ..."In Gaddafi-controlled western Libya, government officials took journalists to meet the relatives of a boy who appeared to be the first confirmed civilian death in the 12-day old air war, in a village on the edge of Gharyan, a town about 60 miles south of Tripoli.

    According to family members, a coalition warplane struck an ammunition depot about three miles away on Tuesday, igniting a blaze that triggered a rocket that crashed into the home of 18-month-old Serajadin al-Suwaissi. The rocket only partially exploded, but a piece of burning shrapnel struck the boy’s head as he slept on the couch, and he died in a hospital about 12 hours later, the relatives said.

    “I am feeling angry about the airstrikes. This isn’t civilian protection at all,” said the boy’s uncle, Abdel Hakim al-Suwaissi, as somber women gathered in the home to pay condolences...


    In my recent letter to my Congressional Reps, I mentioned that the day the first innocent dies in Libya from allied bombing it will put to a lie Obama's claim of a humanitarian mission.

    What god complex gives any president the right to say that the lives of citizens in Benghazi are more important than the life of this boy sleeping in his bed?

    .

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  14. Rufu, I read that in the Stars and Stripes. We all had a good laugh over it:

    The USS Henrico, Union, and Vancouver, carrying the 9th Marine Expeditionary Brigade under Brig. Gen. Frederick J. Karch, take up stations 4,000 yards off Red Beach Two, north of Da Nang.

    First ashore was the Battalion Landing Team 3/9, which arrived on the beach at 8:15 a.m. Wearing full battle gear and carrying M-14s, the Marines were met by sightseers, South Vietnamese officers, Vietnamese girls with leis, and four American soldiers with a large sign stating: "Welcome, Gallant Marines." Gen. William Westmoreland, senior U.S. military commander in Saigon, was reportedly "appalled" at the spectacle because he had hoped that the Marines could land without any fanfare. Within two hours, Battalion Landing Team 1/3 began landing at Da Nang air base.

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  15. Rufus. I found the video and put it at the end of the post.

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  16. While President Obama has insisted that no American military ground troops participate in the Libyan campaign, small groups of C.I.A. operatives have been working in Libya for several weeks as part of a shadow force of Westerners that the Obama administration hopes can help bleed Colonel Qaddafi’s military, the officials said.

    In addition to the C.I.A. presence, composed of an unknown number of Americans who had worked at the spy agency’s station in Tripoli and others who arrived more recently, current and former British officials said that dozens of British special forces and MI6 intelligence officers are working inside Libya.

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  17. McCain and Lieberman - I loathe Lieberman. I'm not too fond of McCain either.

    If McCain had been smart, which he isn't, he would have selected Lieberman as his VP instead of the ditz Palin. They could have credibly claimed bipartisanship...

    ...anyway, they are both war mongering saps who think Israel can do no wrong.

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  18. .

    Great minds Ruf.

    Your post went up as I was writing my last one.


    Comment may be a little confusing. I see blogger also ate my 'last one'.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  19. .

    From the Wapo:

    CIA operatives enter Libya to gather intel

    The Obama administration has sent teams to gather intelligence on the identity, goals and progress of rebel forces, according to U.S. officials.

    CIA Enters Libya

    My previous comment was that as in Vietnam the CIA in Libya are evidently not considered 'ground troops'.

    .

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  20. It is my understanding that spotters on the ground are necessary for effective air force operations. Somehow I don't think they'd rely on locals for that.

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  21. The very first subject about which I blogged (BC) was the question of whether a Jew could serve a patently duplicitous and/or potentially diabolic administration with reference to the ME, specifically Hamas. A couple EB hangers-on attacked me for such unpatriotic sentiments, being themselves alleged veterans. Now, I learn that a good man, the late Barry Sadler, albeit as naive as were we all, was an "asshole" - this from one of my hyper-patriotic protagonists. How far have we fallen...pathetic...but predictable…

    I served with 1/9, MOS – 0311. I, too am an “asshole”, and proud of the company.

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  22. I was wondering about that, Q. :)


    The old talking military heads on Fox have been saying for days that we had "laser designators"/Air Controllers on the ground.

    You're right, Ash. Any Air operations in Urban areas are going to require U.S. Military on the ground.


    Welll, maybe CIA could do it . . . . but . . . . .

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  23. Well, shit. I give up.

    Okay, he was a "peach" of a fellow. Wonderful singer. Role Model. Cut a dashing figger in his uniform. Wore his "beret" at a cocky, and dashing angle. Steely-eyed. And, a Suuuuuperb Musician.

    Happy?

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  24. Mighta even been Cherokee (he was handsome enough.)

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  25. You're a pain in the ass, Allen. But, I believe you mentioned a couple of purple hearts at An Kha.

    (The 1st Battalion/9th Marines took the most casualties of any Battalion in Marine Corps History.)

    If you survived This Mashup I have to give you your due. Operation Buffalo

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  26. The War Powers Act explicitly restricted the President's ability to commit troops to combat. This implicitly rescinds all earlier grants of power to the President allowing him to send troops into combat, unless specifically exempted by the War Powers Act. There was no such exemption.

    As it turns out, however, this doesn't matter. If you read the UN Participation Act (section 6), you'll find that the President's ability to order troops into combat under UN security council resolution only ever applied to troops which Congress had already appropriated for UN peacekeeping operations.

    So as it turns out, Obama's action wouldn't have been legal even before the War Powers Act was implemented -- he has committed military forces that weren't authorized for UN service.

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  27. Now, I was forced to Wiki Barry Sadler. Interesting life, worth a google.

    While serving in the Vietnam War, he was severely wounded in the knee by a feces-covered punji stick while leading a patrol in the Central Highlands of Vietnam, southeast of Pleiku in May 1965. At the time, Sadler was on an antibiotic for dysentery, so no major ill effects from the punji stick were seen. He used only a cotton swab and an adhesive bandage while finishing the patrol. But later, Sadler developed a major infection of the leg, sending him home. During dangerous surgery, Sadler's doctors found themselves forced to enlarge the wound in order to drain it and administer penicillin. While he was recovering in the hospital, Sadler heard Robert F. Kennedy dedicating the new JFK Center for Special Warfare at Fort Bragg. At that moment, Sadler promised himself that if his leg successfully fought off the infection, which it eventually did, he would give away the rights to his song.

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  28. The Libyans are learning fast. They have parked the tanks and APC's and have mounted AA guns in Toyota pick-ups. They now blend in with the rebels effectively diminishing NATO's air advantage. That will cause mistakes in targeting and air strikes will become increasingly unpopular as collateral damage increases. We have learned nothing and are getting sucked into this.

