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Tuesday, November 23, 2010

North Korea is the Responsibility of China, Japan and South Korea



Let's face it, there would be no North Korean belligerence or threat of nuclear weapons without the role played by China in the region. Without Chinese economic support, Kim Jong-il would have disappeared years ago.

Without the criminal gang-related state of North Korea, there would be little reason or justification for US presence in the region. The South Koreans would have had us leave twenty years ago.

China allowed this sore to fester and at a minimum is guilty of benign neglect. North Korea is a problem for China, South Korea and Japan. Between the three of them they are holding $1.8 trillion in US debt. If they want us to solve the problem it is at least worth half of that, call it an even trillion. If they don't like the price, let them fix it themselves.

107 comments:

  1. While the exercises "are designed to deter further provocative behavior by North Korea, obviously it's not working," the official said. "When we announced joint military exercises in the Yellow Sea, it only angered China.

    ...

    Scott Snyder, director of the Center for U.S.-Korea Policy, the Asia Foundation, called the act a "very serious provocation."

    "It also signals dissatisfaction with the inter-Korean relationship and an apparent willingness to keep inter-Korean tensions high. The incident could reflect a more aggressive view of what a nuclear North Korea thinks it can do without facing a broader escalation of tensions."


    Threatening 'Retaliation'

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have an idea sloshing around in the back of my head that I can't shake. It brought me wide awake after only a couple of hours of sleep. It's been "bothering" me for several weeks, now.

    I'm going to call it "The Plan." It excites me, but it "worries" me. Am I going to have to, actually, do something about it? What? It's going to be a huge "pain in the ass" if I do. It has the potential of completely screwing up a "peaceful" retirement.

    I think I'll kind of work out a few of my thoughts, here, over the next few weeks, months, whatever. Bear with me. I know you are all Expert "Scrollers," so feel free to "Scroll away."


    "The Plan"

    To show that Tunica County, Ms. can become Entirely Energy Self-Sufficient. To lay out a groundwork for producing 100% of the Fuel Transportation, and Electricity the County needs, locally, and without using any finite fossil fuel supplies.

    Also, "The Plan" is intended to "Lower" the costs of energy for the County, while providing many good-paying jobs, and, within 10, or so, years culminating in utility bills at least 50% lower than today.

    "The Plan" will utilize Wind Power, Solar Power, and Biomass to produce Ethanol, and Bio-Diesel. It will have to pass "Real World" Tests. The Costs will have to be In-line with "Established" Industry Standards, and the ideas will have to be "Implementable" in the "Real World."

    Posting on "The Plan" will be sporadic. Research will have to be done, and, quite honestly, I don't have a clue where to go for some of the information.

    But, I'm pretty sure of the "Broad Strokes." I'm pretty sure I can install, and pay for (principal, and interest) Windmills in, or very near, 10 Years. I'm pretty sure I can do Solar in less than 20.

    The Biomass, of course, will begin, almost immediately, producing transportation fuel below present costs, creating electricity locally at lower than present costs, and providing good jobs for local people rather than jobs for Houstonians, and Sauds half a world away.

    So, before I call it a night let me say this: I believe that virtually All but the most Urban of Counties in the United States Could produce All of its own Electrical, and Transportation Energy.

    Why is that important? The average county is about 100,000 population. On average, every man, woman, and child sends $3.82 "out of County" just for gasoline/diesel. That's $382,000.00/Day going to Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Nigeria, Kuwait, ad nauseum.

    And, "Next Year" it's going to be more.

    With Deuce's indulgence I'll pick this up a little later. I'm going to go for a drive.

    ReplyDelete
  3. .

    It's alive!

    The Plan is alive!


    ---------------------------
    Now that's what I'm talking about Ruf. You throw out these numbers that don't really mean much to me so I give you a hard time.

    Now, with the "Plan", you can prove what you have been saying is true.

    I am not kidding when I say good luck to you. I hope you pull it off.

    You da man.

    (Periodic updates would be nice. Maybe you can get some suggestions from the EB patrons. Or, at least, a little encouragement.)

    .

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm in. The best way to do it would be for me to give you a key to the front door.

    That would allow you to put a direct link from post to post. It would allow you to post graphs, photos an video.

    If you have stage fright, I'll give you a secret location where you can post. Whit or I will tidy it up for you, and we can go for there.

    I agree somewhat with Q, Everything you post,
    (well not everything)
    seems to make sense, tying it all together makes a plan.

    Who knows you may get back on Larry Kudlow.

    Do it. Email to Whit .

    ReplyDelete
  5. :)

    Thanks for the support, guys. The reports will come, mostly, I think, in "bits, and drabs," and, not necessarily, with great rapidity.

    A lot of the best information dips into the area of "proprietary" knowledge. I've found that many times you can "tease it out," but it takes awhile. I'm going to strive to be as "reality-based" as possible, while, at the same time, recognizing certain trends that seem almost certain to continue to a "reasonable" point.