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  29. Yes, we Sure were naive.

    But, not for long.

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  30. Our "Leaders, and Masters," however, seem to be carrying on the "Traditione de Naivete."


    This has potential to end in Farce.

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  31. In the late seventies when the monarchy was overthrown in Afghanistan, central authority collapsed and tribal warfare broke out into a civil war. The Russians had advisors on the ground, probably a few hundred to a thousand and they got caught up in the fighting and took casualties. The Soviets thought they would supplement the advisors with air power and troops on the ground. That was the beginning of the thirty year war in Afghanistan.

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  32. You know your war's not going well when your unit is referred to as The Walking Dead

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  33. The CIA advisors will be mostly ex-military and will be meeting with the rebels to determine the situation on the ground. Not one in ten will speak the language beyond a six month language school. Their analysis will determine how deeply we get involved. Now if you drop 50, 100 macho hyper-adventure addicted specialists into Libya and ask them what they need to get this done? Do you think they will answer "Get out of Dodge." The deal is already fixed. The temptation will be to kill Ghaddafi as if that will make a difference as there are hundreds of ambitious ruthless men willing to jump onto his place.

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  34. EPA Says Radiation Found in U.S. Milk...


    Watch your spinach.

    a/bakadwr

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  35. The Iowa Guardsmen, members of the 185th Air Refueling Wing, based in Sioux City, deployed Saturday. Iowa Guard officials wouldn’t release the number of airmen or airplanes that deployed, citing security concerns.

    ...

    Nebraska and Iowa Guard officials said it’s unclear how long the troops will be deployed, in part because NATO is taking control of the Libyan airstrikes mission previously led by the United States.

    ...

    One of the Sioux City wing’s eight aircraft returned Wednesday from a mission flying wounded troops from Afghanistan to Germany. The airplane was reconfigured for the mission, which lasted about three weeks.


    NE/IA Units

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  36. As I stated, I've been bemused, and bewildered by this operation from the start.

    Some Wars you can almost understand - even in Arabia. But this one? It's just been a puzzlement from the get-go.

    It's about oil, of course; but why are/were the rebels seen as better suppliers than Quddafi?

    What made it worthwhile? Was it just some kind of opportunistic "jumping on of the bandwagon" when the Rebels looked like a cinch?

    Was it just an attempt to hurry up and "get it over with, and get the oil back to flowing?"

    Was Quddafi preparing to sell the Fwenchie's oil to the Chinee?

    This ones definitely over my pay grade.

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  37. Something was up with France. They wanted to go a long time ago. First ones calling for it. On the edge of going alone.

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  38. Some politicians have some guts. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul fiercely attacked President Obama on the Senate floor Wednesday, accusing the White House of hypocrisy for “cavalierly taking us to war’’ with Libya without first gaining congressional consent.

    “I think it’s a mistake,’’ Paul said. “I think it’s a travesty, and I think it should end.’’

    Paul noted that the action in Libya represents the third war the country is engaged in while “struggling under an enormous debt.’’

    I don't know about the rest of you, but I am getting tired of paying to be the World's police force. I am also tired of the, "it's the decent, moral ( insert whatever ) thing to do " argument. It seems as though half of the world cannot stand us until they need something, then it is " why aren't they helping us ". Sorry, just sad to see Americans losing their lives for no reason.

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  39. Re: Walking Dead

    That depends on whether you are on the receiving end of the scythe. There is a reason we hold the record in the Corps for the most KIA on any unit, we gave as good as we got. That's why I earned three (3) purple hearts. Widows were made in the process.

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  40. http://www.temehu.com/Libyan-People.htm

    Tribes of Libya

    You quessed it Qadafi is from the Qadafi tribe.

    140 tribes

    We know what we are doing!

    a/bakadwr

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  41. Isn't that also the Largest Tribe?

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  42. Dictator Got You Down?

    Call Barack About Our Regime Change Specials

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  43. Captain Fox was my company commander at one point. The silly man came out of retirement to serve again in Vietnam. He took a grazing round to the right tricep. His runner was awarded the Bronze Star with "V" for applying a field dressing ... such is life :-)

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  44. Barook has the "hoping" down pat, now; he seems to be having a little problem with the "change," though. :)

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  45. The US is likely to be in breach of the UN security council's arms embargo on Libya if it sends weapons to the rebels, experts in international law have warned.

    After Hillary Clinton said it would be legal to send arms to support the uprising, lawyers analysing the terms of the UN's 26 February arms embargo said it would require a change in the terms for it not to breach international law.

    With that said, arming is a stupid idea - what are you going to do give them machine guns and RPG's? If you look at the news they are already armed up and have enough ammunition to fire at will in the air!!! This will be a protracted and costly campaign by the west where neither side will win in Libya. The Russians and Chinese will take all the oil contracts 'under the radar' while we are distracted by headlines.

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  46. the Bard of MurdockWed Mar 30, 11:20:00 PM EDT

    I heard someone with a British accent on MSNBC saying that Tunisia and Egypt may have to deal with a refugee crisis if Gaddafi is unchecked.

    Well, that's too bad for Tunisia and Egypt but I don't see why it's our problem.

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  47. Then, there's this CNN: U.S. Changing Strategy to All-Out Attack on Khaddafi Forces

    Gonna bomb Tripoli. Haven't we "been" bombing Tripoli? Steve Harrigan, on Fox, reports every night of multiple explosions, presumably from Tomahawks.


    Does anyone have a program?

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  48. I think the Qadafi tribe is the largest tribe, yup.

    Some of these tribes seem to have been imported by the arabs sometime in the past to help in islamizing the area.

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  49. I'm sure the CIA agents going into Libya REALLY appreciate the morons at the White House who leaked they were going in.

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  50. I just read two secret reports today.

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  51. This is all okay, though. The Saudis are going to break out all that "Spare Capacity" any day now - prolly tomorrow, for sure.


    They contacted Halliburton, and some other drillers yesterday, and put in a "Rush" order for 30 More Drilling Rigs. Need'em Right Now, they said. Oops.

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  52. I thought you quit watching Fox, Rufus?

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  53. Worried about Lybia? How about next door? We have beheadings/mass graves/murder of men, women and childern in the streets in Mexico, 2000 in Acapulco.

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  54. Wikileaks revealing anything secret yet?

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  55. Old habits die hard, Sam.

    I usually watch Special Report (although the "panel" drives me to distraction,) and Shep Smith covers most of the news in an entertaining way (I used to love that bear falling out of the tree onto the trampoline,) and I think Greta is one of the better interviewers out there.

    Mostly, I guess, it's just habit. :)

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  56. Yeah, where's wikileaks when we need'em.

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  57. Ash said...
    McCain and Lieberman - I loathe Lieberman. I'm not too fond of McCain either.

    If McCain had been smart, which he isn't, he would have selected Lieberman as his VP instead of the ditz Palin. They could have credibly claimed bipartisanship...

    ...anyway, they are both war mongering saps who think Israel can do no wrong.




    Go fuck yourself ash...

    How's that?

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  58. Kuwait's cabinet is expected to quit Thursday after lawmakers asked to grill three ministers, the latest in a series of challenges by an unusually assertive Arab parliament that have delayed important economic reforms, Reuters reported.
    Kuwait's parliament, the most outspoken in a Gulf region mostly dominated by ruling families, has triggered numerous cabinet resignations or reshuffles through questionings.


    Government Set To Quit

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  59. Damn, Ash, they're coming down off the bleachers to tell you to go fuck yourself. Must'a been somethin you said.

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  60. AUSTRALIAN-CHINESE pro-democracy activist Yang Hengjun has spoken to his family and friends to say he is OK , three days after he disappeared amid fears he had been detained by Chinese authorities.

    ...

    The situation is complicated by the fact that this agreement operates only if the detained person is travelling on an Australian passport. If Dr Yang was travelling under another passport or identification card, the consular agreement does not apply.

    On Tuesday, China charged two more activists for "inciting subversion" amid the widening crackdown, which some say is the harshest since the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests.


    'Held In Hospital'

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  61. Well, the sooner I go to bed the sooner I can bollox up another day. g'nite all.

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  62. .

    Some Wars you can almost understand - even in Arabia. But this one? It's just been a puzzlement from the get-go.

    Just a guess on my part (who can really tell with these guys) but I believe Libya is an example of the U.S. trying to get "back in the game" with regard to their foreign polcy in the ME.

    Let's face it, the U.S. was looking pretty flummuxed after Egypt. Initially, Hillary declares the Mubarack government stable. A week latter, as the demonstrations continue, the U.S. calls for reforms. Then when it's evident the Egyptian military is not going to support Mubarack, the U.S. says he "must" go.

    Then after pompously affirming our commitment to 'universal rights', we are embarrassed when our staunch "allies" (Saudi, Bahrain, Yemen, etc.) start cracking down on dissidents in their own countries that are demanding the same 'universal rights".

    So looking for something, anything that would make U.S. foreign again look relevant in the ME, they are suddenly presented Libya.

    Why not? Ghaddafi based on his past performance has zero friends. You need the Arab League on board? No problem. Heck, Mohammar has been accused of paying for the assassination attempt on Abdullah of SA. He publicly insulted the leader of Quatar (one of the only two Arab countries to send token planes to Libya). He admitted culpability in the Lockerbie bombing. France and Britain were already politicing for taking him down. He had no air force. You would be sending state of the art technology against a second rate state being run by a tribal cheiftain. And with the Big Mo opening his mouth, you have a built in "humanitarian" excuse for going in and hopefully taking the world's attention away from our other failures in the ME.

    What could possibly go wrong>

    .

    What could possibly go wrong.

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  63. .

    ...Shep Smith covers most of the news in an entertaining way (I used to love that bear falling out of the tree onto the trampoline,)...

    Classic.

    I loved that bear.

    .

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  64. AN ALLEGED mastermind of the 2002 Bali bombings that killed more than 200 people has been arrested in Pakistan

    Umar Patek, a high-profile member of the al-Qaida-linked group Jemaah Islamiah (JI), is wanted in a string of countries including Australia, the United States and Indonesia.

    ...

    He is also believed to have previously trained in Afghanistan and Pakistan during the 1980s and 1990s.


    Arrested In Pakistan

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  65. .

    They contacted Halliburton, and some other drillers yesterday, and put in a "Rush" order for 30 More Drilling Rigs. Need'em Right Now, they said. Oops.

    Come on Rufus, you keep making me do this. I don't follow this stuff closely at all; but just from stuff I pick up on CNBC I know that SA has about 70 oil fields with proven reserves that are sitting idle.

    The Obama accuses the oil industry of sitting on their oil leases in order to drive up prices (or keep them high); yet it's the Obama administration that won't give them the permits to actually drill the oil on those leases (especially in the Gulf).

    If I read your post correctly, you are implying that the current high oil prices are due to lack of supply. Other than you and the Obama administration, I think most people probably understand that the current high prices are driven primarily by speculation centered on geopolitical events.

    You use production numbers over the past few years to point to 'peak oil'. While there is no argument about peak oil, I will argue that oil production has been down over that time period because demand has been down.

    I've given you examples of the numbers in previous posts.

    .

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  66. In China, the Canadian oil, which can be dirtier to process and burn, will not be handled as sensitively as in the United States.

    America can use its own resources and the oil from Canada to transition to a cleaner energy future, and do so without impoverishing its people with crushing fuel prices.

    But first the president must accept that energy independence doesn't have to mean independence from oil.


    'Foreign' Oil

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  67. I think most people probably understand that the current high prices are driven primarily by speculation centered on geopolitical events.




    and the ON Purpose weak devalued dollar..

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  68. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  69. Bill Gross, who runs the world’s biggest bond fund at Pacific Investment Management Co., said Treasuries “have little value” because of the growing U.S. debt burden.

    ...

    Gross said in an interview March 11 that he eliminated government-related debt from his Total Return Fund because investors aren’t being adequately compensated for the risk of quickening inflation.

    ...

    Pimco’s record $236.9 billion Total Return Fund gained 7 percent in the past year, beating 82 percent of its competitors, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The company is a unit of insurer Allianz SE in Munich.


    Echoing Buffet

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  70. Natalie Holloway murder suspect, Joran van der Sloot, has been ominously quiet for quite a while. That's not surprising since he's been languishing in Peru's Miguel Castro Castro prison since June awaiting the completion of the investigation of Stephany Flores's murder. On January 15th however, Van der Sloot suddenly decided to lunge back into the headlines by stabbing a guard and then attempting to hold him hostage in a crazy, and therefore unsuccessful attempt to break out of prison.

    According to the National Enquirer, Van der Sloot suddenly "freaked out" when guard, Luis Gavancho, brought a tray of food into his cell. Joran threw the tray against the wall, and when Gavancho tried to subdue him, he stabbed the prison guard in the face with a homemade "shiv." When other guards arrived on the scene, they found Joran holding the bloody Gavancho in a choke hold while "wielding the knife in his free hand." Needless to say, Joran was overpowered and his escape attempt foiled.