    I think, Deuce, I want to nip away at it for awhile, and then when it comes time to start aggregating, and organizing I'll take you up on your offer (I might "rethink" this approach as soon as later today.) Maybe I'll just hang myself, now. :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. As for Kudlow: I don' think he's going to make it into the 21st Century. I'm afraid the Kudlows of the world are pretty much '90's type guys. John Stewart is where it's at.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Obama's popularity is sinking so low that no one seems to care

    President Obama has passed the Big 4-0 -- going the wrong way.

    Turns out voters were not simply satisfied to spank the Democrat and his party in the Nov. 2 midterm elections with historic losses in the House of Representatives.

    Obama's job approval rating as calculated by the Zogby Poll has now sunk to 39%, a new low for his 22-month presidency that began with so much hope and excitement and poll numbers up around 70. As recently as Sept. 20, his job approval was 49%.


    Never mind, no need to worry, Sarah Palin will revive his popularity

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  8. U.S. to Send Carrier for Joint Exercises Off Korea
    By DAVID E. SANGER and MARK McDONALD
    Published: November 23, 2010


    WASHINGTON — President Obama and South Korea’s president agreed Tuesday night to hold joint military exercises as a first response to North Korea’s deadly shelling of a South Korean military installation, as both countries struggled for the second time this year to keep a North Korean provocation from escalating into war.

    North Korean artillery shells killed two marines and destroyed several houses and other buildings on the South Korean island of Yeonpyeong.


    Members of the South Korean Red Cross in Inchon loaded supplies bound for Yeonpyeong Island on Wednesday after it was shelled by North Korea.
    The exercise will include sending the aircraft carrier George Washington and a number of accompanying ships into the region, both to deter further attacks by the North and to signal to China that unless it reins in its unruly ally it will see an even larger American presence in the vicinity.

    The decision came after Mr. Obama attended the end of an emergency session in the White House Situation Room and then emerged to call President Lee Myung-bak of South Korea to express American solidarity and talk about a coordinated response.

    But as a former national security official who dealt frequently with North Korea in the Bush administration, Victor Cha, said just a few hours before the attack began, North Korea is “the land of lousy options.”

    Mr. Obama is once again forced to choose among unpalatable choices: responding with verbal condemnations and a modest tightening of sanctions, which has done little to halt new attacks; starting military exercises that are largely symbolic; or reacting strongly, which could risk a broad war in which South Korea’s capital, Seoul, would be the first target.

    ReplyDelete
  9. It will be one hell of an exercise. (mostly in stupidity).

    It will give the Chinese an opportunity to simulate how they take out an American carrier group. It will help them update the latest in ECM and CECM.

    The exercise should save the Chinese about $5-6 billion in R&D, and reduce their lead times by a year or two.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Others say our failure to carry out the excercise as planned after the torpedoing of the S. Korean ship signaled weakness leading to the present situation.

    ReplyDelete
  11. The Great Game Imposter

    And we wonder why we haven’t found Osama bin Laden.

    Though we’re pouring billions into intelligence in Afghanistan, we can’t even tell the difference between a no-name faker and a senior member of the Taliban. The tragedy of Afghanistan has descended into farce. In the sort of scene that would have entertained millions if Billy Wilder had made a movie of Kipling’s “Kim,” it turns out that Afghan and NATO leaders have been negotiating for months with an imposter pretending to be a top Taliban commander — even as Gen. David Petraeus was assuring reporters that there were promising overtures to President Hamid Karzai from the Taliban about ending the war.

    Those familiar with the greatest Afghan con yet say that the British had spent a year developing the fake Taliban leader as a source and, despite a heated debate and C.I.A. skepticism, General Petraeus was buying into it. The West was putting planes and assets at the poseur’s disposal, and paying him a sum in the low six figures.

    “It’s funny but not funny because the consequences are so staggering,” said a Western diplomat. “Put it this way: It was not well handled.”

    We’ve heard a lot about the shadow world of Afghanistan, but this is ridiculous. We’re bargaining with the shadow of a shadow. Even President Karzai may have been fooled. The man taking us for a ride may have been taken for a ride.

    Indeed, sometimes it feels as if the entire region is taking us for a ride. Everybody is lining up for Western cash, treating America, the British and NATO like suckers. President Karzai and his brother toy with us for their immense personal profit, even as they corrupt their own elections. Karzai undermines the American military plan by going up against General Petraeus on night raids. And the Taliban and the Pakistan intelligence service are playing us as well.

    America is stomping around the moonscape of Afghanistan trying to do the right thing, but we can’t because we’re clueless about the culture to the point where we can be faked out by an imposter masquerading as Mullah Akhtar Muhammad Mansour, a high-level Taliban commander.

    ReplyDelete
  12. The Great Game Imposter

    And we wonder why we haven’t found Osama bin Laden.