    And what on earth could have prompted the accused murderer to think he could fight his way out of the infamous Peruvian prison with a bleeding hostage and a homemade shiv? Cocaine, of course. Or as one source explained:

    "In his drugged state, he probably imagined he could hold the guard hostage and maybe escape." Right.

    Latin American prisons bear notorious reputations for alleged substandard conditions and even human rights violations. If daily life for Miguel Castro prison's regular inmates is pure hell, imagine how horrific it must be for those who have been consigned to the "hole" for punishment. Like Joran van der Sloot.

    And it couldn't happen to a more deserving guy.

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  71. Libyans killed nearly 300 innocent people over Lockerbie dont forget.

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  72. Blogger Deuce said: "The Libyans are learning fast. They have parked the tanks and APC's and have mounted AA guns in Toyota pick-ups. They now blend in with the rebels effectively diminishing NATO's air advantage. "

    About half the local population of Sirte belongs to Gaddafi’s tribe, the Gadhadhfa, and the area surrounding Sirte, Gaddafi’s stronghold. Gaddafi’s hold over his tribe is strong. It is populated with enemies of the "rebels", and not just Gaddafi’s soldiers.

    Gaddafi has long felt threatened by forces inside and outside Libya and he has always looked to his own tribe, blood relatives, as the most likely people to protect him.

    If Sirte falls to the rebels, what happens next is anyone's guess. So far, much of the coverage of the battle has been portrayed as a fight between freedom-seeking rebels and a dictator. It is not, it is tribal war and not a revolution.

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  73. Heard the first comparisons to Reagan, Nicoland and the Boland Amendment.

    Speculation was that if the Congress acted in a similar manner, with Obama and Libya, then the Sauds with step up with the funding for US operations.

    Reagan used the Iranian Islamists, Obama will use the Sauds.
    The more things change, the more they stay the same.

    I expect that some posters will be calling those CIA operative murderers, before to much more time goes by.

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  74. It does seem that there has been very little change within the Federal government since the election of BH Obama.

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  75. Qaddafi leads coup and takes power in Libya.

    Qaddafi sponsored terrorist bombings in Germany and of Pan Am Lockerbie.

    When US invaded Iraq, he tried to encourage a pan Arab uprising against the US and NATO allies. Finding little support from his Arab neighbors, he bitterly made a deal with the Bush II administration for "immunity". As a reward for "good behaviour," Libya was given a position on the UN Human Rights council.

    Qaddafi's son, Saif, began attempting institutional and human rights reforms in Libya. The results were minimal.

    He struck a deal with Britain so that BP could benefit from Libyan oil and Qaddafi's chief Loberie operative would remain silent about Qaddafi's complicity.

    Everything was hunky dory until the
    Arab Spring brought uprising to Libya. Qaddafi reverted to bellicose strong-man thug and threatened "rivers of blood" as the whirled media moved in to document the coming massacres. Sarkozy shamed the US and the UN about their former UN poster child for reform. Obama was forced to act.

    The cluster stoop continues.

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  76. The whole whirled is a cluster stoop and the only way to avoid it is to completely avoid "foreign entanglements". Is that possible? It may have been at one time, but since 1900 we've certainly "stepped in it."

    We're covered up in "stink" while the thugs China and Russia are smelling like roses.

    Life ain't fair.

    ReplyDelete
  77. Moussa Koussa, high-profile Lockerbie spymaster

    Moussa Koussa, the Libyan foreign minister who defected from Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's regime, was one of the architects of its rehabilitation in the international community but a deeply controversial figure who is likely to pose David Cameron a particularly thorny political problem.

    He was expelled from London in 1980 after giving an extraordinary newspaper interview when he was the head of the embassy in which he said two Libyan dissidents living in London would be killed.

    Speaking outside the Libyan embassy in St James’s Square, Mr Koussa told The Times: “The revolutionary committees have decided last night to kill two more people in the United Kingdom. I approve of this."

    He returned to Libya after being given 48 hours to leave the UK, where he was accused of funding terrorist groups.

    Mr Kousa was named by intelligence sources in the mid-1990s as the possible architect of the 1988 bombing of Pan Am flight 103, which killed 270 people, and the blowing up the following year of a French airliner in central Africa in which 170 people died
    Mr Koussa, who is now 61, travelled to Britain to meet British and Scottish government officials on at least two occasions as Mr Megrahi’s health deteriorated.

    On October 27 last year, at the first meeting after Megrahi’s cancer diagnosis, Mr Koussa is listed as an interpreter. At the second meeting in January, he is given the then correct title of Minister of Security. In March he was promoted out of the shadows to foreign minister.

    ReplyDelete
  78. While the world’s attention is focused on the combat transpiring in Libya and the events in Egypt and Bahrain, Yemen has also descended into crisis. The country is deeply split over its support for Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, and this profound divide has also extended to the most powerful institutions in the country — the military and the tribes — with some factions calling for Saleh to relinquish power and others supporting him.

    ...

    The raid on the arms factory in Jaar was facilitated by the fact that government security forces had been forced to focus elsewhere. Reports indicate that there was only a company of Yemeni troops in Jaar to guard the factory and that they were quickly overwhelmed by the militants.

    ...

    In late 2009, in the wake of the Christmas Day plot to destroy Northwest Airlines Flight 253, the Fort Hood shootings and the attempted assassination of the Saudi deputy interior minister, STRATFOR believed that 2010 was going to see a concerted effort by the Yemenis to destroy the AQAP organization. As 2010 passed, it became clear that, despite the urging and assistance of their U.S. and Saudi allies, the Yemenis had been unable to cause much damage to AQAP as an organization, and as evidenced by the Oct. 29, 2010, cargo-bomb attempt, AQAP finished 2010 stronger than we had anticipated.


    Vacuum Of Authority

    ReplyDelete
  79. Now that we are getting conned into the third concurrent war, what of the fourth fifth and sixth? Do they bacome less worthy or more? Will the humanitarian demands be less compelling?

    ReplyDelete
  80. Lieberman on your clip basically said we're going into Syria if Assad fires on his own people.

    ReplyDelete
  81. I am more and more convinced this is a prelude orchestrated to get us into Iran.

    ReplyDelete
  82. I seriously doubt that, Deuce.

    We're reacting to events...not planning them.

    ReplyDelete
  83. Although, rat is convinced that we've got everybody right where we want them.