    Though we’re pouring billions into intelligence in Afghanistan, we can’t even tell the difference between a no-name faker and a senior member of the Taliban. The tragedy of Afghanistan has descended into farce. In the sort of scene that would have entertained millions if Billy Wilder had made a movie of Kipling’s “Kim,” it turns out that Afghan and NATO leaders have been negotiating for months with an imposter pretending to be a top Taliban commander — even as Gen. David Petraeus was assuring reporters that there were promising overtures to President Hamid Karzai from the Taliban about ending the war.

    Those familiar with the greatest Afghan con yet say that the British had spent a year developing the fake Taliban leader as a source and, despite a heated debate and C.I.A. skepticism, General Petraeus was buying into it. The West was putting planes and assets at the poseur’s disposal, and paying him a sum in the low six figures.

    “It’s funny but not funny because the consequences are so staggering,” said a Western diplomat. “Put it this way: It was not well handled.”

    We’ve heard a lot about the shadow world of Afghanistan, but this is ridiculous. We’re bargaining with the shadow of a shadow. Even President Karzai may have been fooled. The man taking us for a ride may have been taken for a ride.

    Indeed, sometimes it feels as if the entire region is taking us for a ride. Everybody is lining up for Western cash, treating America, the British and NATO like suckers. President Karzai and his brother toy with us for their immense personal profit, even as they corrupt their own elections. Karzai undermines the American military plan by going up against General Petraeus on night raids. And the Taliban and the Pakistan intelligence service are playing us as well.

    ReplyDelete
  13. America is stomping around the moonscape of Afghanistan trying to do the right thing, but we can’t because we’re clueless about the culture to the point where we can be faked out by an imposter masquerading as Mullah Akhtar Muhammad Mansour, a high-level Taliban commander.

    As Dexter Filkins and Carlotta Gall revealed in The Times on Tuesday, the Afghan faker attended three meetings with NATO and Afghan officials, traveling across the border from Pakistan, where Taliban leaders are hiding with the help of the ISI, the Pakistani intelligence service (even though we give Pakistan billions of dollars in aid every year).

    The Times’s article said that the phony was even ushered into a meeting with Karzai at the presidential palace in Kabul. Something the crafty Karzai denied.

    He may have been dispatched as an agent by the Taliban — whose leaders still deny there are any peace talks — or the double-dealing Pakistani intelligence service. “The Taliban are cleverer than the Americans and our own intelligence service,” a senior Afghan official told The Times. “They are playing games.”

    Bizarrely, the Afghans let the fake Mansour retreat over the border. In a further huge embarrassment for the Western intelligence community, he was not held to determine whether he was an enemy agent. Nor is this the only confusion about our war. We also can’t seem to get the calendar straight. First, we were leaving in 2011. Then maybe we weren’t. Then we weren’t leaving until 2014. Then maybe we aren’t.

    In trying to please all his many wartime constituencies, President Obama has provided a confusing plethora of plans and semiplans for withdrawal. No sooner had the NATO ministers in Lisbon agreed that we were staying till 2014 than Obama declared that “early 2011 will mark the beginning of a transition to Afghan responsibility.”

    On the duration of our commitment to the war in Afghanistan, we seem to be faking ourselves out.

    Obama wants to get out; Petraeus wants flexibility. “The real protagonists are the president and the general,” one Obama adviser noted dryly.

    It should have been a sign that the Russians, who are a lot more vicious than us and have a much closer cultural attachment to the Graveyard of Empires, got whipped after 9 years and 50 days — which we’re now exceeding.

    Just as with Saddam and W.M.D., or groping and the T.S.A., we get no satisfaction for the $80 billion a year we spend on intelligence. Or we get fake information like Curveball that leads us into spending trillions more on a trumped-up war. Last year, seven top C.I.A. officials were fooled by a Jordanian double-agent who got onto an American base in Khost and blew all of them up. Our agents in the “wilderness of mirrors” may not be up to le CarrĂ©, but can’t they learn to Google, or at least watch “The Ipcress File”?

    Who knows? Maybe we’ve been dealing with bin Laden all along. Maybe he’s been coming and going under a different moniker. As far as our intelligence experts are concerned, a turban and beard are just a turban and beard.

    ReplyDelete
  14. You see the Japanese set the gold standard in sending in carrier groups. They didn't tell anyone that they are coming.

    It was one big SAYONARA to half of our navy.

    We on the other hand since the Battle of Midway, announce the itinerary of our carriers, just so that we don't make anyone nervous that we may be serious.

    Fuck South Korea.

    They shoved it up the President's ass when he visited at the G20. They don't like American cars, but they love our carriers. Send the carriers in the other direction.

    Obama needs to get rid of those corduroy bell bottoms and dust of some of those change ideas.

    ReplyDelete
  15. The Great Game Imposter

    And we wonder why we haven’t found Osama bin Laden.

    Though we’re pouring billions into intelligence in Afghanistan, we can’t even tell the difference between a no-name faker and a senior member of the Taliban. The tragedy of Afghanistan has descended into farce. In the sort of scene that would have entertained millions if Billy Wilder had made a movie of Kipling’s “Kim,” it turns out that Afghan and NATO leaders have been negotiating for months with an imposter pretending to be a top Taliban commander — even as Gen. David Petraeus was assuring reporters that there were promising overtures to President Hamid Karzai from the Taliban about ending the war.

    Those familiar with the greatest Afghan con yet say that the British had spent a year developing the fake Taliban leader as a source and, despite a heated debate and C.I.A. skepticism, General Petraeus was buying into it. The West was putting planes and assets at the poseur’s disposal, and paying him a sum in the low six figures.

    “It’s funny but not funny because the consequences are so staggering,” said a Western diplomat. “Put it this way: It was not well handled.”

    We’ve heard a lot about the shadow world of Afghanistan, but this is ridiculous. We’re bargaining with the shadow of a shadow.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I hate to pee on the parade, but it was a South Korean ship that was sunk, was it not?

    ReplyDelete
  17. "They shoved it up the President's ass when he visited at the G20."

    ---

    After he grabbed his ankles and asked for it:

    What kind of amature advertises future accomplishments without first securing agreements in private to insure that it will be so?

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  18. The S.Koreans do not like our marines, they do not like our bases in S. Korea, made us remove our tactical nukes, ban our beef, and do not like our cars.

    They dissed Obama when he dragged his tele-prompters to Korea to accept a trade agreement. Obama didn't have the balls to stand his ground and remind them who their daddy was.

    Now, we have a problem with the Norks? It doesn't look like a problem to me.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Weakness is provocative:

    The present occupant of the Whitehouse regularly provides proof that this is so.

    ReplyDelete
  20. "The S.Koreans do not like our marines, they do not like our bases in S. Korea, made us remove our tactical nukes, ban our beef, and do not like our cars. "

    ---

    Presumably because they don't see themselves as better off than the Norks, thanks to our sacrifice.

    Korea must have some version of the NEA shaping young minds into such pretzels.

    ReplyDelete
  21. The CIA is made up of boys whose families sent them to Princeton but wouldn't let them into the family brokerage business.
    Lyndon B. Johnson

    ReplyDelete
  22. It was not always that way. The ROK's sent three combat divisions to Viet Nan in
    1963 to support the US. Unfortunately that was almost a half century ago.

    ReplyDelete
  23. They have not threatened to shut down their little peace village north of the DMZ, either:

    South Korean industries there contribute hundreds of millions to the pathetic N. Korean Economy, which strains to reach a Billion.

    ReplyDelete
  24. The ROK troops knew exactly what was right and what was wrong when they visited rural villages. Many were rural farmers themselves.

    They would go into a hut and know if there was too much rice in the larder, say enough for the family and then more than enough to feed the Viet Cong.

    They were good, tough and scared the shit out of the VC. They were not very reliable in bringing back prisoners.

    They were the first to innovate with helicopter interrogation techniques.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I am not sure who owns those businesses. Korea like most of Asia is so complicated. There are many ethnic Chinese in Korea and they are globalists in their business interests.

    In Northern China, they like the Koreans, their culture and their woman. It's hard to tell who is on first.

    ReplyDelete
  26. 'Rat recognizes the name:
    "Slopes"

    ReplyDelete
  27. slippery slopes

    ...President Bush may not have not have won the Nobel Peace Prize and was hugely unpopular at the dictator-friendly United Nations, but he was mightily feared by America’s enemies. Many a tyrant shuddered after US tanks rolled into Baghdad and removed one of the most odious psychopaths on the face of the earth from power. Even the supposedly unbeatable al-Qaeda wilted in the face of the surge in Iraq, suffering huge losses and humiliation at the hands of US forces.
    George W. Bush believed in American exceptionalism and wasn’t afraid to show it. He also believed that human rights and the spread of liberty and freedom across the world really mattered, and would be an integral part of American foreign policy.
    It is frankly hard to decipher what the current US administration believes in with regard to its foreign policy, except the language of appeasement and a belief in American decline as a global power. With the exception of Afghanistan, where the brilliant General Petraeus has recently been wiping the floor with the Taliban, the Obama administration is floundering in a sea of confusion on the world stage. And even in Afghanistan, military successes on the battlefield are being undermined by a destructive, artificial exit strategy set in path by the White House, which hands the long-term advantage to the enemy.

    ReplyDelete
  28. {...}

    The latest provocation by North Korea, with artillery fired at the South and the killing of two South Korean marines, comes at a time when American leadership has gone AWOL on the world stage, and the White House looks weaker than it has been in decades. It is hardly surprising that America’s enemies look increasingly bullish in the face of a president who makes Jimmy Carter look like General Patton.
    And things look hardly better on the Iranian front, where the brutal and barbaric Islamist regime inches closer towards becoming a nuclear-armed state, which threatens the security of Israel and the future of the Middle East. In the meantime, the White House is expending a great deal of energy on signing a monumentally flawed new START Treaty with Moscow which actively undermines US interests, increases the strategic power of Russia, and significantly undercuts Washington’s ability to deploy a global missile defence system.
    In an increasingly dangerous world, Barack Obama has adopted a meek, deer in the headlights approach. While America’s foes grow stronger, the United States appears weaker and more vulnerable. At the same time, US alliances with Great Britain, Israel, Japan, and Central and Eastern Europe have all taken a hit from a White House that has been more concerned with apologising to US adversaries than strengthening friendships with key allies.
    Barack Obama looks increasingly like a lame duck president, not only at home but also abroad, as his administration faces an array of complex and highly threatening challenges. The United States remains the world’s only superpower, but its status is being dramatically undercut by a striking lack of leadership in Washington. The Obama administration’s “smart power” approach has been anything but, and the latest aggression emanating from Pyongyang is a stark reminder that America cannot afford to be letting its guard down, and needs to stand up to its enemies rather than appease them.