    ReplyDelete
  84. The Neo-Cons and liberals are coalescing.

    ReplyDelete
  85. Lies, hypocrisy and hidden agendas. This is what United States President Barack Obama did not dwell on when explaining his Libya doctrine to America and the world.

    ...

    Pentagon supremo Robert Gates said this weekend, with a straight face, there are only three repressive regimes in the whole Middle East: Iran, Syria and Libya. The Pentagon is taking out the weak link - Libya.

    ...

    NATO's master plan is to rule the Mediterranean as a NATO lake. Under these "optics" (Pentagon speak) the Mediterranean is infinitely more important nowadays as a theater of war than AfPak.


    War Business

    ReplyDelete
  86. Well whit, I read for years that the US was "At War with Islam".

    I know that all these little countries are "fabrications" of "the West". The natives did not draw the lines on the map creating those countries.

    The lines were drawn to create "unstable" political entities. It certainly was the British technique, to play one tribal group against the other in the effort to maintain British control. Best exemplified in Iraq, but practiced by the Brits everywhere they held sway.

    The French and Italians practiced the same techniques, on a lesser scale. The Romans, as Ms T says, used a different Imperial technique.

    Looking at the situation from a nonpartisan perspective the US was threatened by State sponsors of terror. Now, those States are destabilized. The US is not.

    There is only "one" war, it does have many fronts across the Islamic Arc. The US cannot win that war without expanding it to where the enemy is.

    Libya was and remains a State Sponsor of Terror. Its government, a legitimate target.

    It is about time we take that Colonel down.

    ReplyDelete
  87. The US has shown that it can prosecute a war, without US troops.

    We did it in Nicaragua. Since then we have greatly expanded our capacity to use mercenaries. This was well exemplified in Iraq where we employee both Iraqis and US citizens as "Security Contractors".

    Blackwater, or whatever its current name is, can certainly fill the training and advisor needs of the Libyan rebels, without putting US troops on the ground.

    The US is way ahead, if there is a "Clash of Civilizations".

    ReplyDelete
  88. Blogger Rufus II said...

    " As I stated, I've been bemused, and bewildered by this operation from the start.

    Some Wars you can almost understand - even in Arabia. But this one? It's just been a puzzlement from the get-go.

    It's about oil, of course; but why are/were the rebels seen as better suppliers than Quddafi? "

    I agree it is about Oil, but more as a back drop. In Frances case the civil war pretty stopped the Libyan oil shipments and, I believe, Libyan oil represents 15% of Frances imports. France needs the situation resolved pronto.

    With respect to the US involvement I think Deuce and Quirk have it about right. The ME is in big flux and, as Whit said, we are reacting to events and not driving them and the administration is trying to get on the 'right' side of events i.e. though a stable oil supply is important supporting brutal dictators isn't (I guess the Sauds are benign warm and cuddly dictators - sort of like a bear on a tramp?). The Deuce part, by the way, that I was referring to above is the natural bedfellows the NeoCons and Liberals are (note the capital L on Liberal).

    p.s. Why put US troops on the ground to spot when you can follow Bush's lead and just use mercenaries...ummm *cough* *cough* ummm "contractors"?

    ReplyDelete
  89. The finding that Mr Obama may have signed could well indicate that we are on the path blazed by Mr Reagan, Mr Casey and Colonel North.

    ReplyDelete
  90. The US is way ahead, if there is a "Clash of Civilizations".

    Perhaps in one sense, but the hypocrisy and the cost are galling.

    I guess in a world of realpolitik (or neocon professed idealism) most ignore the hypocrisy. However, the cost (in terms of lives and treasure) is another thing and likely doesn't justify the expansion of Bush's 'war on terror' by another U.S. president.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  91. 'cept didn't they fund the operations through sales to Iran? In this case, it seems, the US is funding it out of general revenues (well, borrowings).

    ReplyDelete
  92. That is true, ash, but the talk on MSNBC was that if the US Congress followed the Boland Amendment course, the Sauds would step up and fund the operations.

    We'll see what happens, but all of this has precedent.

    ReplyDelete
  93. War is worthy of debt.

    I used to read how the "Clash" was the equivalent of WWIII or WWIV.

    Anyone that believes that "Islam is the problem" should support this US action, in Libya.

    It is just a few pixels in the "big picture".

    ReplyDelete
  94. It may be that either the Sauds or the Egyptians could supply those rebels with trainers.

    Both have armies that are capable, of that.

    ReplyDelete
  95. I just saw Mr Gates say that "someone else" should arm those Libyan rebels.

    Sounds like Egypt or Saudi Arabia, to me.

    ReplyDelete
  96. Just what arms are they lacking? I haven't seen anything smaller thatn a 50 caliber on a pickup truck and everyone else seems to have an AK 47. Carry something bigger and you'll get hit with a cruise missile.

    ReplyDelete
  97. 105mm howitzers, TOWs.

    From the reports I've seen the rebels need trainers. Though they also seem to lack enough light arms to "go around".

    ReplyDelete
  98. .

    War is worthy of debt.

    Jesus rat, you just keep shovelling it.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  99. Need trainers? An employment opportunity for the Rat. Some here would buy the ticket.

    ReplyDelete
  100. Well, Q, most of the posters, here at the EB, have said that Islam is an existential threat to the US.

    Anyone that believes that is the case should not be disturbed by the low cost of the Libyan operation.

    Now, I would agree that we have wasted a great deal of money in both Iraq and Afghanistan, but the expansion of the War on State Sponsors of Terror into Libya is a low cost operation, especially if one of our proxies supplies the trainer/advisers.

    ReplyDelete
  101. Not a chance, anon, I do not have the language skills, for Libya.
    To old to learn.

    Besides, I've retired from that line of work.

    ReplyDelete
  102. For most of the past decade the refrain I have read:

    Faster Please!

    Now that action is being delivered, partisanship extends beyond the shoreline.

    Just as it did during GW Bush's tenure.

    ReplyDelete
  103. ...the expansion of the War on State Sponsors of Terror into Libya is a low cost operation...

    Come on rat.

    You earlier estimated that the cost was $200 million and would be cheap. You then posted a Forbes article that said the cost to date was $550 million. If you think the costs will stop there, I worry about you.

    Going into Irag, some official indicated the cost would be a couple bilion, the high end estimate was $40-50 billion.

    War was profitible for the Romans. They fed and paid for their empire for a few hundred years by conquest.

    When you start talking about accumulating debt where no national interests are involved, you have to admit Obama is no Augustus.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  104. I think, Q, if you went back and found the post, you'd see I said $500 million.