    ReplyDelete
  29. "Many a tyrant shuddered after US tanks rolled into Baghdad and removed one of the most odious psychopaths on the face of the earth from power. Even the supposedly unbeatable al-Qaeda wilted in the face of the surge in Iraq, suffering huge losses and humiliation at the hands of US forces."

    ---

    Then the decider deferred to his team of squabblers and oversaw them making a hash out of it.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Funny how little some things change. I spent four months in a special technical school In South Ruislip in the London west suburbs. Half that time I took the Central Line subway back and forth to South Woodford in the far East suburbs.

    It was a long ride so in the morning I picked up the Guardian, Telegraph and Observer, On the way home the tabloids, mostly English working class T&A sort of stuff.

    Of course I was in uniform and got used to hearing "who is the yank with all the papers?"

    ReplyDelete
  31. So here I am 45 years later still reading the same damn papers on the web. Whoda thunkit?

    ReplyDelete
  32. That's a long way of saying the last article was from The Telegraph.

    ReplyDelete
  33. .
    "Many a tyrant shuddered after US tanks rolled into Baghdad and removed one of the most odious psychopaths on the face of the earth from power. Even the supposedly unbeatable al-Qaeda wilted in the face of the surge in Iraq, suffering huge losses and humiliation at the hands of US forces."

    ;)
    .
    .
    .
    .

    ReplyDelete
  34. .
    In my opinion, one of the only areas where Obama has been right on foreign policy has been with North Korea.

    What has he done? Zip.

    The six party talks have failed to bring NK around so we backed off interfacing with NK. It's driving Kim nuts. There game is intimidation and extortion. Right now they are broke and starving.

    The events with the boat and this one point out their frustation. Like the neighborhood bully, they are screaming, "Hey, we are still here." It comes from frustration that we haven't been playing their game.

    I agree we shouldn't be sending the carrier over. Like the majority here I think we are currently stretched militarily. Worse, I have doubts that when push comes to shove we are really committed to using the carrier force.

    Looking like a paper tiger in Asia is all we need right now.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  35. .
    That's a long way of saying the last article was from The Telegraph.

    I didn't think it came from the Guardian. It would have been nice to have a link to see who the authors were.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  36. Goodmorning! All you brighteyes!

    Now I know what it is like to be a popsicle!

    My windshield never cleared to Albertson's and back. Nor did the rear window de-icer get the job done.

    I love you all so, I wish I could share with you.

    Overwhelmingly share The Weather. Send it all to you.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Celebrate A Vegan Holiday

    PETA is out there fighting for us all.

    Spare that turkey. Say grace, have goodness, eat a goose instead.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Wed Nov 24, 06:45:00 AM EST

    That's just not fair. 80 percent of Republicans love her.

    She will swing the independents.

    We will have a little morality in the White House, for a change.

    You will just have to get used to it.

    I like the sounds of it - President Palin - has a nice ring to it, don't you think?

    ReplyDelete
  39. They were the first to innovate with helicopter interrogation techniques.

    Speak, and truth too, or....fly.

    ReplyDelete
  40. It seems there are two main themes here on the Korean situation:

    1.) We shouldn't appease them
    2.) We should let the South Koreans and others in the region deal with it on their own.

    If we did 2 wouldn't that amount to appeasing them? Do you think we should tuck our tail between our legs and move our troops out as well? Deploying that aircraft carrier is the next logical step in NOT appeasing the Norks, no?

    ReplyDelete
  41. We will "Drill, baby, drill" - we will build nuke plants everywhere - we will close the border - we will make Idaho English the official language of the land - we will appoint sane Supreme Court Justices - hunting and fishing will come back as the national sports - we will lose weight just from the exercise - we will not dis our traditional allies - we will support Israel - we will build a new generation of everything - we will get back to our 'roots' - we will be happy again!

    ReplyDelete
  42. Death For Our Nation's First Turkey?

    Some of those awful lawyers are still chipping away at it. But don't get your hopes up.

    Looks like we will have to vote the magpie out.

    Which seems almost a certainty in my mind now.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Lutheran Thanksgiving Hymn -

    To Thee, Eternal Soul, Be Praise Hymn

    To Thee, Eternal Soul, be praise!
    Who, from of old to our own days,
    Through souls of saints and prophets, Lord,
    Hast sent Thy light, Thy love, Thy Word.