    Given the cost of the Tomahawks and the price of the jet that went down.

    But if you are right, and I said $200, then I was wrong. Even so $500 million is as nothing, compared to the price of the rest of the War on State Sponsors of Terror.

    Libya deserves to be destabilized.
    It is a State Sponsor of Terror.

    We are doing the right thing, there. Especially if we use proxies to train and equip the rebels.

    It would be a mistake to insert US troops into the conflict, but it appears as if we will not.

    ReplyDelete
  105. Libya deserves to be destabilized.
    It is a State Sponsor of Terror.


    Is that what you think or just what you feel?

    The statement seems to indicate that destabilizing Libya will make it somehow 'less' a haven for terrorists.

    There are those including myself that would argue just the opposite.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  106. It is the origin of debt, war is. The historian Niall Ferguson has a real good book on it. The use of debt can be quite beneficial. "The Cash Nexus" is a good book if you are interested in the history of money...and debt...and power.

    ReplyDelete
  107. He also notes how war debt can collapse an empire, well nations anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  108. Blogger hannah said...

    I think most people probably understand that the current high prices are driven primarily by speculation centered on geopolitical events.




    and the ON Purpose weak devalued dollar..




    is amazing how fickle value for money can be, historically. Tulip bulb anyone? How about some Florida real estate - nice marsh eh?

    ReplyDelete
  109. Terrorists, without a State sponsor, are meaningless, Q

    Definitely not an existential threat to the US.
    They are just criminals.

    If the aQ elements in Libya are engaged against the Colonel, that is good for US.

    As written in the Story of "o", it is time to enjoy the show and munch on popcorn, the price of the ticket is low enough.

    ReplyDelete
  110. If we could get the Sauds to engage, in Libya, then it'd be even better

    Bleed 'em all.

    ReplyDelete
  111. Terrorists, without a State sponsor, are meaningless, Q

    Again, I would argue with you.

    Terrorists don't need Libya as a sponsor. Terrorists need Libya (or some other country) as a safe haven. Without a safe haven they are meaningless.

    There are plenty of other state and private sources of funds for the terrorists.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  112. .

    Bleed 'em all.

    My provide catharsis but on a practical level what would we gain from it?

    .

    ReplyDelete
  113. Terrorists, Q, without a State sponsor are Mohamed and Malvo.

    McVeigh and his partner, whose name escapes me at the moment

    Mexican drug cartels.

    Criminals, to be sure.
    Dangerous, without doubt.

    They do not approach the level of an existential threat to the US.

    ReplyDelete
  114. We gain the destabilization of the enemy. We get them fighting amongst themselves.

    Changing the focus of their attention.

    As this piece from the Asia Times illustrates.

    ReplyDelete
  115. Oil is up #2.00 - Gas is up a Nickel.

    A little $3.80 Gasoline coming to a pump near you.



    Oh, wait . . . .

    I forgot; the Sauds are going to open up 70 New Fields!

    Any day, now.

    LOL

    ReplyDelete
  116. Just like they opened'em up in July 2008.

    Uh, . . . . never mind

    ReplyDelete
  117. .

    We gain the destabilization of the enemy. We get them fighting amongst themselves.

    Again you assume what will come after will be better.

    Reports already abound about the terrorist affiliations of some of these 'dissidents'.

    Or if you don't assume that, you are willing to pay billions for a respite.

    Sounds equivalant to the U.S. paying tribute to those Libyan pirates again regardless of what we call it.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  118. .

    I forgot; the Sauds are going to open up 70 New Fields!

    Once again, you miss or ignore the point.

    There is no shortage of oil right now. The high prices are the result of speculation, geopolitical risk, and as the other gentlemen pointed out, the weakness of the U.S. dollar.

    You talk as if oil is the only thing with a price that is going up right now. Most commodities are. Walmarts just announced consumers will be seeing markedly higher prices. Hersey just raised the price of their products 10% across the board due to increased raw material costs. Food prices are up. Commodity prices are up.

    (Of course, as Ben would tell you, these things are not core so they don't matter. Irrelavant to our discussion, but I had to get it in.)

    .

    ReplyDelete
  119. You brought up the "70 New Fields," Q; I didn't.

    Of course, with "70 new fields" it makes you wonder why they're spending Billions to explore the deep water of the Red Sea, but . . . . .

    Do you suppose that a couple of Billion new customers in India, and China might have something to do with ALL commodities rising?

    Do you suppose that that couple of billion new customers are going away?

    Oh, wait, I forgot, Larry Kudlow assured you that oil was going back to $20.00/barrel. Yikes.

    ReplyDelete
  120. .

    You brought up the "70 New Fields," Q; I didn't.

    To point out that supply is not the problem at the moment.

    You take near term price rises and falls and say they are related to the long term issue of oil supply instead of seeing that they are the result of other more important factors right now.

    While I don't dispute your long-term thesis, I think it clouds your short term thinking. If I recall a number of your posts over the past couple months you were wondering about why prices hadn't risen more. The answer, the market sets the prices.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  121. .

    Of course, with "70 new fields" it makes you wonder why they're spending Billions to explore the deep water of the Red Sea, but . . . . .

    If you are wondering about that, I'm disappointed. If that is the case, it appears you know less than I thought you did.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  122. Q, Brent Crude is $117.00/bbl, yet Saudi Arabia is producing less oil, and "exporting" a lot less oil than they were in 2005 (when oil was about $50.00.)

    At the same time Chinese, and Indian Imports have been rising, with the exception of one year, by A Million Barrels/Day +.

    ReplyDelete
  123. .

    Q, Brent Crude is $117.00/bbl, yet Saudi Arabia is producing less oil, and "exporting" a lot less oil than they were in 2005 (when oil was about $50.00.)

    At the same time Chinese, and Indian Imports have been rising, with the exception of one year, by A Million Barrels/Day +.


    Interesting Ruf.

    However, again you are looking at only production numbers and drawing inferences. I concentrate on usage numbers. I have given you those numbers before showing that the only place usage went up substantially was China.

    I would dig out the numbers for you again but I promised my wife I would take to the show to see the movie Paul.

    Have a good day bud.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  124. Q, due to a Very Deep Recession, "Consumption" fell about 5 Million Barrels/Day in the OECD countries.

    BUT, here's the kicker: Consumption ROSE by about the same amount in the NON-OECD countries.

    NOW, the OECD countries are trying to come out of recession. Now what? Where do they go to get back their 5 Million Barrels?

    ReplyDelete
  125. A previous commenter noted that we are sending in CIA people that have little knowledge about the area. Now there are reports that NATO is asking the rebels not to seek vengeance. Clearly, the President, most of the Pentagon and NATO commanders have never spent time in an Arab country other than attacking them. Their shock at vengeance killings betrays a level of naivety that can only be explained by ignorance of how a tribal society works. This is as absurd as asking conservative Americans to abandon dogma and embrace rational thinking - social studies should be taken seriously as part of military curricula.

    ReplyDelete
  126. This is as absurd as asking liberal Americans to abandon dogma and embrace rational thinking.

    ReplyDelete
  127. Sent by my wife to get a gallon of milk - radioactive milk from Spokane -I don't know whether she wants the 1%, 2% or the radioactive skim. A little radioactivity is good for you I heard on the tv talk, but I'm staying away from the spinach nonetheless.

    a/bakadwr

    ReplyDelete
  128. Them May Die Within Weeks'
    By Dominic Di-Natale

    Workers at the disaster-stricken Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan say they expect to die from radiation sickness as a result of their efforts to bring the reactors under control, the mother of one of the men tells Fox News.

    The so-called Fukushima 50, the team of brave plant workers struggling to prevent a meltdown to four reactors critically damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, are being repeatedly exposed to dangerously high radioactive levels as they attempt to bring vital cooling systems back online.

    Speaking tearfully through an interpreter by phone, the mother of a 32-year-old worker said: “My son and his colleagues have discussed it at length and they have committed themselves to die if necessary to save the nation.

    “He told me they have accepted they will all probably die from radiation sickness in the short term or cancer in the long-term.”

    a/bakadwr

    ReplyDelete
  129. Libya conflict leaves both sides running short of ammunitionTwo weeks of intense fighting leaves rebels and government forces low on weapons – and exposes rebel's shortcomings




    Both sides in the Libya conflict are running short of weapons and ammunition after almost two weeks of intense fighting that has brutally exposed the military shortcomings of the rebels, the Guardian has been told.

    The rebels were forced into yet another retreat on Wednesday, with Muammar Gaddafi's forces regaining much of the territory taken by them at the weekend and threatening to humiliate the western coalition by again coming within striking distance of Benghazi.

    Concern is deepening in the coalition about the rebels' fragile morale and lack of military experience to mount a sustained challenge to the regime.

    A military stalemate is now a real possibility, partly as both sides are struggling to re-equip their forces.



    heh

    a/bakadwr

    ReplyDelete
  130. Forget "Futures."

    Spot Price on Louisiana Light Sweet one minute ago was $119.00/barrel. That is what the Refiners are paying at this minute for their feedstock.

    North Slope Crude was selling for $118.00.

    ReplyDelete
  131. Oops, forgot the link.

    Upstreamonline (Spot Prices - Global)


    Minas (Indonesian) $125.00/bbl

    Tapis (Malaysian) $121.00/bbl

    ReplyDelete
  132. BTW, these numbers haven't moved much in the last 30 days. Libya doesn't seem to be that much of a "driver."

    ReplyDelete
  133. Researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society have stumbled upon a geological colossus in a remote corner of Afghanistan: a natural stone arch spanning more than 200 feet across its base.

    ReplyDelete
  134. Alaska moonshiner carves up his own door with a chainsaw, goes to jail, pees on cell wall, lights blanket on fire, and attacks troopers.

    "Alcohol was a factor"

    ReplyDelete
  135. Al-Sharqiya TV revealed new pictures of tortured inmates in Baghdad’s Rassafe Prison. Revealing the amount of torture imposed on detainees in Nouri Maliki’s prisons, these pictures show most of the wounds being inflicted on the prisoners’ heads and backs.

    Bet they long for the days when handing them a Koran with bare infidel hands was called "torture".

    ReplyDelete
  136. Christian Science Monitor -

    Libyan opposition forces need training and organization to oust Muammar Qaddafi, but the US military shouldn't be involved, Defense Secretary Robert Gates told Congress Thursday.

    ReplyDelete
  137. “Deposing the Qadhafi regime, as welcome as that eventuality would be, is not part of the military mission. In my view, the removal of Col. Qadhafi will likely be achieved over time through political and economic measures and by his own people,” Gates told the House Armed Services Committee.

    “There will be no American boots on the ground in Libya.”


    Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0311/52342.html#ixzz1IDmxOTRz

    ReplyDelete
  138. Moments later, former Colorado Governor Richard D. Lamm stood up and gave a stunning speech on how to destroy America .

    ...




    "Here is how they do it," Lamm said: "FIRST, to destroy America , turn America into a bilingual or multi-lingual and bicultural country." History shows that no nation can survive the tension, conflict, and antagonism of two or more competing languages and cultures.

    ...

    Lamm went on: SECOND, to destroy America , "Invent 'multiculturalism' and encourage immigrants to maintain their culture. Make it an article of belief that all cultures are equal.

    ...

    THIRD, "We could make the United States an 'Hispanic Quebec' without much effort. The key is to celebrate diversity rather than unity.

    ...

    "FOURTH, I would make our fastest growing demographic group the least educated. I would add a second underclass, unassimilated, undereducated, and antagonistic to our population.

    ...

    "My FIFTH point for destroying America would be to get big foundations and business to give these efforts lots of money. I would invest in ethnic identity, and I would establish the cult of 'Victimology.'

    ...

    "My SIXTH plan for America 's downfall would include dual citizenship, and promote divided loyalties. I would celebrate diversity over unity.

    ...

    "Next to last, SEVENTH, I would place all subjects off limits; make it taboo to talk about anything against the cult of 'diversity.' I would find a word similar to 'heretic' in the 16th century - that stopped discussion and paralyzed thinking.

    ...

    Finally he said,. "Lastly, EIGHTH, I would censor Victor Davis Hanson's book "Mexifornia." His book is dangerous.

    ReplyDelete
  139. In a statement released last week, the rebels reported on the results of a meeting held on March 19. Among other things, the supposed rag-tag revolutionaries announced the designation of the Central Bank of Benghazi

    Even mainstream news outlets were puzzled. “Is this the first time a revolutionary group has created a central bank while it is still in the midst of fighting the entrenched political power?” wondered CNBC senior editor John Carney. “It certainly seems to indicate how extraordinarily powerful central bankers have become in our era.”


    The Rothschilds control the world, their name sounds like a candy bar, candy is bad for you, bars are where mens pick up wimmens, people dance at bars, they also dance in Africa, Obama was born in Africa, Obama is bad for you, therefore, Obama is the Antichrist!