    We thank Thee for each mighty one
    Through whom Thy living light hath shone;
    And for each humble soul and sweet
    That lights to heaven our wandering feet.

    We thank Thee for the love divine
    Made real in every saint of Thine;
    That boundless love itself that gives
    In service to each soul that lives.

    We thank Thee for the Word of might
    Thy Spirit spake in darkest night.
    Spake through the trumpet voices loud
    Of prophets at Thy throne who bowed.

    Eternal Soul, our souls keep pure,
    That like Thy saints we may endure;
    Forever
    through Thy servants, Lord,
    Send Thou Thy light, Thy love, Thy Word.

    ReplyDelete
  44. arggh - I was going back to bed, then saw this - Ron Paul, Idiot

    rat's kind of idiot guy....

    ReplyDelete
  45. .
    That's just not fair. 80 percent of Republicans love her.

    Why I am unlikely to become a Republican again for a long time.

    She will swing the independents.

    :)

    We will have a little morality in the White House, for a change.

    :):)

    You will just have to get used to it.

    :):):)

    I like the sounds of it - President Palin - has a nice ring to it, don't you think?

    ;)
    .
    .
    .
    .


    Stop it, you're killing me.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  46. .
    Ron's my guy. But I suspect he's wrong about Americans standing up and boycotting the airlines.

    They gave up their balls a long time ago. I don't expect them to be asking for them back any time soon.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  47. Stop it, you're killing me.

    My aim, entirely,
    Quirk Stop.

    :) Not really. You are worth a laugh or one.

    ReplyDelete
  48. That Damn Dumb Sarah Palin - Always Putting Herself First

    Damnit, I think she is the most wonderful woman on Earth.

    She is stupid???????

    Give me a goddamn break.

    ReplyDelete
  49. South Korea needs to be investigated for war crimes.

    It shot off a disproportionate number of rockets.

    Just how many innocent North Koreans did it murder?

    ReplyDelete
  50. Bob, there are a lot of people like you who like her and want her to run.

    She is not a closer, cannot win the election, but will sweep the early primaries, and that is why the Old Guard is worried.

    I will plan personally on four more years of Obama.

    ReplyDelete
  51. No offense, Bob, but Palin is just a side show. MSM are the carnies.

    Step right up! See the bearded lady with 3 breasts! If you are 18,go right in! If you are not, the ferris wheel is that way!

    4 more years of Obama. What a night mare.

    ReplyDelete
  52. I hear you guys loud and clear, but I am emotionally committed and you are tearing my heart out.

    Besides, the primaries are over before I vote.

    Let Don Quixote have his dreams.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Don Quixote would have solved
    America's energy problem by now, just with his windmills.

    Don Quixote is my brother's familiar.

    Always, he has had a statue of Don Quixote on his desk.

    All the way through medical school, to this very day, I imagine, though haven't seen him in a while.

    The Don, lance askew, on the old nag Rosinante.

    Between the two of us, my brother is the better man (on most things) and I accept it, and am most proud of him.

    ReplyDelete
  54. .
    That's a good name for you Bobbo.


    "The Don"


    Kind of rakish, mysterious, dare I say it, cool.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  55. How 'bout Bobbo The Don Rosinanto?

    Sounds humorous, and dangerous, at the same time.

    The women might be attracted to that.


    Better than bob of the aching bad back.

    ReplyDelete
  56. .
    It's noted on CNBC that the King of Saudi Arabia arrives for back surgery.

    He comes in on three jumbo jets to accomodate a 40 car entourage 20 of which are for clothes.

    Quite Obamaesque.

    .

    ReplyDelete
  57. May they amputate his legs by mistake.

    ReplyDelete
  58. How many sheets can one fucking A rab wear in one week?

    ReplyDelete
  59. Bob, I haven't written her off, yet. The more the Bushes, et al, dump on her, the more I want to hear from her.

    But, she needs to start doing some "policy," now. She doesn't have to be right about everything (I mean, how in the hell would you know, anyway?) but she needs to start voicing opinions.

    I want to know what Government programs she would cut. I want to see a concrete plan for a concrete result. Whether it would work or not will be debated, but she has to "get in the game."

    She keeps "talking" about "Commonsense." She needs to Give an Example of what she means; then, we can decide if it's "common sense," or not.

    ReplyDelete
  60. I agree, Ruf.

    But "Drill, baby, Drill" is one example where she's already stepped up to the plate.

    And nuke power too. She's not afraid of that.

    ReplyDelete
  61. "Drill, Baby, Drill" has lost a little luster after the GOM Macondo debacle, Bob. She's going to have to step up her game.

    She can go on Hannity, and whine, "I'm not stupid;" or she can start trying to "prove" it.

    One will work; one will not.

    ReplyDelete
  62. We should leave ourselves vulnerable over the short term to energy blackmail.

    That is why drill baby drill is evil.