    ReplyDelete
  140. In the latest edition of his Gloom Boom Doom report, the ever-gloomy Marc Faber discusses the matter of former Goldman board member Rajat Gupta, who is alleged by the SEC to have passed on inside information to Galleon's Raj Rajaratnam.

    ...

    Between this and the failure of anyone to get prosecuted over the financial crisis (he hones in on Mozilo), Faber declares:

    ...

    Unfortunately, I believe that the ongoing moral decay among US politicians and the business elite, the irresponsible fiscal and monetary policies, the decline in educational standards and infrastructure, the trade and current account deficit, the weak US dollar, and the heavy- handed and ambiguous meddling in foreign affairs by US officials, are all pieces in a puzzle, which when assembled reads: Failed State.

    As for investing, he sees big implications from Japan:

    However, all these conditions and catastrophes (in the case of Japan) are in general, I believe, conducive to more money printing. In particular, I believe that the Japanese government will need to massively monetise its debt.

    ...

    Furthermore, look for a lot more action in the resources world.

    Moreover, as my friend Robert Mitchell (who is not on the board of Rajaratnam, Gupta, Kumar, Mozilo & Co., Inc.) argues,

    [T]he ravenous need for clean electricity which prominently includes nuclear on the menu will reassert itself in countries like China, India, South Korea, and Russia (see below). Further, the cost of money will jump for companies trying to develop uranium production and the current and prospective demand will reassert itself in large demand and constrained supply that was in place prior to this isolated and anomalous event.


    'Failed State'

    ReplyDelete
  141. A $600,000 frog sculpture that lights up, gurgles "sounds of nature" and carries a 10-foot fairy girl on its back could soon be greeting Defense Department employees who plan to start working at the $700 million Mark Center in Alexandria, Va. this fall.

    ReplyDelete
  142. That actually ties right into my post.

    ReplyDelete
  143. The only thing shorter than a Jewish Man's Penis
    is a Black Guy's to do list.

    Since I was only dating black guys, my shrink thought I should date people of other races, so I did, except for Asian guys, cause you know I want to have an orgasm, not get my computer fixed.

    Lisa Lampanelli

    ReplyDelete
  144. Good thing you appended "Lisa Lampanelli" to your post, Doug, because, I was thinking you got that joke out of Playgirl.

    ReplyDelete
  145. Norah Jones should thank you, Mel. You just sold some more of her music!!!

    ReplyDelete
  146. Bangorn Sudmuong, general manager of the Tubkaak Resort in Krabi, said the situation had been very difficult in key affected areas.

    ...

    Thailand has been facing unseasonably cold weather with temperatures in the northern provinces at half their normal reading at less than 20C, with livestock dying from the low temperatures.

    This time of year is usually one of the hottest, with Thailand approaching the peak of the dry season when temperatures normally hit the low 40s Celsius.


    Thai Floods

    ReplyDelete
  147. What is 20 Celsius? Somewhere in the 40F range?

    What kind of livestock dies from that?

    ReplyDelete
  148. About 68'.

    Must be some pretty piss-weak livestock.

    ReplyDelete
  149. NOW, I got it.

    It's just a debt-collection scheme.

    Arab Banking Corp., a lender part- owned by the Central Bank of Libya, used a branch in New York to borrow at least $5 billion from the U.S. Federal Reserve as credit markets seized up in 2008 and 2009.

    Deadbeats R Not U, Asshole

    ReplyDelete
  150. .

    A good portion of the time Ruth Marcus is a dick; however, in this instance she is dead nuts on:

    The truth about the false choice

    .

    ReplyDelete
  151. NOW, I got it.

    It's just a debt-collection scheme.


    And if the cost of debt-collection happens to go over $5 billion, why, the taxpayers will foot the bill.

    ReplyDelete
  152. .

    WASHINGTON — General Electric Co went on the defensive on Thursday over a report it paid no income taxes in 2010, unapologetically saying it seeks to reduce what it owes, but expects to pay more this year.

    Chief Executive Jeff Immelt said people who assert the corporate tax controversy damages his credibility as head of a White House panel on job creation and economic competitiveness can "think what they think."

    ...The New York Times reported last week that GE owed nothing in federal income taxes in 2010 despite earning $14 billion, about a third from its U.S. operations...

    The report has fueled criticism from some quarters, including labor groups, that GE and other corporations receive special treatment from the government while millions of Americans struggle in a tough economy.

    It also led former Sen. Russ Feingold, a liberal Democrat still vocal on labor issues nationwide, to call on President Barack Obama to dump Immelt from the White House panel on job creation.


    Why no, we don't owe any taxes

    .

    ReplyDelete
  153. Wouldn't be the first time, would it? :)

    ReplyDelete
  154. Wouldn't be the first time, would it? :)

    Referring, of course, to T's post regarding debt collection.

    ReplyDelete
  155. Am I hallucinating?

    Didn't Q have a post between 2:04 and 2:10?

    ReplyDelete
  156. I'm reading a book by Oliver Sacks "The Mind's Eye". He has among other problems a difficulty recognizing faces - prosopagnosia(sp?). He tells a story about two professors meeting for lunch, both having this disability, which is caused by a lesion in a certain part of the brain. It is quite a humourous story. He also wrote "The Man Who Mistook His
    Wife For A Hat" He is a great guy, and did some great work with some tribe in the south pacific. He is a neurologist.

    a/bakadwr

    ReplyDelete
  157. The War Powers Resolution is a resolution, not an Act, is it not?

    Even if it were and Act it'd probably be unconstitutional as the Supreme Court ruled in some other case that Congress's remedy if they don't like stuff is to cut the funds off. (I think)

    a/bakadwr

    ReplyDelete
  158. The groundswell -

    DONALD TRUMP FOR PRESIDENT????

    I HEARD THE INTERVIEW ON THE OREILLY FACTOR AND THAT GUY SAYS IT LIKE IT IS: FOR INSTANCE HE STATED THAT CHINA IS NOT PLAYING BY THE RULES AND TRUMP WOULD MAKE CHINA PAY 25% IMPORT TAX TO MAKE OUR BETTER PRODUCTS MORE IN LINE WITH PRICE.

    DONALD TRUMP ALSO MEMTIONED THAT THAT KENYA BOY IS "POSSIBLY A MUSLIM" NOW THAT ALONE IS A TRUTH THAT NO OTHER POLITICIAN HAS SPOKEN, I MEAN NONE.

    HE IS FOR A BETTER AND FAIR TAX FOR EVERY ONE.

    BLESSINGS DALE


    heh !

    a/bakadwr

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