    ReplyDelete
  63. ""Drill, Baby, Drill" has lost a little luster after the GOM Macondo debacle, Bob. She's going to have to step up her game.
    "

    30 THOUSAND Rigs in the Gulf:
    Less spilled over time than natural seepage.

    A Straw Dog.

    ReplyDelete
  64. ...but a good excuse for the Marxist in chief to decimate the drillers in the Gulf.

    ...and the families and economy that depend on them.

    ReplyDelete
  65. She really needs to pull a "Nixon to China."

    The USGS recently revised the "Reserves" in the National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska DOWN from 10 Billion Barrels to 1 Billion Barrels.

    Meantime, this is the first year in several decades that Conoco won't drill a well up in Prudhoe Bay. Within a couple of years the North Slope Oil will be Stranded due to not enough oil running through the pipeline to maintain "Minimum Operating Level."

    For the first time, Ever, the IEA just admitted that the world would never again produce as much Crude Oil as it did in 2006.

    Sarah-baby needs to get "all over" this, because, if she doesn't it's going to get "all over her."

    ReplyDelete
  66. Gotta figure a way to get a winner like Jindal past the primaries.

    ReplyDelete
  67. It isn't all about what you and I think, Doug.

    It's about all those potential 'voters.' The ones that think that the core of the earth is one big, chewy nugget of "crude." That think that oil would be $2.00/barrel if the government would just let'em drill.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Jindal would be good, I think. But, yeah, how would you do that?

    Pawlenty IS running; and I could live with him. I don't trust Daniels - too close to the Bushies.

    ReplyDelete
  69. She is getting better on the interviews.

    It is an art, like reading the stars above.

    But, I think, she is beginning to master that art.

    Nature is there. But we can graft the rose, make it better, as our Bard has taught us.

    Go, Sarah. go!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Her book is No. 1.

    Kicked Dubya's ass.

    ReplyDelete
  71. .

    DeLay convicted of money laundering charges

    Former U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay answers questions from the media at the 250th District Court during jury selection in his corruption trial on Oct. 26, 2010, in Austin. DeLay had been indicted five years ago on charges that he illegally funneled corporate money to help Republicans in Texas legislative races in 2002.

    After almost 19 hours of deliberations, a Travis County jury today convicted former U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay on felony charges of political money laundering.

    DeLay faces two to 20 years in prison on a conspiracy charge and five to 99 years or life on a money laundering charge. DeLay remains free on bail, with sentencing tentatively set for Dec. 20...


    .

    ReplyDelete
  72. .
    Ireland to Cut Spending 20%, Raise Taxes as Talks Climax


    Reduced spending on welfare is part of an overall plan to generate an additional 15 billion euros for the budget by 2014.

    Prime Minister Brian Cowen is racing to conclude talks with the European Union and the International Monetary Fund on an 85 billion-euro aid package.

    Finance Minister Brian Lenihan will maintain Ireland’s 12.5 percent corporate tax rate.

    Ireland’s government said it will cut spending by about 20 percent and raise taxes over the next four years as talks on a bailout of the country near conclusion.

    Welfare cuts of 2.8 billion euros ($3.8 billion) and income tax increases of 1.9 billion euros are among the steps planned to narrow the budget deficit to 3 percent of gross domestic product by the end of 2014. The shortfall will be 12 percent of GDP this year, or 32 percent including a banking rescue...


    Irish Austerity

    .

    ReplyDelete
  73. Ireland's lucky I'm not King of the Americas. I'd put an end to tht Ireland, Corporate Income Tax Haven thing first thing tomorrow morning.

    Then see how they liked their 12% Corporate "Tax" (Rip-off the USA) Rate.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Local high school principal Jim Luders said Greymouth, home to many of the miners, was devastated by the country's worst mine disaster since 1914, when 43 died in a gas explosion at a mine in Huntly on the North Island.

    ...

    Grey District mayor Tony Kokshoorn, who earlier declared the incident was the "darkest hour" for the South Island's rugged West Coast region, said the focus has turned to the grim task of recovering bodies for grieving families.

    "They won't feel closure until they're (with) their loved ones," he told TVNZ.


    Demanding Answers On Mine

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  75. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  76. God bless m' daughter, I can hear the music again. Your guy ain't no Josh Ritter though.

    Glad I got reminded what day 'tis.

    I go now to buy some Wild Card 2's.

    ReplyDelete
  77. I'll bet there isn't one of you slick big city slackers knows barley is up to $177/ton here locally, a good price.

    Josh Ritter - Wolves

    ReplyDelete
  78. We got a couple of good bands coming to The Clearwater River Casino in the immediate future, but I can't find my CR schedule so can't say who they are. Good ones though.

    Also, we have boxing nights now too.

    Other than Cassius Clay, and that guy from Cuba, I never did think much of boxing.

    I remember one time in Vegas, when I was seeking my old girl friend, I went to a fight. Great big tall guy, took it on the chin, straight down he went, his head bounced a couple times, they carried him out on a stretcher.

    :)Which is a good image of the way I left Vegas, failing in the romance with my then lady.

    Hindsight is wonderful.

    Christ did I dodge a bullet there.

    ReplyDelete
  79. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  80. Balcony Scene of Romeo and Juliet

    I know this one by heart, kiddies, I wrote my major paper on it.

    'tain't bout romance, but character, an' fucking it all up....

    ReplyDelete
  81. I can't stand sad endings no more.

    I could not read King Lear again.

    Least Romeo and Juliet are together, in death.

    ReplyDelete
  82. Balcony Scene Here

    The guy who created this should not be in jail.

    ReplyDelete
  83. .
    Least Romeo and Juliet are together, in death.

    Is that all you ever think about Bob?

    Geez. This one's for you. It fits with your proclivities.

    Spiritual

    .

    ReplyDelete
  84. Quirker, it's been on my mind.
    But my scans came in, cancer free. Only my lower L-4 lumbar is really fucked up. Last act of farming, the gods laugh, in their perverse way.

    I think death transmutes us, lovely.

    But watch what, and how, you do things, in this life.

    Romeo coulda had Juliet, if he had played his cards right.

    But Romeo is always Romeo, as they say, and Ahab always Ahab.

    ReplyDelete
  85. You will recall, Romeo was bonkers for some other chick, before he went for Juliet.

    He had, let us admit, very little control of his emotions.

    I like the guy.

    ReplyDelete
  86. You deleted one of my all time favorite songs for that.

    ReplyDelete
  87. The controversy surrounding Google Street View in Germany has taken a bizarre turn, less than one week after the online mapping service was launched.

    ...

    Three per cent of Germans - about 250,000 people - chose to opt out by having their homes blurred. But their actions reportedly sparked a backlash from anti-privacy vandals, who pelted homes in Bergerhausen, Essen, in western Germany with eggs and stuck "Google's cool" notes on their mailboxes, Deutsche Welle reported.

    ...

    In August, Street View captured images of a nine-year-old girl "playing dead" on the pavement of a street in England.


    Bizarre Twist

    ReplyDelete
  88. Quirker, I am booking next week a float down the main Salmon, in August, you need to get out of Detroit for a while.

    I am inviting Melody along, too.

    And WiO, and Sam.

    ReplyDelete
  89. That sounds fun. I'll have to try and make it. 'Though I think next July/August is my bi-annual trip to Malaysia.

    ReplyDelete
  90. 'If you have AIDS it's irresponsible to have sex with anyone, full stop. It's not an act of love to put someone's life at risk.''

    Dr Tonti-Filippini said there had been considerable discussion within the church about whether sex within marriage using a condom was still the ''marriage act''. If it was, then the use of condoms to prevent infection would be allowable.

    ''But others, including the Pope, have said that is not the marriage act. It's like mutual masturbation if you use a condom.''


    Still Split

    ReplyDelete
  91. Good grief, I think the Pope neads to get layed.

    Night.

    ReplyDelete
  92. "it is always sinful to use condoms within marriage"


    Hm…That makes a whole lot of sense. I guess vibrators, eatable panties and handcuffs are out of the question, too. Its none of their business what you do within your marriage.

    ReplyDelete
  93. The North criticised the South for scrapping the planned talks on family reunions. It repeated claims that Seoul provoked the artillery attack by firing into the North's territory.

    ...

    China is under mounting pressure to intervene, despite its reluctance to do anything to destabilise the regime in Pyongyang.

    ...

    Australia called the "outrageously provocative" shelling a threat to the entire region's stability and Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd said: "I believe it's important now for China to bring all of its influence to bear on North Korea."


    'Mad Dog'

    ReplyDelete
  94. You see, I have some other friends -

    Hello Everyone,

    It is with great sadness that I share with you that our friend and great Patriot Vicky Greathouse has passed.

    She went to be with the Lord on Sunday November 21, 2010. She had an aneurysm and went quickly. John was with her at the hospital. I spoke with John at length yesterday and he asked that I pass this information on to all of you that loved and knew her.

    Vicky will be greatly missed...only God knows.

    John has asked that you join in a celebration of Vicky's life on Friday December 3, 2010 at 2:00pm at the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Hamilton. There will be a reception following the service at the church.

    If there was ever a Patriot who fought the fight to preserve our property rights that was Vicky. Along side John in the fight they were persistent and diligent for our freedom.

    Please remember to pray for John and the family during this very difficult time. If you would like further information please feel free to call me at 360-5534.

    God Bless,
    Mona


    Pray for her.

    ReplyDelete
  95. Some of these people over in Montana are damned great.

    ReplyDelete
  96. Wed Nov 24, 09:18:00 PM EST

    It's for all of us Quirk.

    It's hosanna.

    ReplyDelete
  97. Watson, an experienced diver, was his wife's dive buddy when she drowned on their honeymoon during a scuba dive in 2003.

    US prosecutors are likely to charge Watson for her murder.

    They allege Watson tricked his 26-year-old bride into going to Australia in order to kill her.


    Deported From Australia

    ReplyDelete